UON scores legal wins

24/05/2021 - 14:30

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Malaga company UON has claimed several victories in its long-running battle with Taranis Power Group over the intellectual property on their competing products.

UON scores legal wins
Kenny Keogh (left), Mark Keogh and Lex Scott-Mackenzie.

Malaga company UON has claimed several victories in its long-running battle with Taranis Power Group over the intellectual property on their competing products.

The dispute centres around the role played by Gabriel Hoascar, who left UON in March 2016 and shortly afterwards joined Taranis, which is also based in Malaga.

The two companies have subsequently been engaged in multiple disputes before government agency IP Australia, which registers patents, the Federal Court and the Supreme Court over their variable speed pumps.

UON commenced the Supreme Court action against Mr Hoascar, alleging he misused its confidential information and solicited its clients, including BHP, Rio Tinto and Mineral Resources.

As part of that action, the Supreme Court last year overturned a confidentiality regime that had prevented UON from inspecting documents discovered by Taranis and Mr Hoascar.

This included documents relating to the research and development of Taranis’ Variogen variable speed pump.

UON has recently been awarded costs in the sum of $50,872 in respect of that application.

Separately, UON has successfully opposed a patent application by Taranis Power.

UON provided evidence that the Taranis patent application number 2018201779 claimed nothing more than the function of the UON GMC (generator), which is the subject of its own earlier patent application,” chairman Mark Keogh said.

UON also provided evidence that the Taranis patent was sought on the basis of confidential information acquired from UON, and expert evidence supporting its argument that the patent specification itself was not sufficient or clear.

“Although UON’s evidence was limited in that it did not include information obtained in the Supreme Court proceedings, Taranis Power has now withdrawn its patent application, with costs set to be awarded to UON.”

In another positive step for UON, its wholly-owned subsidiary LAA industries was last week awarded two standard patents for the generator housing and generator assembly for its power generation products.

Taranis chief executive Joe Vetrone acknowledged UON’s legal wins but said the substantive matter was still to be heard by the Federal Court.

Mr Vetrone said he remained confident Taranis would prevail but had offered to settle the dispute so that both sides did not continue spending money on legal fees.

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