Search

Can AI prevent heart attacks?

PREDICTING if someone is at imminent risk of a heart attack has been for a long time the Holy Grail for heart researchers. WA start-up Artrya Pty Ltd is now applying Artificial Intelligence to the challenge. 

Despite decades of excellent research and the development of sophisticated imaging techniques, heart disease is still the world’s biggest killer. 

The build-up of plaque and the subsequent narrowing of arteries has been the major focus. 

However, narrowed arteries are only part of the story. Heart attacks also occur in people with less than 50% narrowing. In fact, 50% of men and 64% of women who die of heart attack have never had a warning signal and two thirds of them have less than 50% narrowing in the artery. 

The reason is due to a particular type of plaque which can erupt and suddenly block an artery. This plaque is different from the hard calcium detected in CT calcium scans, and is much more difficult to accurately identify. 

Artrya’s all-Western Australian team is developing an Artificial Intelligence solution that if successful could disrupt current approaches and successfully identify at risk patients. 

The start-up is leveraging Perth’s concentration of leading researchers and has brought together a team of 11 West Australians comprising cardiologists, Artificial Intelligence experts and engineers. 

First, the plan is to deliver a system using non-invasive scans to help clinicians better evaluate cardiovascular risk. The aim is to provide a patient report to the treating cardiologist within minutes, as any delay potentially leaves a patient at heightened risk. 

In Australia current wait times can be up to a week. In the UK 230,000 people waited a month before their scan results were received. 

Next the team aims to develop technology that not only identifies plaque but pinpoints plaque which is at heightened risk of rupturing and causing a fatal blockage. 

To achieve this, machines which detect individual pixels will be used as they can work at higher levels of accuracy, consistency and sensitivity than the human eye. 

Already $1million, over-subscribed, in angel funding from Western Australian investors has been put toward the project. 

It will be a major breakthrough if a cost effective and safe technique of interpreting CTCA scan can be developed that identifies patients at risk of dying of heart attack. 

 

Add your comment

WA Revenue

16th-Identitywa$34.9m
17th↑Communicare$30.8m
18th-Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research$28.8m
19th-Australian Wildlife Conservancy$25.3m
20th↓Cancer Council WA$25.0m
123 charitable organisations ranked by WA revenue most recent financial year

BNiQ Disclaimer

Special Report

Great for the State – Edition 5: Disruption

Great for the State – Edition 5: Disruption

30 July 2019

In this edition, we’re painting a picture of how disruptive technology can change our state for the better.
- How can images of your eye help prevent disease?
- Are driving, petrol and car ownership meeting an end?

Innovation revolution for disease, disability

Innovation revolution for disease, disability 

Technology is dramatically expanding access to and the effectiveness of healthcare from the cities to WA’s most remote parts.

Seven WA disruptions, then and now

Seven WA disruptions, then and now 

We share seven of the many stories of WA ingenuity and entrepreneurship to have had an impact during the past five decades.

Disruption in motion

Disruption in motion 

Three big changes in the transport industry will revolutionise how Western Australians move around in decades to come.

Blue sky opportunities

Blue sky opportunities 

In the dunes of the state’s South West, on the mine sites of the red north, or in remote villages around the world, drones are unlocking opportunities.

Perkins, Green lead modern disruptors

Perkins, Green lead modern disruptors 

Before the business she co-founded attained its $1billion ‘unicorn’ valuation, Melanie Perkins hit a point where she thought she had failed her co-founders.

Building connections to enable disruption

Building connections to enable disruption 

Western Australia in 2029 will be dramatically different from today.

Some cars might be autonomous, drones will be buzzing through the sky, visits to the doctor will be possible online, and household objects will be connected to the web.

Disruption and innovation critical to corporate survival

Disruption and innovation critical to corporate survival 

One of the key findings of our 2019 Global CEO Outlook was that 84 percent of the 1,300 CEOs surveyed told us they want a culture where it is accepted that errors and mistakes are part of the innovation process, yet only 56 percent said that they currently have a culture where ‘fail fast’ innovat

Can AI prevent heart attacks?

Can AI prevent heart attacks? 

PREDICTING if someone is at imminent risk of a heart attack has been for a long time the Holy Grail for heart researchers. WA start-up Artrya Pty Ltd is now applying Artificial Intelligence to the challenge. 

The accelerating mobility revolution

The accelerating mobility revolution  

By 2030, more than 50 per cent of revenue generated by the mobility industry is likely to be disrupted.

The art of disruption : innovation at UWA IQX

The art of disruption : innovation at UWA IQX 

Universities are drivers of innovation, facilitating connections and collaboration between researchers, students, founders, funders, investors, and industry. But accessing these attributes can be difficult.