21/11/2011 - 06:52

Today's Business Headlines

21/11/2011 - 06:52

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Union lobs new Qantas strike threat – The Aus; SBY, Gillard tread path of reconciliation – The Aus; Rain fails to dampen bumper grain harvest – The West; Super next front in mine tax war – The Aus; No fanfare as Trahar makes quiet exit from Kresta – The West

Today's Business Headlines

Union lobs new Qantas strike threat

Negotiations in the damaging Qantas dispute were on the verge of collapse last night, after the Transport Workers Union revived threats to try to resume strike action against the airline. The Aus

SBY, Gillard tread path of reconciliation

Julia Gillard and Indonesia’s Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono are rebooting the bilateral relationship after a difficult 12 months, roiled by the live cattle ban, disagreement over asylum-seeker policy and Jakarta’s initial unease about the agreement to deploy US marines and aircraft in northern Australia. The Aus

Rain fails to dampen bumper grain harvest

WA farmers are on track to reap the second-biggest harvest on record as operations at major receival depots across the state move into high gear. The West

Super next front in mine tax war

Business has opened a new front in its battle with the Gillard government over the mining tax, launching a rearguard action against its plan to use the revenue to increase employer superannuation levies by up to $20 billion a year. The Aus

No fanfare as Trahar makes quiet exit from Kresta

Less than two years after emerging on the register of window coverings maker Kresta Holdings, Ian Trahar has cut ties with the company. The West

 

THE WEST AUSTRALIAN:

Page 4: The Gillard government is increasingly confident it will drive the mining tax through Parliament within days as it intensifies pressure on wavering independents for their support.

Page 5: West Australians would be legally required to indicate whether they wanted to become an organ donor when applying for a driver's licence under proposed laws to be introduced to state Parliament this week.

Page 9: The union representing rail transit guards has pounced on a savage attack that left two workers in hospital as evidence that train stations have become increasingly unsafe.

A drug expert has called on businesses to follow the lead of resources giants which have banned alcohol in their Perth offices as well as regional sites.

Page 10: The Transport Workers Union has threatened to take the validity of last month's Qantas grounding to the Federal Court if the airline does not support a 21-day extension to negotiations before tonight's deadline imposed by Fair Work Australia.

Page 12: Labor stalwart John Faulkner declared yesterday that the ALP was a declining political force badly in need of reform as his Left faction met and agreed on a defiant policy agenda to take to next month's national conference.

Page 17: Tony Abbott has demanded Julia Gillard extend the parliamentary sitting next year and deliver a mini-budget filled with spending cuts.

Page 18: WA farmers are on track to reap the second-biggest harvest on record as operations at major receival depots across the state move into high gear.

Business: Reid Hoffman, LinkedIn co-founder and significant Facebook investor, says Mark Zuckerberg will choose to float his company early next year in what could be the biggest consumer technology public offering in history.

Less than two years after emerging on the register of window coverings maker Kresta Holdings, Ian Trahar has cut ties with the company.

ANZ is about to settle its $350 million fight with Primebroker Securities, the Melbourne-based margin lending company that collapsed in 2008 amid the worst of the global financial crisis.

 

THE AUSTRALIAN:

Page 1: Negotiations in the damaging Qantas dispute were on the verge of collapse last night, after the Transport Workers Union revived threats to try to resume strike action against the airline.

Business has opened a new front in its battle with the Gillard government over the mining tax, launching a rearguard action against its plan to use the revenue to increase employer superannuation levies by up to $20 billion a year.

Julia Gillard and Indonesia’s Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono are rebooting the bilateral relationship after a difficult 12 months, roiled by the live cattle ban, disagreement over asylum-seeker policy and Jakarta’s initial unease about the agreement to deploy US marines and aircraft in northern Australia.

Page 2: The Labor Left has set the scene for a fiery national conference, resolving to confront Julia Gillard on gay marriage, asylum-seekers and the sale of uranium to India.

The government faces a potentially embarrassing parliamentary inquiry into the Australia Network tender fiasco, with the Senate set to vote on its establishment this week.

Julia Gillard is facing a battle from the crossbench to amend her $11.1 billion mining tax in favour of smaller miners in a move that could cost hundreds of millions of dollars in forecast revenue.

NBN Co is facing pressure to urgently release a new corporate plan to inform taxpayers about the impact of prolonged negotiations on its multi-billion-dollar deal with Telstra and other delays to the rollout.

Page 4: Twenty employer groups are calling for the Productivity Commission to conduct an imminent review of Labor’s Fair Work Act, claiming changes are required to combat rising union power and higher costs hitting business.

Page 6: Tony Abbott has called the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ‘‘less dogmatic’’ in its latest study of the science of extreme weather.

Page 8: Barack Obama has succeeded in hauling a maritime dispute into an Asian summit despite China’s objections, in a diplomatic victory to end his Pacific tour.

Page 9: Australian officials are hoping for a boost to Australia’s trade with Indonesia following the removal of the vast majority of tariffs between the two countries.

Business: Former ANZ Bank chief executive John Mcfarlane, eyeing the financial storm engulfing Europe, has urged Australian banks to resist risky activities as they chase growth in a ‘‘constrained’’ domestic market.

New superannuation rules have alarmed private equity companies, who fear a new focus on low fees will stop fund managers investing in their funds at a time when the industry is already facing a complex tax environment and reputational issues.

Gold is having its day in the sun and, while many juniors scramble to cash in on this unique opportunity, Focus Minerals is pushing ahead with an aggressive growth strategy, increasing its production of the precious metal immediately and significantly.

BC Iron managing director Mike Young says the company is considering diversifying into other commodities after being inundated with offers of more than $100 million in debt financing.

China's economic spokespeople have stressed in the past few days the country’s sense of responsibility: that it is fighting an often lonely battle to keep the global economy on track, in the face of mostly negative new data.

Another volatile week in local markets is likely as Europe grapples with its debt contagion and the US struggles to make progress on its deficit-reduction program.

Chi-X’S share of trading volumes has edged through 2 per cent for the first time, with brokers executing 13,202 trades worth $42.1 million on Friday afternoon as the ASX’S new rival continues its slow expansion.

The European Central Bank and Germany firmly rejected calls from eurozone politicians to bail out Italy and other struggling euro members by intervening massively in bond markets, insisting that the central bank’s credibility rests on its political independence and focus on fighting inflation.

 

THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD:

Page 1: An Afghan commander has asked the Australian government to withdraw its troops immediately, but has asked that they leave behind some military equipment. The NSW government has called for a report into the screening of nursing home staff following a fatal fire at Quakers Hill.

Page 2: The NSW government has been accused of cutting police numbers to meet budget savings. Almost $60 million has been wiped from the value of NuCoal Resources, following the push for an Independent Commission Against Corruption investigation.

Page 3: Qantas is set to meet unions to resolve the bitter dispute that resulted in the fleet's grounding last month. Many Australian children are too inactive, a survey of 8000 students has found.

World: The International Criminal Court has called on Libya's transitional government to hand over Muammar Gaddafi's son Seif al-Islam.

Business: ANZ Bank is reportedly considering a settlement offer to settle its legal dispute with Primebroker Securities. Union representatives on the creditors committee don't know how much the administrators have made from the Ansett collapse.

Sport: Tiger Woods wins the Presidents Cup by defeating Aaron Baddeley.

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH:

Page 1: Crown Prince Frederik and Princess Mary visit Sculpture By The Sea in Bondi. NSW police have charged 24 alleged rapists in cases dating back up to 25 years using DNA samples on evidence kept in cold storage.

Page 2: Four C-130 Hercules will be given to Indonesia for disaster relief and humanitarian work, with three naval vessels deployed to launch an attack against people smugglers. More than 58,000 foreigners are illegally staying in Australia.

Page 3: Actress Rachel Taylor arrives home a day before interview with troubled ex-boyfriend Matthew Newton is aired. Premier Barry O'Farrell orders a review into staff screening processes, following Quakers Hill nursing home fire.

World: Libya's interim government says Muammar Gaddafi's son Seif al-Islam will get a fair trial, following his capture.

Finance: Geoff Roberts has accepted the role of Victorian managing partner for Deloitte.

Sport: Darren Lockyer says goodbye as he strengthens his claim as the best player of his generation by leading Australia to victory.

 

THE AGE:

Page 1: Australian soldier tells how he survived the shooting at morning parade by a rogue Afghan soldier that killed three of his mates.

Indonesian PM suggests to Julia Gillard that Australian and US troops conduct military exercises with China.

Mental hospital hit by more claims of sex assaults on patients. Labor Left to tackle Gillard at ALP annual conference on gay marriage, refugees and selling uranium to India.

Page 2: Afghan chief says diggers should go home but leave the heavy weapons behind.

Page 3: Greens bill would ban wrist X-rays to decide age of asylum seekers. Serious health and safety issues raised at chicken plant under siege from striking staff.

Dairy farms on the comeback in Victoria. Baillieu apologises after saying Sir Rod Eddington's $5 billion rail plan drawn up on back of an envelope.

World: Republicans and Democrats concede there is no chance for congressional committee to come up with $1.2 trillion in savings by midnight on Wednesday.

Business: ANZ close to settling its $350 million legal fight with GFC victim Primebroker Securities.

Sport: US wins Presidents Cup.

 

THE HERALD SUN:

Page 1: Tiger Woods and his US teammates hold off a charge by the internationals to win the Presidents Cup. 60,000 illegal immigrants in Australia should be sent packing.

Page 2: Five-year-old son of Socceroo Brad Jones loses his fight with leukaemia. Nurses dispute drags into 10th day with more beds closed.

Page 3: Princess Mary may be Danish royalty but she's still an Aussie at heart. Melbourne-bound train runs out of fuel stranding passengers for three hours.

World: New documentary concludes Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in killing JFK.

Business: Yellow Pages fading but Telstra's mobile phone and internet picking up business.

Sport: Tiger takes a shot at Greg Norman for criticising his selection in the US Presidents Cup team.

THE CANBERRA TIMES:

Page 1: Carbon price to add $60 million to the cost of federal government operations.

Page 2: ACT government approves 100 apartments at Kingston Forsehore.

Page 3: Tests have not ruined Indonesian ties: Gillard.

World: Egypt protests reignited.

Business: Europe's woes to weigh on market.

Sport: Tiger seals Presidents Cup win.

THE COURIER MAIL:

Page 1: There are enough illegal immigrants living in Australia to populate a large regional city.

Page 3: Qantas passengers could face further disruption with one of the unions locked in a wages war with the airline threatening more strikes.

Page 4 & 5: Gladstone fishermen are falling on tough times because Gladstone Harbour water is contaminated.

World: Syrian president Bashar al-Assad has vowed to fight to the death against protesters, ignoring an Arab League deadline to stop the bloodshed in his country.

Business: Investors are more confused about the European debt crisis as stock prices slide back to where they were last month.

Sport: Australia was spurred to its Four Nations final win by a stirring tribute video about retiring skipper Darren Lockyer.

THE ADELAIDE ADVERTISER:

Page 1: There are 13 times more illegal immigrants arriving in planes than there are asylum seekers in boats.

Page 3: Shoppers have backed extended public holiday trading in the suburbs.

World: Egypt's riot police have clashed with protesters in Cairo.

Business: Economists are increasingly questioning the relevance of the Eurozone rescue fund.

Sport: Tiger Woods has clinched the Presidents Cup for the US.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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