Sapien backs in CI amendments

02/05/2022 - 14:00

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Sapien Cyber has come out in support of recently enacted changes to the nation’s critical infrastructure laws, arguing businesses have nothing to fear from increased obligations.

Sapien backs in CI amendments
Changes to the Critical Infrastructure Act came into effect in April. Photo: Philipp Katzenberger/Unsplash

Sapien Cyber has come out in support of recently enacted changes to the nation’s critical infrastructure laws, arguing businesses have nothing to fear from increased obligations.

Amendments to the Security of Critical Infrastructure Act 2018 came into effect in April, with operators of nationally significant systems required to maintain risk management programs as well as meet cyber security obligations.

The changes, which have drawn comparisons to similar laws controversially enacted in the US after 9/11, have drawn a variety of opponents, including the ACTU.

In its initial committee submission, it argued for a clearer review process involving the Administrative Appeals Tribunal, narrower definitions of employees or personnel deemed critical and subject to oversight, as well carve outs for existing industrial protections.

Ai Group argued similarly that the breadth of entities covered by the legislation would place an inordinate reporting burden on companies with diversified interests or small- to medium-sized enterprises.

Sapien’s chief technology officer Michael Counsel dismissed much of this criticism, arguing the reporting standards enacted would only affect those businesses that did not make an effort to protect infrastructure deemed to be in the public interest.

“If you don’t want the government meddling in your business, all you have to do is make sure you’ve got the right cybersecurity and safeguards in place,” he said.

“It’s really a matter of perspective.”

Drawing a comparison with the US Patriot Act, Mr Counsel said Australia’s laws gave businesses the choice to avoid government intervention through protecting infrastructure on their own accord.

He said businesses should act wisely on this front.

“That means focusing on building up our sovereign capability, ensuring their security systems are Australian owned and operated, and limiting the exposure of our critical operations to insecure or unknown international parties.”

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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