04/04/2006 - 22:00

Vic Park high-rise plan sunk

04/04/2006 - 22:00

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The Town of Victoria Park has knocked back an application for a 12-storey residential and commercial development near the foreshore at Burswood, further illustrating the growing issue of high-rise development.

Vic Park high-rise plan sunk

The Town of Victoria Park has knocked back an application for a 12-storey residential and commercial development near the foreshore at Burswood, further illustrating the growing issue of high-rise development.

At a late March meeting, the council was split 4-3 against the Campion Design Group proposal for 71 multiple dwellings and offices at Hawthorne Place, Burswood.

Of the 1360 letters the council sent to the owners and occupiers of properties within the consultation area, 130 objections were received, mostly regarding height and the potential loss of views, setback distance to street and parking issues.

The development has a four-storey office component on the southern end of the site, while the residential component graduates in height from three storeys where it adjoins the offices, to a maximum of 12 residential storeys, plus a storey under the roof form, which screens and contains plants and services plus a viewing platform. 

Victoria Park approved the development of the Sands and MacDougall site at 53-63 Burswood Road in December of 2002, which comprises a 12-storey residential and commercial building.

In July 2005, the council issued planning approval for a mixed use commercial and residential development at 43-47 Burswood Road with an 11-storey residential component.

A sub-group of the design review committee conducted a study to consider the application ahead of the council meeting that considered the application, recommending support for the proposal, subject to a number of conditions.

“As the visual impact of a development is determined primarily by its metric height rather than the number of storeys, the proposal is considered reasonable and council discretion to vary the height is requested,” the urban design study said.

The overall building height to the top of the roof is 41.1 metres, which is below the 45m, 12-storey equivalent, set height limit recommended by the urban design study.

The design review committee said the proposal is for a high standard of development which contributes positively to the future development of the precinct.  Town of Victoria Park manager of planning and development services Rochelle Lavery said the precinct needed an “iconic” building such as the one proposed.

“It’s a very interesting design, is of high quality and fits within the criteria for development,” she said.

“Those locals who objected to the development were particularly located on the ridge where the building would partially obscure their views to the river. Others were worried about the car park, setbacks and increased traffic and congestion around the proposed development.”

Under the town planning scheme for the causeway precinct, planners recommend the area be developed as a business and residential area providing support services primarily for the city centre.

“Commercial uses will be the prime focus of the precinct, with the inclusion of residential uses as a mixed used or separate development,” the scheme states.

“The proposal is consistent with the statement of intent for the causeway precinct and the objectives for the office/residential zone.”

Ms Lavery said she expected Campion Design Group to appeal the decision to the State Administrative Tribunal.

Campion Design Group managing director Andrew Campion said the company would not comment on the decision as it was reviewing the plan.

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