12/10/2004 - 22:00

Buddha Bar’s evolution continues

12/10/2004 - 22:00

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.

While Marcos Cain took ownership of Subiaco’s chic Buddha Bar more than three-and-a-half years ago, only just this week has the venue evolved to the stage where all the pieces of his vision are in place.

While  Marcos Cain took ownership of Subiaco’s chic Buddha Bar more than three-and-a-half years ago, only just this week has the venue evolved to the stage where all the pieces of his vision are in place.

When Mr Cain bought the former Bombay Garden on Rokeby Road he changed the interior but maintained the Indian food, changing the name to Bombay Curry House.

A little later came the complete name change, Buddha Bar Curry House. At the same time the focus became a little more hip and included a great drinks list to match the curries on the menu.

This week, however, comes the launch of Buddha Bar Restaurant, which takes the venue to a new level, a level Mr Cain has always planned to reach.

“It was always the intention because while Indian at the time was the fastest growing food segment in the world, in popularity it was good but to accommodate our climate and our seafood culture I wanted more lightweight cuisine that was easily catered to throughout Asia,” he says.

So while Chutney Mary’s has opened up across the road, Mr Cain’s plan was always to evolve beyond an Indian restaurant.

And although Buddha Bar Restaurant will move away from a strictly Indian offering, it’s not forgetting its roots.

Indian classics like butter chicken, rogan josh, and beef vindaloo are on the menu.

But there are more Asian-food options, such as phad Thai, mixed seafood sizzling plate, nasi goreng, and the ever-popular classic – freshly shucked oysters. 

The menu and restaurant name was not the only element to undergo renovation.

A new fit-out has taken place, and while the funky lighting and great bright colours remain, there are some welcome editions.

There are new lounge bench seats, including a funky corner ‘day-bed’, and sheer curtains that act as room dividers, giving Mr Cain room to cater to private parties.

“We’ve done that so we can cater to groups of eight with the day-bed or up to 100 in the main room,” Mr Cain says. 

“There is a demand and there is also versatility, and it gives us longevity.”

Mr Cain says the new seating and the use of curtains will build-up an ingredient essential to restaurants – ambience.

“This was really about creating intimacy because it was really like a hallway in here and it was very open, so now it’s more intimate,” he says. 

“I’ve got lighting that lights up these curtains so it looks like a waterfall and the lights really make a difference at night.”

The covered courtyard space, complete with old pavers, has new bamboo flooring that extends through to the laneway entrance, complete with new lighting fixtures.

The new look Buddha Bar Restaurant was officially launched this week, however the menu has been on offer for the past few weeks.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options