28/05/2009 - 00:00

Work on Jindee village to start in two years

28/05/2009 - 00:00

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PLANS for a new beachside suburb 37 kilometres north of Perth, featuring a pedestrian- and cycle-oriented mixed-use village, are a step closer with Planning Minister John Day tabling a metropolitan region scheme amendment this week.

Work on Jindee village to start in two years

PLANS for a new beachside suburb 37 kilometres north of Perth, featuring a pedestrian- and cycle-oriented mixed-use village, are a step closer with Planning Minister John Day tabling a metropolitan region scheme amendment this week.

The beachside village of Jindee, in the City of Wanneroo, is being developed by Nedlands-based Estates Development Company and has a potential 1,000 home sites.

Encompassing 112 hectares of coastal land, the development will feature a high- and low-density mix of urban, suburban and natural precincts.

The urban core of the development will interface with the Butler development on Marmion Avenue, with the Brighton town centre meeting Jindee to create a major urban area with building up to four storeys in height.

The design and planning process has been a collaborative effort between local design firm Roberts Day and US-based urban design consultants DPZ and Studio LFA.

Estates Development Company general manager Michael Glendinning said the project had been in the pipeline for seven years, and was hopeful work would start on the site in about two years' time.

Further down the coast, Mirvac has received approval for its Bridgewater North residential development outline development plan from the City of Mandurah.

The 570-dwelling residential development, located on a 30ha parcel off Sticks Boulevard in Mandurah, was subject to a more than 18-month approvals process, which included receiving federal government approval over concerns of the impact on Carnaby's Black Cockatoo habitats.

The federal approval was subject to several conditions, including tree retention to preserve habitats, and the removal of nine foreshore lots providing a 70-metre buffer to a nearby osprey nest.

Mirvac also undertook a climate change vulnerability assessment, the first of its kind for any development in WA.

Mirvac WA chief executive Evan Campbell said the company had made some changes to the plans following community consultation.

These include increasing the minimum foreshore setback by 20 metres to a minimum of 50 metres and up to 100 metres in the north of the site.

The height limit for all development adjacent to Mandurah Quays was also reduced from three storeys to two storeys, and the public open space provision is more than double the requirement.

Mirvac will also provide increased infrastructure and amenity in and around the site, including an upgrade of western public open space outside the ODP area, upgrade of the Sticks Boulevard/Old Coast Road intersection and Leisure Way connection and the provision of six affordable housing opportunities.

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