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Tim Treadgold

Perth commentator Tim Treadgold is one of the state's highest-profile business journalists. He brings decades of experience to Business News, offering readers sharp and insightful analysis of current events and breaking news.

Energy glut costs Paladin $1bn

Uranium mining is a challenging business at the best of times, but the current abundance of oil and gas is making life even harder for companies such as Paladin Energy.

Yellen call key for gold fortunes

FEATURE: Les Davis and Bill Beament are two of the Western Australian gold industry’s most influential people, but the person who has infinitely more power over gold in WA than the chief executives of Silver Lake and Northern Star doesn’t live here.

Appetite for growth at Northern Star

FEATURE: Star in name, star in nature; it has been a rapid rise for one of the state’s major players.

Getting back to business as reality check changes outlook

FEATURE: If the adage ‘three strikes and you’re out’ applied to the gold mining industry, the curtains would already have been drawn; but some determined locals are fighting on.

Scottish result may have echo in far-off WA

If Scotland votes for independence exactly two weeks from today, expect a revival in another part of the world that has had the occasional secession debate – Western Australia.

True test for money managers

The premier and treasurer have some tough choices to make if they’re to salvage the state’s economic fortunes.

Qantas pays for service shortcomings

Once the clear leader of Australia’s aviation industry, Qantas has provided a dramatic demonstration of what happens when management ignores the views of its customers.

Investor caution meets capital flight

FEATURE: Having gained notoriety in the 1996 movie Jerry Maguire, the phrase ‘show me the money’ will be heard often, and loudly, in business in Western Australia in coming years as capital inflows become capital outflows and funds become harder-than-ever to raise.

Dollar dive a case of when, not if

The political standoff in Canberra will put a spotlight on the value of the $A, and the uncompetitive nature of large segments of Australia’s economy.

Nickel leads base metals mix

FEATURE: Subdued iron ore and gold prices over the longer term could signal a lift in exploration for base metals.

Growth by merger key strategy in quest to level the playing field

FEATURE: A stubbornly high dollar, falling prices and high operating costs are combining to exert real pressure on smaller players in the iron ore sector.

Stevens weighs in on dividends

Retail investors in Western Australia love their Wesfarmers and Woodside shares. Professional investors are not so sure, and neither is the governor of the Reserve Bank of Australia, Glenn Stevens.

Big players assert their authority

From mining to retail and everything in between, it seems bigger is better – particularly when the going gets tough.

Roy Hill boost to Rinehart net worth

If a fortune valued at $20 billion is not enough for Australia’s richest person, Gina Rinehart, then perhaps she will be happy with $37 billion that is likely to be her net worth at this time next yea

Wages squeeze the new trickle-down

There are work opportunities available for those able to relocate, as a shift to supply-side economic reforms gains traction.

Care to put a price on Diggers?

Kalgoorlie’s Diggers & Dealers forum may not be for sale, officially, but the recent purchase of Cape Town’s Mining Indaba conference for $84 million puts a value of at least $24 million on Diggers, and that would be hard price for the owner, Kate Stokes, to reject.

US calling for resources capital flow

Western Australia is once again the key player in a money flood, though this time it’s outgoing rather than incoming.

Indonesian pickle for nickel?

Copper today, nickel tomorrow?

Bank report grim reading for property

The shake-up of the commercial office market has some way to run, with a major investment bank tipping a big drop in rents.

Commodity cycle keeps on turning

The iron ore and gold mining industries have served Western Australia well during the past decade, but that does not mean they will do the same job over the next decade, especially if the switch to other minerals evident on world markets gathers pace.

Ore buyers seek quality over quantity

The high-cost, low-price environment has put the squeeze on iron ore miners.

Living on borrowed time

Bank bashing is a national sport in Australia, often played for good reason; but the latest round of kicking banks, which started this week with the release of a report by former Commonwealth Bank boss David Murray, could not have come at a worse time.

Big players take the soft option

The move by Gina Rinehart and Andrew Forrest into beef production may ultimately be more about the land they own than ‘feeding China’.

Latest TSR data shows major performance

FEATURE: Takeovers are a powerful way of delivering short-term returns to investors, as the Total Shareholder Return data released by Morningstar and applied to 700 companies on the Business News BNIQ database.

Dot.com era echoes as tech stocks surge and miners diversify

FEATURE: Tech-related stocks make up half of this year’s top 10 TSR performers, but resources stocks feature prominently over the longer term.

Tech drives OBJ’s magnetic attraction

FEATURE: Resources companies may dominate the big numbers on the local bourse, but it’s a relatively unknown technology stock that leads in TSR.

Expect more Navitas fallout

Losing one contract is not the biggest problem confronting locally based education provider Navitas, even though Macquarie University’s decision to end a near 18-year relationship wiped $800 million off the value of the stock yesterday.

Powder keg just needs a spark

The banks are at it again, and the ducks are close to lining up for a re-run of the GFC.

Qantas must rue its Kodak moments

No financial result will be more carefully watched when annual reporting season kicks off in a few weeks than that of Qantas, a business some critics have dubbed the ‘Kodak of the aviation industry’.

LNG sector opens up with Shell out

Shell’s move out of Woodside has opened up a range of scenarios as major players jostle for a stake of WA’s LNG riches.

Social media’s white noise

At the risk of being called a Luddite at best, and a heretic at worst, I have spent a bit of time over the past few months trying to understand the business case for social media – and failing.

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Window opens for lithium hopefuls

ANALYSIS: Worldwide demand for lithium is rising and more than 20 companies in WA are on board for the ride.

All good things must eventually come to an end

A number of asset classes are facing the likelihood of a bust this year, with WA watchers’ eyes trained on the lithium sector.

WA lithium gets jump on rivals

ANALYSIS: A forecast global surge into electric cars and buyers’ growing preference for the state’s hard rock lithium ore is putting a rocket into the sector.

New model shake-up for online used car sales

The second-hand car business was revolutionised 20 years ago with the arrival of the internet, but there is a second revolution under way that promises to be even more disruptive and could have a significant effect on some of Western Australia’s best-known car yards.

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Doubts over Qantas flight plan

OPINION: As promising as it sounds, the prospect of non-stop flights from Perth to London might not be the success some people seem to believe.

Analysis: The e-tail retail divide

If anyone didn't already know that the internet is a powerful tool for retailing they do now thanks to Australia's best ever example of how to shoot yourself in the foot.

Wine a contender for worst industry

Margaret River grape growers might hate the idea of a coal mine in their backyard, but unless the outlook for Australian wine improves they might have to change their minds.

Analysis: Bunnings' market strategy

Price fixing is illegal. What about product pegging? If you haven't heard that expression before, get used to it because it is about to revolutionise Australian retailing.