Search

Building connections to enable disruption

Western Australia in 2029 will be dramatically different from today.

Some cars might be autonomous, drones will be buzzing through the sky, visits to the doctor will be possible online, and household objects will be connected to the web.

But there’s something that needs to underpin all of this – internet infrastructure.

There is already work under way on this front.

(click here to read a PDF of the full 12-page liftout)

Read more: Are we witnessing the death of driving?

Probably the best known is the National Broadband Network, a $50 billion project to deliver broadband across the country with speeds of at least 25 megabits per second.

The alternatives are wireless, either fixed or mobile.

Telstra is already rolling out 5G mobile telecommunications in Western Australia, with access in a zone around Perth CBD.

That connectivity will slowly spread across the metropolitan area in the year ahead.

5G uses shorter wavelengths than earlier cell phone generations and is more powerful.

Telstra network engineering executive Channa Seneviratne said 5G technology would be a major enabler for transport, industrial uses, and at home.

“In five to seven years’ time, 5G will be as ubiquitous as electricity, in my view,” Mr Seneviratne told Business News.

“You’ll see different types of it controlling every aspect of our lives; at home, the way we work, the automation that’ll be possible, entertainment experiences, smart grids.”

Mr Seneviratne said 5G and the NBN would be complementary, with NBN to be used for bigger downloads, while 5G had lower latency.

“To control a vehicle autonomously, you need to send a command, you don’t need to send  a lot of data, but it needs to get to that vehicle quickly,” he said.

“That’s where the low latency of 5G comes into play.

“When you want a vehicle to stop, you need to stop immediately.

“A delay of up to a second, at high speed, not a good thing, you need really low millisecond delays.”

For businesses, 5G could mean high-tech equipment connected to the internet without massive cabling requirements, while for customers, 5G will have virtual reality applications, aiding streaming of sports matches, he said. 

Local internet provider Pentanet is rolling out its own fixed wireless network, a different technology, in Perth.

Pentanet managing director Stephen Cornish said cloud computing was becoming more prevalent. 

That meant data centres would store information, with processing power centralised, so a good link from a home computer or mobile phone was vital, Mr Cornish said.

Mr Cornish said both fixed wireless and 5G could hit speeds faster than fibre optic cables used in the NBN.

But fixed wireless requires line-of-sight to a tower, while 5G can not send signals over very long distances.

Mr Cornish has an ambitious plan for Pentanet.

“I want to bring gigabyte per second internet into the suburbs,” he said.

Add your comment

Included in the following lists:

Number of Employees

Information & Communications Technology

BNiQ Disclaimer

Special Report

Great for the State – Edition 5: Disruption

Great for the State – Edition 5: Disruption

30 July 2019

In this edition, we’re painting a picture of how disruptive technology can change our state for the better.
- How can images of your eye help prevent disease?
- Are driving, petrol and car ownership meeting an end?

Innovation revolution for disease, disability

Innovation revolution for disease, disability 

Technology is dramatically expanding access to and the effectiveness of healthcare from the cities to WA’s most remote parts.

Seven WA disruptions, then and now

Seven WA disruptions, then and now 

We share seven of the many stories of WA ingenuity and entrepreneurship to have had an impact during the past five decades.

Disruption in motion

Disruption in motion 

Three big changes in the transport industry will revolutionise how Western Australians move around in decades to come.

Blue sky opportunities

Blue sky opportunities 

In the dunes of the state’s South West, on the mine sites of the red north, or in remote villages around the world, drones are unlocking opportunities.

Perkins, Green lead modern disruptors

Perkins, Green lead modern disruptors 

Before the business she co-founded attained its $1billion ‘unicorn’ valuation, Melanie Perkins hit a point where she thought she had failed her co-founders.

Building connections to enable disruption

Building connections to enable disruption 

Western Australia in 2029 will be dramatically different from today.

Some cars might be autonomous, drones will be buzzing through the sky, visits to the doctor will be possible online, and household objects will be connected to the web.

Disruption and innovation critical to corporate survival

Disruption and innovation critical to corporate survival 

One of the key findings of our 2019 Global CEO Outlook was that 84 percent of the 1,300 CEOs surveyed told us they want a culture where it is accepted that errors and mistakes are part of the innovation process, yet only 56 percent said that they currently have a culture where ‘fail fast’ innovat

Can AI prevent heart attacks?

Can AI prevent heart attacks? 

PREDICTING if someone is at imminent risk of a heart attack has been for a long time the Holy Grail for heart researchers. WA start-up Artrya Pty Ltd is now applying Artificial Intelligence to the challenge. 

The accelerating mobility revolution

The accelerating mobility revolution  

By 2030, more than 50 per cent of revenue generated by the mobility industry is likely to be disrupted.

The art of disruption : innovation at UWA IQX

The art of disruption : innovation at UWA IQX 

Universities are drivers of innovation, facilitating connections and collaboration between researchers, students, founders, funders, investors, and industry. But accessing these attributes can be difficult.