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Tim Treadgold

Perth commentator Tim Treadgold is one of the state's highest-profile business journalists. He brings decades of experience to Business News, offering readers sharp and insightful analysis of current events and breaking news.

WA convalesces as fever spreads

Having already struggled through the fallout of the commodities price slump, WA could find itself emerging from its slump before other states.

China currency shift – pain and gain

Following its recent currency devaluation, a more competitive China should prove to be a good thing for Western Australia’s export industries, but there will be some pain in achieving that possible future benefit because no-one knows how other countries will react to the China surprise.

Could media turn back to the future?

To merge or to demerge is a question that goes beyond the mining industry; it’s one that is also dividing opinions in the media world, with Australian and American publishers heading in opposite directions in what looks like a classic schism of ideas.

Speeding towards a financial black hole

Banks and their customers are eagerly awaiting the next move on official interest rates in the US.

Investors milking BHP dry

BHP Billiton’s annual profit statement to be released next month could contain a pleasant surprise for shareholders, and a nasty surprise for Australia.

‘Old-school’ struggles in new retail economy

Empty shopfronts in some of Perth’s high-profile retail strips are a sign of WA’s wider economic malaise.

Race to the bottom has a way to run

Architects have a saying about ‘less being more’. The mining industry has flipped that around with ‘more being less’, as shown in this week’s production reports and share prices of Fortescue Metals and BHP Billiton.

WA retail trapped in global net

Retail, not mining, has borne the brunt of the slowdown in Western Australia during the past 12 months, with a study of the state’s economy by the investment bank Goldman Sachs revealing a startling decline in retail jobs of more than 20 per cent.

Could Alcoa move refining offshore?

A small batch of bauxite sent overseas for refining may signal the start of a much bigger play by Alcoa, which would have major consequences for WA’s South West.

Banks squeezed in volatile market

There is a range of reasons why bank shares have fallen lately, some from self-inflicted injuries and some due to a changing marketplace.

Uranium and gold offer glimmer of good news

There is no prize for guessing that iron ore companies have plunged to the bottom of the resources component of this year’s TSR survey; but what is interesting is the rise of uranium hopefuls, despite few signs of an imminent increase in the uranium price.

Qantas soars up the charts

Qantas, the biggest ASX-listed company to make the top 100 using total shareholder returns as the yardstick, was also the biggest surprise, with the airline delivering an eye-catching one-year return for investors of 151 per cent.

Alexium on familiar pathway to market

Momentum is building for Alexium, after the award-winning tech developer initially struggled to find its feet.

Small tech stocks head field in lacklustre year - SPECIAL REPORT

It has been a tough year for WA’s once-vaunted resources stocks, as our annual TSR survey reveals. Click through to see more on our Shareholder Returns feature.

Bell tolls for iron ore miners

To best understand what’s gone wrong with Western Australia’s iron ore industry you need to start by looking back 12 years, to 2003, when an ambitious Andrew Forrest created Fortescue Metals Group.

Management mistakes cost Woolworths

The sharks are circling Woolworths, but the size of the business would require suitors to make a significant investment – in cash and time.

Miners, banks at odds over nickel

Most investors have given up on iron ore, recognising it as a game that can only be played by the biggest mining companies.

Now the good news – the only way is up

July 1 will be little more than a date on a calendar for business, with only incremental change likely in the conditions that made 2014-15 such a grim year.

Resources boom morphs into lawyers’ picnic

Tough times are not tough for everyone, it seems, when two recent events are considered

Out with the old, in with the nuclear

New resources opportunities will emerge in WA as older projects start to wind down production, or are closed.

Seven’s Cooper play muddies the waters

The oil price recovery to more than $US60 a barrel appears to be accelerating one of the biggest corporate shuffles ever by a Western Australian company, with Seven Group getting ready to consolidate ownership of the oilfields of South Australia.

No-one is safe from disruption

From power production to online shopping and even diamonds, disruptive technologies are shaking up business as we know it.

Sydney-centric property focus is futile

Sydney is not Australia. There, I’ve said it.

Heading down the rabbit hole

With signs of a downturn growing, the next question is: how do we get the economy back on track to growth?

Luck running out as rebound stalls

If you think you’re working harder to earn less then you’re right, because that’s one of the less pleasing aspects of Australia’s latest economic health check.

Iron ore miners scrap for market share

If you’re wondering why the outlook for iron ore remains grim despite last night’s price rise to a three-month high of $US63.10 a tonne, it is partly because Western Australia’s iron ore miners have a new competitor – themselves.

WA economy 'unsophisticated'

WA’s economy needs to become more sophisticated if it is to take advantage of emerging opportunities along the Indian Ocean rim.

WA economy ‘unsophisticated’

WA’s economy needs to become more sophisticated if it is to take advantage of emerging opportunities along the Indian Ocean rim.

Forrest shoots, and scores, an own goal

It should be clear by now to Andrew Forrest that his campaign for a political inquiry into the iron ore industry has done the company he runs, Fortescue Metals Group, more harm than good – and might even have stirred up trouble for another local billionaire, Gina Rinehart.

An insidious outbreak of post-boom gloom

Those expecting the massive LNG projects under way in the north-west to ride to the WA economy’s rescue may need to think again.

From one extreme to the other

Western Australia’s resources boom drove asset values too high, just as the bust is driving asset values too low; but to best understand that point it’s worth taking a trip to Canada, where the sale of a machinery distributor contains an interesting message for Australian investors.

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Window opens for lithium hopefuls

ANALYSIS: Worldwide demand for lithium is rising and more than 20 companies in WA are on board for the ride.

All good things must eventually come to an end

A number of asset classes are facing the likelihood of a bust this year, with WA watchers’ eyes trained on the lithium sector.

WA lithium gets jump on rivals

ANALYSIS: A forecast global surge into electric cars and buyers’ growing preference for the state’s hard rock lithium ore is putting a rocket into the sector.

New model shake-up for online used car sales

The second-hand car business was revolutionised 20 years ago with the arrival of the internet, but there is a second revolution under way that promises to be even more disruptive and could have a significant effect on some of Western Australia’s best-known car yards.

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Doubts over Qantas flight plan

OPINION: As promising as it sounds, the prospect of non-stop flights from Perth to London might not be the success some people seem to believe.

Analysis: The e-tail retail divide

If anyone didn't already know that the internet is a powerful tool for retailing they do now thanks to Australia's best ever example of how to shoot yourself in the foot.

Wine a contender for worst industry

Margaret River grape growers might hate the idea of a coal mine in their backyard, but unless the outlook for Australian wine improves they might have to change their minds.

Analysis: Bunnings' market strategy

Price fixing is illegal. What about product pegging? If you haven't heard that expression before, get used to it because it is about to revolutionise Australian retailing.