29/05/2013 - 06:55

Today's Headlines

29/05/2013 - 06:55

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.
Today's Headlines

Chevron left short after LNG sale fails

Chevron has quietly been forced to look for a new customer for $30 billion of Gorgon gas after the world's biggest LNG buyer walked out on offtake talks. The West

Green funding rush fires loans row

The Clean Energy Finance Corporation is planning to write up to $800 million in green loans before the election, defying the Coalition’s call for the agency not to sign contracts before September 14 because Tony Abbott has vowed to scrap it. The Aus

Nahan backs gas-guzzling firms over prices

Energy Minister Mike Nahan has gone into bat for some of WA's biggest gas-guzzling firms, saying the government could use its buying muscle to force prices lower for the private sector before a feared shortage hits in 2016. The West

Shell warns on US gas threat

The head of one of the world's biggest energy companies, Royal Dutch Shell, has warned Australia has been slow to react to the impact of the United States shale gas revolution as it weighs up more than $US20 billion of uncommitted spending on liquefied natural gas projects. The Fin

Sugar on ice for Ord scheme

The Chinese company with the green light to develop the next Ord River irrigation scheme says it is likely to grow sorghum for ethanol while weighing up the merits of a Kimberley sugar industry. The West

 

Top Resources Headlines

Chevron left short after LNG sale fails

Chevron has quietly been forced to look for a new customer for $30 billion of Gorgon gas after the world's biggest LNG buyer walked out on offtake talks. The West

Nahan backs gas-guzzling firms over prices

Energy Minister Mike Nahan has gone into bat for some of WA's biggest gas-guzzling firms, saying the government could use its buying muscle to force prices lower for the private sector before a feared shortage hits in 2016. The West

Shell warns on US gas threat

The head of one of the world's biggest energy companies, Royal Dutch Shell, has warned Australia has been slow to react to the impact of the United States shale gas revolution as it weighs up more than $US20 billion of uncommitted spending on liquefied natural gas projects. The Fin

Submissions called for on Fortescue rail charges

Fortescue Metals Group would receive “little financial reward” in return for giving Brockman Mining access to its railway line under Western Australia's access regime, says Credit Suisse analyst Matthew Hope. The Fin

 

Top Politics Headlines

Green funding rush fires loans row

The Clean Energy Finance Corporation is planning to write up to $800 million in green loans before the election, defying the Coalition’s call for the agency not to sign contracts before September 14 because Tony Abbott has vowed to scrap it. The Aus

Political funding row erupts

Federal political parties will begin lining their pockets with millions of dollars in extra public funding well before the September 14 federal election due to a clause which backdates the new payouts to April. The Fin

WA banker pans 50-year bonds

WA's top banker has hosed down calls for state governments to issue 50-year bonds to fund massive infrastructure programs, arguing that there are hidden costs and low demand for such products. The West

Abbott lays down law on baby leave

Tony Abbott has tried to stamp his authority on his party room, insisting that his generous paid parental leave scheme is ‘‘settled Coalition policy’’ as he moved to head off internal unrest and a meeting of Nationals MPs demanding it be junked or stripped back. The Aus

 

Top Property Headlines

Sugar on ice for Ord scheme

The Chinese company with the green light to develop the next Ord River irrigation scheme says it is likely to grow sorghum for ethanol while weighing up the merits of a Kimberley sugar industry. The West

Rule change for council merger vote

A law that allows electors to veto a local council amalgamation is set to be watered down as the Barnett government attempts to push ahead with merger plans. The West

WA leads nation in retail growth

WA continues to lead the nation in retail turnover with growth of 9 per cent year-on-year to February, according to a market overview by Jones Lang La Salle. The West

WA keeps pace in lucrative green race

The greening of Perth's office market is delivering financial returns to building owners with a new report showing buildings with high environmental ratings have lower vacancies than their unimproved counterparts. The West

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Senior Princess Margaret Hospital doctors say critical shortages of staff and beds in key specialities such as cancer and immunology will not improve when the new children's hospital opens.

Page 3: WA Police will flood areas around pubs, clubs, hotels and liquor stores this long weekend to crack down on drink-driving, saying the WA Day break has become a “party weekend”.

Page 4: Qantas is about to sign a multimillion-dollar joint marketing deal with Tourism WA to promote what it calls one of the world's great destinations.

Wesfarmers chief executive Richard Goyder is hopeful the conglomerate will seek out new acquisitions offshore in the years ahead.

Page 6: Fishing restrictions or bans off Perth's northern coastline may be broadened after Environment Minister Albert Jacob flagged a possible shake-up of the state's oldest and most recognised marine park.

Page 7: The head of the Pilbara Development Commission wants WA miners to do more to encourage workers to buy and not rent in the Pilbara.

Page 9: The Chinese company with the green light to develop the next Ord River irrigation scheme says it is likely to grow sorghum for ethanol while weighing up the merits of a Kimberley sugar industry.

Page 10: Water Minister Terry Redman has reminded households to switch off their reticulation ahead of this Saturday's start of the winter sprinkler ban despite a big fall in the number of people breaking the rules.

Page 11: The Education Department paid out more than #38 million in workers compensation last year to teachers and other staff for work-related injuries, illnesses and stress.

Page 12: Laws that lump taxpayers with a $40 million bill for political parties' activities will be backdated to April 1 – allowing Labor and the coalition to supercharge their election war chests as soon as legislation passes Parliament.

Page 13: A former laboratory worker who swapped urine samples for mine workers was sentenced to 12 months jail yesterday after a District Court judge warned the industry could be significantly harmed if the rigging of drug and alcohol tests became widespread.

Page 15: WA has signed up to a funding partnership to boost services for the homeless – two weeks after being outed by the Federal Government and care groups for lagging on the deal.

Page 16: The dollar is falling, the resources sector is losing steam and Canberra is on the nose – but Australia remains the world's happiest rich nation.

Page 17: Almost 1.3 million West Australians will be slugged extra for hospital cover after the Opposition agreed to rein in spending on the private health insurance rebate.

Page 20: A law that allows electors to veto a local council amalgamation is set to be watered down as the Barnett government attempts to push ahead with merger plans.

Page 27: Three months after major roadworks finished on Great Eastern Highway, it is a mixed bag for businesses hurt by about 20 months of disruptions.

Business: Chevron has quietly been forced to look for a new customer for $30 billion of Gorgon gas after the world's biggest LNG buyer walked out on offtake talks.

Energy Minister Mike Nahan has gone into bat for some of WA's biggest gas-guzzling firms, saying the government could use its buying muscle to force prices lower for the private sector before a feared shortage hits in 2016.

Norilsk Nickel's Australian operations slipped deeper into trouble after a mystery contractor launched action to wind up its major Australian operating subsidiary over $1.8 million in unpaid bills.

WA's top banker has hosed down calls for state governments to issue 50-year bonds to fund massive infrastructure programs, arguing that there are hidden costs and low demand for such products.

Santos has flagged the prospect of the Caldita-Barossa gas field in the Timor Sea becoming the latest FLNG development.

Woodside Petroleum is working on a technology that would allow it to build LNG plants on top of barges, avoiding the need for costly port developments.

WA continues to lead the nation in retail turnover with growth of 9 per cent year-on-year to February, according to a market overview by Jones Lang La Salle

The greening of Perth's office market is delivering financial returns to building owners with a new report showing buildings with high environmental ratings have lower vacancies than their unimproved counterparts.

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Federal political parties will begin lining their pockets with millions of dollars in extra public funding well before the September 14 federal election due to a clause which backdates the new payouts to April.

The head of one of the world's biggest energy companies, Royal Dutch Shell, has warned Australia has been slow to react to the impact of the United States shale gas revolution as it weighs up more than $US20 billion of uncommitted spending on liquefied natural gas projects.

Page 3: Australia risks being considered an “outlier” by the international community if it diverts more overseas aid to housing asylum seekers, according to the world's richest man and philanthropist, Bill Gates.

Page 4: Tony Abbott has sought to silence growing internal dissent over his controversial paid parental leave scheme by asserting the decision to proceed with the policy as set in stone and insisting most women, including farmer's wives, would benefit.

Page 8: Australia's two decades of economic prosperity, which may be unprecedented in any developed nation's history, has entrenched a political culture ill-equipped to cope with a coming post-boom downturn, according to prominent economist Ross Garnaut.

Page 11: Telstra has announced a national audit into the work practices of contractors working on the national broadband network after media reports of mishandled asbestos.

Page 12: A new profile of Australian exporters shows how tough conditions have been under the strong currency, how much relief could come as the dollar falls and also underlines the claims of services companies for more government strategic support.

Nationals Senator Barnaby Joyce is pushing for a government-imposed mandatory code of conduct to regulate the allegedly bullying behaviour by large retailers in the $86 billion grocery market.

Page 13: New BHP Billiton chief executive Andrew Mackenzie has taken his cost-cutting message to the coal face, touring the company's Queensland mines and meeting with local government and community leaders in the Bowen Basin as he attempts to improve productivity across the business.

Page 15: Qantas Airways chief executive Alan Joyce is confident the airline can significantly grow the amount of aircraft seats it offers Western Australian travellers despite the resources boom cooling.

Page 16: Fortescue Metals Group would receive “little financial reward” in return for giving Brockman Mining access to its railway line under Western Australia's access regime, says Credit Suisse analyst Matthew Hope.

Woolworths has unveiled another round of “permanent” price reductions on hundreds of grocery products in a bid to boost foot traffic and sales.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: The Clean Energy Finance Corporation is planning to write up to $800 million in green loans before the election, defying the Coalition’s call for the agency not to sign contracts before September 14 because Tony Abbott has vowed to scrap it.

Telstra will conduct an audit into the risky asbestos-handling procedures employed by workers involved in the rollout of the National Broadband Network, amid concerns several hundred residents and schoolchildren — as well as many of the project’s contractors — have been exposed to the deadly fibres.

Page 2: The building details of ASIO’s new headquarters in Canberra, allegedly hacked by Chinese cyber spies, were stolen three years ago and no longer pose any threat to the agency’s operations.

Page 3: Woolworths has fired the latest salvo in the supermarket price war, slashing hundreds of grocery items by as much as 33 per cent as arch-rival Coles said it was already selling at the lower prices.

Page 4: Julia Gillard will be confronted with a motion to caucus in two weeks that will call for the Labor leader’s power to pick the frontbench to be removed and handed back to federal MPs.

Proposals to enshrine wide-ranging and detailed funding formulas in legislation for the Gonski education changes is hardening state and non-government school opposition to Labor’s six-year plan.

The Gillard government will deregulate high-performing universities, in a policy U-turn to be announced this morning.

Page 5: Tony Abbott has tried to stamp his authority on his party room, insisting that his generous paid parental leave scheme is ‘‘settled Coalition policy’’ as he moved to head off internal unrest and a meeting of Nationals MPs demanding it be junked or stripped back.

The Coalition has begun a stoush with Aboriginal land councils by promising, if elected, to devolve some of their functions to indigenous community organisations.

The disability and aged-care workforce, already one of the fastest-growing in Australia, will need to expand by a fifth in the next four years as major Labor reforms worth billions power up.

Page 6: North Queensland pastoralists will today appeal personally to Wayne Swan to authorise the purchase of 100,000 drought-stricken cattle to save the starving stock from being shot.

A government laboratory assistant helped West Australian mine workers pass mandatory workplace drug tests by substituting their urine samples.

Business: Federal and state governments face new demands to privatise hundreds of billions of dollars worth of their assets from superannuation funds that say they are investing in offshore electricity, water and telecommunications even though Australia is facing a $770 billion infrastructure shortfall.

Mining equipment giant Caterpillar has turned to computer vision technology developed by Canberra’s Seeing Machines to help mining companies around the world stop weary mine haul truck drivers from falling asleep at the wheel with an in-cab computer that watches their facial and eye movements.

Communications minister Stephen Conroy will today outline the development of the government’s policy to develop the use of the cloud as a key part of its National Digital Economy Strategy.

The move into financial services by technology giants such as Google and PayPal may have to be examined by regulators to ensure all institutions have appropriate systems, according to the chief of Australia’s largest bank, CBA.

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce says the national carrier sees no signs of an end to the mining boom in Western Australia, with the airline continuing to expand its services in the state.

 

The Daily Telegraph

Page 1: A Sydney man who allegedly threatened an intelligence officer has been under surveillance since he was 19. Kevin Rudd backers have been accused of trying to destabilise Labor leader Julia Gillard again, less than four months out from the federal election.

Page 2: Prime ministerial hopeful Clive Palmer has plagiarised Liberal policies in his pitch to voters.

Page 3: Author and former rugby international Peter FitzSimons has denied getting drunk at a cancer charity fundraiser he was being paid to host.

Business: Industry superannuation funds say they could bankroll new infrastructure in Australia to the tune of $15 billion over five years - or $100 billion, if retail super funds were to join in.

Sport: NSW coach Laurie Daley says he doesn't know if it will be Josh Reynolds or John Sutton who fills his interchange role for the Blues.

The Sydney Morning Herald

Page 1: The prime minister has shifted $2 billion earmarked for the Parramatta-Epping rail line into a fund for projects not to be built until after 2019.

Page 2: Australia has topped an OECD survey of what constitutes good living for the third year running - but 14 per cent of us work more than 50 hours a week.

Page 3: A Sydney man under investigation for alleged terrorism offences has been charged over alleged threats to a commonwealth official.

World: The European Union will lift an embargo on the provision of arms to Syria's opposition fighters, and the US is under pressure to do the same.

Business: Gas company Santos has accused environmental groups opposing coal seam gas exploration of exacerbating a looming energy supply "crisis" in NSW.

Sport: New Zealand netball chief executive Raelene Castle is expected to be confirmed as the Bulldogs CEO.

 

The Age

Page 1: In a massive overhaul of the taxi industry, Victorians will get cheaper offpeak fares but pay more on Friday and Saturday nights. Eleven victims of the of paedophile Christian Brother Robert Best have won more than $1 million in compensation from the Catholic order.

Page 2: Coalition carbon plans will deliver less than five per cent of the emission cuts assumed under its direct-action climate change policy, according to departmental estimates.

Page 3: Melbourne Grammar warns families to beware of strangers after two students were approached by a man who sped away when he saw one of their parents. Nature strip reborn as a kinetic sculpture park. Five Victorian towns to get $350,000 each for year-long creative projects.

World: European Union to lift its embargo on Syria's rebel fighters.

Business: Cabcharge shares tumble after the Victorian government pressures monopoly payment company to slash fees on electronic payments for its 5000 cabs.

Sport: Melbourne coach Mark Neeld could go as early as next Monday's board meeting as the club's continues to be pounded on the field.

 

 

The Herald Sun

Page 1: Radical taxi reforms could mean a 40km trip could cost almost $100 on Friday and Saturday nights but passengers can expect more cabs and better service in exchange for the fare jump. Show ponies strut their stuff at the Werribee three-day event.

Page 2: Legal Aid turned over more than 100 staff in the past financial year, running up a $3.1 million deficit. An alert garbage truck driver has saved the life of a curious 10-year-old boy who hid in a garbage bin to see what it was like inside the compactor.

Page 3: A 66-year-old used car salesman scammed more than $600,000 from friends to feed his pokies addiction, court told. Ruby has overcome tumour the size of a football inside her tiny chest cavity and is now on the road to recovery. Muslim who threatened to slit the throat of an intelligence officer arrested.

World: Up to 70 killed in a wave of car bombings through mostly Shi'ite Muslim neighbourhoods in Baghdad.

Business: Commonwealth Bank chief says global titans such as Google and Apple are as big a threat to the bank as rival big four lenders.

Sport: Collingwood coach Nathan Buckley says Heath Shaw's weight contributed to him missing last Friday's game against Sydney. 

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options