16/01/2018 - 14:45

Stadium crowd cap yet to be decided

16/01/2018 - 14:45

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The state government will determine the extent of a cap on crowd attendance at Optus Stadium for a potential Big Bash League semi-final after this weekend’s community day, which will help it determine the capacity of public transport to move big crowds to and from the 60,000-seat stadium.

Stadium crowd cap yet to be decided
The government has received advice suggesting a cap for Optus Stadium. Photo: Attila Csaszar

The state government will determine the extent of a cap on crowd attendance at Optus Stadium for a potential Big Bash League semi-final after this weekend’s community day, which will help it determine the capacity of public transport to move big crowds to and from the 60,000-seat stadium.

Transport Minister Rita Saffioti said today the advice she received recommended a cap on crowd numbers if the Perth Scorchers were to host the midweek BBL semi-final, given the constraints on the public transport system along with construction delays on the Matagraup Bridge, which is designed to bring thousands of pedestrians to the venue from East Perth.

If Perth hosts a semi-final, it would take place at 4pm mid-week in order for east coast viewers to watch the match live.

It has been reported the crowd would be limited to 45,000, but Ms Saffioti said the government was still exploring options.

"During these hours the buses and trains are being used in the wider network, hence the system simply does not have the capacity without the bridge," she said.

"We will evaluate how the transport system operates on the community open day and One Day International before deciding on an appropriate cap in consultation with transport agencies, Optus Stadium and Cricket Australia.

"We will do whatever we can to ensure we get as many people as possible to the game."

The PTA is planning for around 14,300 people to use the footbridge, which is set to be completed in May.  

Ms Saffioti will discuss other possible solutions when she meets with WACA chief executive Christina Matthews and the Department of Transport and Perth Transport Authority within the next few days.

Opposition leader Mike Nahan said it was always going to be a challenge to encourage Western Australians to use public transport and walk rather than drive.

He has also warned that action may be taken against the government for failing to finish the footbridge, as the ticket cap could deny revenue to the stadium's owners.

The government has also copped criticism for not providing a pick-up and drop-off zone at the venue and prohibiting ride-sharing services, such as Uber, from accessing the stadium.

Attendance has been staggered for this weekend's public opening, which is expected to attract 110,000 people to the venue.

There will be additional train and bus services on all lines running from 7.30am to 10pm.

About 15,000 ticket holders will tour the stadium in one-hour time slots from 8am to 9pm, with a further 95,000 people to access the general admission area.

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