29/03/2006 - 13:57

Survey finds skills shortages the key barrier to growth

29/03/2006 - 13:57

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A new survey of minerals industry professionals has provided further evidence that skills shortages are a major obstacle to industry growth.

Survey finds skills shortages the key barrier to growth


A new survey of minerals industry professionals has provided further evidence that skills shortages are a major obstacle to industry growth.
The Macquarie Securities and the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM) survey of over 1,300 minerals industry professionals revealed that skills shortages is viewed as the key factor for both industry profitability and future growth prospects.
The survey findings are also consistent with research conducted by the Chamber of Minerals and Energy, according to Chief Executive, Tim Shanahan.
"Whist the survey was not specifically designed to study skill shortages and its effects on the industry, it has indirectly confirmed the severity of the issue and reinforced findings of previous CME research on skill shortages", Mr Shanahan said.
"Over the last two years, CME has worked on a number of fronts to tackle skill shortages, with the latest being the launch of our careers marketing campaign."
"We are participating with the Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) and the Australian Government on the National Skills Shortages Strategy (NSSS) project for the Australian minerals industry. CME is project manager of this major two-year research project of national significance."
"Other CME initiatives revolve around activities within secondary school education, vocation education and training, university education and skilled migration."
"We need to think outside the box in our recruitment strategies. Skilled people from non-traditional resources sector labour markets, such as India, can add great value to our industry."
"Skilled migration has its place but education and training remains CME's long term strategy to ensure a continual stream of skilled people entering the resources sector", Mr Shanahan concluded.

 

 

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NEW SURVEY FINDS SKILLS SHORTAGES THE KEY BARRIER TO GROWTH
29 March 2006

A new survey of minerals industry professionals has provided yet more evidence of the significance of skills shortages as an obstacle to industry growth.
The survey of over 1,300 minerals industry professionals, conducted for Macquarie Securities and the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM), revealed that skills shortages is viewed as the key issue having a detrimental impact on both industry profitability and future growth prospects.
The survey findings are consistent with research conducted by the Chamber of Minerals and Energy, according to Chief Executive, Tim Shanahan.
"Whist the survey was not specifically designed to study skill shortages and its effects on the industry, it has indirectly confirmed the severity of the issue and reinforced findings of previous CME research on skill shortages", Mr Shanahan said.
"Over the last two years, CME has worked on a number of fronts to tackle skill shortages, with the latest being the launch of our careers marketing campaign."
"We are participating with the Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) and the Australian Government on the National Skills Shortages Strategy (NSSS) project for the Australian minerals industry. CME is project manager of this major two-year research project of national significance."
"Other CME initiatives revolve around activities within secondary school education, vocation education and training, university education and skilled migration."
"We need to think outside the box in our recruitment strategies. Skilled people from non-traditional resources sector labour markets, such as India, can add great value to our industry."
"Skilled migration has its place but education and training remains CME's long term strategy to ensure a continual stream of skilled people entering the resources sector", Mr Shanahan concluded.

 

 

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