11/08/2021 - 14:30

Proteomics to co-develop endometriosis test

11/08/2021 - 14:30

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Perth-based Proteomics International has partnered with the University of Melbourne and the Royal Women’s Hospital to develop a non-invasive blood test for endometriosis.

A collaboration that includes Proteomics is planning to develop the world's first blood test for endometriosis. Photo: Proteomics

Perth-based Proteomics International Laboratories has partnered with the University of Melbourne and the Royal Women’s Hospital to develop a non-invasive blood test for endometriosis.

The organisations are planning to develop the world's first blood test for endometriosis - a chronic condition affecting female reproductive systems - using samples from more than 900 women.

Proteomics says it will use its Promarker technology platform and the clinical databases of its partners to develop the test.

Managing director Richard Lipscombe called attention to the need for more research into endometriosis.

On average, it takes between seven and 12 years to diagnose the condition, due to a lack of tests.

The current system of detection is an invasive laparoscopy, a surgical procedure where a camera is inserted into the pelvis through a small incision in the abdominal wall.

The collaboration, announced today, will build on a previous study by Proteomics, which identified protein 'fingerprints' in the blood - called biomarkers - that can be used to test for endometriosis.

"We’re excited to pair our Promarker technology platform - which has already been used to develop the world’s first predictive diagnostic test for diabetic kidney disease - with the University of Melbourne and Royal Women’s Hospital’s exceptional clinical database and expertise in this field," Dr Lipscombe said.

"It is exciting to think we could develop a world first blood test for diagnosing endometriosis.”

Royal Women's Hospital director of research Peter Rogers and endometriosis researcher Sarah Holdsworth-Carson said the new testing system would save women from years of suffering. 

“Endometriosis symptoms often start when women are teenagers, but because it’s so hard to diagnose, girls can struggle with unexplained pain throughout their lives," they said.

"We’re hoping to prevent this with a simple, accessible blood test that can be ordered by a family GP.”

The organisations will also research new biomarkers for the disease.

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