18/02/2015 - 14:38

Wave energy plant turns on at Garden Island

18/02/2015 - 14:38

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Carnegie Wave Energy has switched on its innovative CETO power plant, which will provide renewable electricity to the HMAS Stirling naval base on Garden Island.

Wave energy plant turns on at Garden Island
Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane (right) and Carnegie CEO Michael Ottaviano switching on the world's first grid-connected wave energy array power plant.

Carnegie Wave Energy has switched on its innovative CETO power plant, which will provide renewable electricity to the HMAS Stirling naval base on Garden Island.

This marks the first time Carnegie's CETO 5 power plant has been connected to the energy grid, with all power to be purchased by the Department of Defence.

More than $100 million has been invested in the project over 10 years, with further investment underway in a larger CETO 6 power plant.

The CETO 6 units will have a targeted 1 megawatt power capacity, which is four times the current CETO 5 units.

Energy Minister Mike Nahan said through state and federal funding, Carnegie had taken WA to a world-leading position in wave energy commercialisation.

“This technology has been developed over 10 years, can operate in a variety of water depths, swell directions and seafloor conditions and can generate power for both onshore and offshore consumption,” Dr Nahan said.

Environment Minister Albert Jacob said the wave farm harnessed the enormous and untapped renewable energy resource in ocean waves and converted it into two of the most important resources on the planet – clean energy and fresh water.

The project was officially switched on by Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane and HMAS Stirling captain Angela Bond.

Mr Macfarlane said the project was evidence of a commercial success in renewable energy.

“This type of practical application will guide future development of Australia’s renewable energy sector,” he said.

Dr Nahan said the project was a boost to the state’s economy.

“Projects like this create employment for Western Australians and provide ways to tap into the state’s rich renewable energy resources,” he said.

Australian Renewable Energy Agency chief executive Ivor Frischknecht said “planning and design work has already begun on Carnegie’s next generation CETO 6 technology, supported by $11 million of ARENA funding".

“These larger unites are aiming to deliver around four times the capacity of CETO 5 units, improving efficiency and reducing energy generation costs.”

Carnegie chief executive Michael Ottaviano said the project was the culmination of many years’ work by the Carnegie team.

“The fact that this is the only wave power station operating anywhere in the world is a testament to the innovation and diligence of the Carnegie team,” he said.

When Carnegie’s newly-commissioned desalination plant on Garden Island is integrated into the Perth wave energy project, it will also become the first wave power station in the world to produce both power and fresh water.

Carnegie shares closed 4.9 per cent higher at 6.4 cents per share.

 

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