Search
Perth has benefited from trade, investment and ideas flowing globally. Photo: Gabriel Oliveira

Global vision delivers local prosperity

Easier movement of goods, capital and people driven by improved technology and economic reform have helped an isolated region become one of the wealthiest in the world. We’ve collated highlights of how WA connects into
the global marketplace.

Click here for the full pdf liftout 


Feeding the world

Half of Australia’s wheat exports are produced in Western Australia, according to the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, worth about $3 billion annually for the state’s economy. The state is also the number one supplier of wheat for Japanese white salted udon noodles.

Innovations developed in WA include the Pink Lady apple, which emerged in 1974 after crossing the Golden Delicious and Lady Williams varieties, and the Bravo (photo below), which crossed the Royal Gala and Cripps Red. Both were created by horticulturalist Jon Cripps. More recently, Dave and Leasa Mazzardis from Gingin bred numerous varieties of blueberries, which are now sold at European supermarkets such as Tesco, Lidl and Spar.

ASX listings

Western Australia’s connection to global capital markets is perhaps best highlighted by the number of companies that raise cash in the state for their projects. 

About a third of all ASX-listed businesses are registered in WA. The lion’s share of these are junior resources companies, many of which have projects or operations overseas. In 2014, for example, 170 of the 220 ASX-listed businesses with activities in Africa were registered in Perth. Examples include Base Resources, with the Kwale mineral sands mine in Kenya, and Perseus Mining, which mines gold in West Africa.

Around a dozen Israeli businesses have listed on the ASX in the past four years with offices in Perth. There are also larger local businesses, including Woodside Petroleum and Wesfarmers, both in the ASX50.

Values and purpose

Mining magnate Andrew Forrest’s leadership in worldwide initiatives to stop slavery show Perth’s reach extends beyond pure corporate interests. His Minderoo Foundation and Walk Free Foundation have played influential roles, publishing four editions of the Global Slavery Index and securing support from religious leaders to stop slavery. Last year, Australia passed its own Modern Slavery Act, meaning large businesses will have to improve transparency about potential slavery in their supply chains.

Perth-based Corporate Evolution is a business encouraging executives to lead with purpose and a focus on values. Clients have included McKinsey & Co, with Corporate training McKinsey consultants across the world, and a series of banks and mining businesses. Malcolm and Lisa Doig founded the business in 2004.

Consular presence

Nepal, Burundi, Oman, Panama and Uganda are among 92 countries with consular representation in Perth, according to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Two of the most significant as far as Western Australia’s international relationships are concerned are China, led by consul-general Lei KeZhong, and the US, with consul-general Rachel Cooke at the helm.

The state government has a presence in eight foreign jurisdictions, with trade and investment offices in locations such as Dubai, Seoul, Mumbai and Jakarta.

The government also has tourism offices in several countries, including Germany, Hong Kong, and the US.

Regional headquarters

Nearly 80 of the Financial Times Global 500 companies have operating bases in Perth, according to the state government. Many have regional headquarters in the city, including Inpex and Chevron Australia. Shell Australia and BP both base their Australian upstream businesses in Perth, with downstream operations on the east coast. ConocoPhillips headquarters part of its upstream business in WA.

The country’s two biggest iron ore miners have major presences on St Georges Terrace, with Rio Tinto Iron Ore and BHP Group WA Iron Ore both headquartered there.

The lure of Perth extends to government-owned foreign businesses, with examples including subsidiaries of Citic Group, China National Offshore Oil Corporation, China Baowu Steel Group, Bank of China and Industrial and Commercial Bank of China.

Add your comment

Students

6th-Australian Institute of Management WA20,000
7th-Murdoch University17,883
8th↓South Regional TAFE10,835
9th-Central Regional TAFE10,000
10th-Training Course Experts10,000
50 tertiary education & training providers ranked by total number of students in WA

BNiQ Disclaimer

Special Report

Great for the State – Edition 1: Global Outlook

Great for the State – Edition 1: Global Outlook

28 March 2019

Our new lift out series highlighting the best of WA and our place in the world

Welcome to Great for the State

Welcome to Great for the State 

As editor of Business News, I’m delighted to introduce a new feature that highlights the best of Western Australia. Great for the State is a 12-page lift-out that will be published each month over the course of 2019.

Science world focused on WA as telescopes scan the universe

Science world focused on WA as telescopes scan the universe 

Free to read: The Square Kilometre Array will provide a boost for science in WA, but there was a point nearly a decade ago where the project could have been lost to the state.

Entrepreneurs pave global pathways for tech

Entrepreneurs pave global pathways for tech 

Free to read: As WA’s tech sector continues to develop, Business News spoke to some of the people helping Perth’s entrepreneurs score wins in global markets.

WA’s seven wonders of the resources world

WA’s seven wonders of the resources world 

Free to read: Western Australia has been home to mining for centuries, evolving from ochre pits excavated by Aboriginal peoples for rituals, art and ceremonies, to a high-tech industry that can economically supply enormous quantities of resources worldwide. Global leadership in innovation and technology adoption has supported this growth. Here are seven of the best local examples.

Global vision delivers local prosperity

Global vision delivers local prosperity 

Free to read: Easier movement of goods, capital and people driven by improved technology and economic reform have helped an isolated region become one of the wealthiest in the world. We’ve collated highlights of how WA connects into the global marketplace.

Outward looking, export focused

Outward looking, export focused 

Over the years, WA business has finessed its offering, from commodities to services, the arts and sophisticated technologies.

Shaping our AV future

Shaping our AV future  

Disruption to traditional forms of travel means we all need to change our current way of thinking and develop a well-defined roadmap for a safe transition into our driverless future.

Our global outlook

Our global outlook 

Look no further than medical research for a successful model on global partnering.

Discoveries made in the laboratories here in Perth are published widely for the broader scientific community.  This worldwide sharing informs the work of scientists across the globe.

More than just iron ore

More than just iron ore 

It is well-known that Western Australia’s economic success is based on mining, but other industries like agribusiness, tourism, and education are stepping up. This, along with our close ties to Asia, is helping to drive our future economic and social prosperity.

UWA 2030: a blueprint for leadership

UWA 2030: a blueprint for leadership 

Over the coming months The University of Western Australia will launch its new vision, UWA 2030. It will be a bold statement in its own right, but more importantly it will provide the people of Western Australia with our blueprint for globally relevant and responsible leadership.