State govt campaign to cut red tape

23/09/2015 - 15:03

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The state government has invited the public to have a say on red tape reform through its #ShredTheRed campaign, while highlighting a number of efficiency improvements in the transport sector.

State govt campaign to cut red tape
Finance Minister Bill Marmion (left) with Transport Minister Dean Nalder. Photo: Attila Csaszar

The state government has invited the public to have a say on red tape reform through its #ShredTheRed campaign, while highlighting a number of efficiency improvements in the transport sector.

Finance Minister Bill Marmion said the #ShredTheRed initiative was one that the community could get behind and tell the government what was going wrong in terms of efficiency in business and in their lives.

“We will then look at all that and see if we can reduce (the red tape burdens),” he said.

“We are going to be concentrating on a number of areas, including housing approvals, licensing of businesses, liquor licensing, transport and we will also be mapping the processes that people need to go through to get certain approvals, which will also help show what roadblocks are in the way.

“We’re going to focus on small business first ... there are lots of little things we can do to help small business.” 

Mr Marmion said each minister was working in their particular area to address the need for red tape cuts.

“Red tape costs WA up to $12 billion a year, so it is important all sectors of industry and government agencies work together to reduce this impost on the state’s economy,” he said.

Highlighting red tape cuts in the transport sector, Transport Minister Dean Nalder said businesses would be able to process vehicle registrations and update details online by the end of the year.

He said it would improve efficiencies for all businesses, but particularly for the transport sector which will help spur productivity.

“We want to reduce red tape for businesses, cut their administrative burden and lower their costs,” Mr Nalder said.

“About 40 billion tonnes of freight are transported by road in WA each year, so it’s important to ensure hurdles are removed so the industry can function efficiently.

“This approach also helps keep down prices for consumers.”

Mr Nalder said obtaining a heavy vehicle permit now took about one day in WA, compared with up to two months in the eastern states.

The Department of Transport has formed a new one-stop-shop for the heavy vehicle industry for the processing of permits, rather than having to deal with four separate agencies.

It has also replaced two common permits for restricted access vehicles with a single gazette notice, removed a $50 fee and formed a new team of traffic escort wardens, allowing police to return to frontline duties.

The department also announced new pullover and layover bays to allow for more efficient changeovers, while the DoTDirect online vehicle registration (currently available to individuals) will be made available to businesses by the end of the year.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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