Butcher finds a new home among the Gumtree ads

22/06/2015 - 10:12

Narembeen is typical of many small Wheatbelt towns confronting challenges with an array of business and community development initiatives.

Butcher finds a new home among the Gumtree ads
MEATY MOVE: Tavis Teale (left) and Lyndsay Clement came from Perth to establish Winstons Meat and Provisions. The name was inspired by its location – Churchill Street is the main street of Narembeen. Photos: Attila Csaszar

Narembeen is typical of many small Wheatbelt towns confronting challenges with an array of business and community development initiatives.

Luring a butcher from Perth is just one example of how the local community has been working hard to lift the town.

This sits alongside other initiatives such as the promotional video ‘Rocking Out on the Pathways to Wave Rock’, which was backed by seven shires in the Wheatbelt, including Narembeen.

It was a tourism promotion with a difference, with music by Fremantle band San Cisco and a fun video to promote attractions that visitors can experience on the way to Wave Rock.

The Go Narembeen Progress Association plays a big role in the town; it runs a cropping program using labour and machinery donated by local farmers, with profits going back into the community.

The progress association supported the establishment of a grain discovery centre, which was a new attraction for the town.

It has also teamed up with the Wheatbelt Business Network to lure new businesses to Narembeen.

Three years ago they placed an advertisement on Gumtree looking for a butcher who wanted a fresh start in a small country town.

Lyndsay Clement was a vegetarian living in Perth, and wasn’t looking for a change, but was attracted to the idea when she saw the ad.

Her partner, Tavis Teale, who had trained as a butcher but worked in other fields for many years, shared her interest. They have established Winstons Meat and Provisions in the main street of Narembeen.

Mr Teale admits he went into the business not knowing its prospects or likely turnover, as the town had been without a butcher shop for three years.

“No-one had any idea,” he said.

The progress association did its best to de-risk the move.

It refurbished the Churchill Street premises, which were rent-free for the first 12 months, and provided a zero-interest loan so Mr Teale could buy stock.

Their direct competition comes from the IGA supermarket across the road, which sells meat packed in Perth.

“We’re aiming at the market of people who want good quality products,” Mr Teale told Business News.

The business stocks free-range products like Linley Valley pork, Mt Barker chicken and Fernhill Road beef, along with various seafood products.

And the pair have diversified the product range to include cheeses, smallgoods, pies and salads.

“You need to keep it interesting, we change a lot,” Ms Clement said.

The business is still growing, with the couple having just bought a bread oven and started taking on catering jobs.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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