14/06/2005 - 22:00

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14/06/2005 - 22:00

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The science of wine has just moved up a level, with recently multi-awarded Margaret River winery Watershed joining forces with Curtin University of Technology to get to the bottom of a good bottle.

Bites

The science of wine has just moved up a level, with recently multi-awarded Margaret River winery Watershed joining forces with Curtin University of Technology to get to the bottom of a good bottle.

The partnership is taking seriously what many connoisseurs and quaffers can vouch for – that it’s usually in the nose – focusing a three-year study of the biochemical pathways that form the aromatic compounds of wine.

Associate Professor Mark Gibberd will undertake the project with research fellow Dr Kerry Wilkinson.

A major funding initiative from Watershed will allow the research team to analyse the chemical composition of grapes from vine to wine, charting the developmental changes aroma compounds go through.

The aim is to better understand the facets of these compounds, so much so that their characteristics could one day be deliberately altered according to winemakers’ specifications.

In a less-than-ironic twist, Watershed’s more aromatic wines, such as its semillon sauvignon blanc, have garnered the winery significant success, both financial and critical, lately.

Experts from Curtin’s Department of Applied Chemistry and the Australian Wine Research Institute will join the project.


Speaking of wine innovation, the constant battle to find better ways to package and seal wine continues.

A Portuguese-rose style called BrightPink is to be marketed in a recyclable aluminium bottle to UK consumers later this year.

The completely metallic casing is reputed to be two thirds lighter than glass and holds a shatterproof advantage over current containers.

Of particular interest to Australian producers will be protection offered from UV light – often the hidden enemy responsible for ruining both white and red wines. UV light is particularly damaging to the tannins, and along with dramatic temperature variations, is responsible for a considerable amount of damaged wine stock.

Similarly, Australian wine lovers may appreciate the fact that aluminium chills in less than a fifth of the time it takes glass to reach your favourite chardonnay temperature.

BrightPink is aimed at the younger demographic, boasting the word ‘pink’ in dark ink visible under UV lighting.


A significant challenge and opportunity for the state’s food and wine industry, the Australian Tourism Exchange, will be held from June 18-24.

ATE, the largest international travel trade show in the Southern Hemisphere, provides a launching pad for local producers into overseas and interstate markets.

The event will be held at Perth’s Convention Centre, with pre- and post-event tours taking in some of WA’s prominent wine and food destinations.


Time is running out to sample one of the hallmarks of Chinese cuisine at its finest, right here in Perth. Peking duck, regarded as one of the ‘foods of the emperor’ because of its luxurious taste and delicate preparation, takes centre stage at Joe’s Oriental Diner at the Hyatt.

On offer until June 18, Joe’s chef works to frame the gamey meat according to a centuries-old tradition. Differing vastly from traditional French methods of preparing the bird, Chinese duck can be incorporated into soups, stir-fries and pancakes.

According to traditional preparations, whole ducks are sliced into 120 perfectly proportioned segments after being roasted.


The Starlight Children’s Foundation’s second annual Five Chef’s Dinner, held on June 7, raised $202,000.

The culinary offerings of five of the state’s top kitchen talents obviously stimulated the tastebuds of the 330 guests, who dug deep to help seriously ill children.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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