15/02/2005 - 21:00

Pick of the crop recognised

15/02/2005 - 21:00

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Our 40under40 Awards have been announced and yet another group of worthy people have been recognised for their achievements – not only in business but across many other fields where entrepreneurialism and innovation thrives.

Our 40under40 Awards have been announced and yet another group of worthy people have been recognised for their achievements – not only in business but across many other fields where entrepreneurialism and innovation thrives.

This year I was not a judge, so I can’t give you the insights of those who took on the task – though I am glad to see another broad ranging group of winners step forward to receive their awards

A review of the winners’ list and the backgrounds we have published reveals a number of themes this year.

Biotechnology is clearly prevalent, which is a good sign for our medical research sector and, hopefully, shows that it is thriving at the moment.

Another noticeable group of entrants are mine managers. We’ve had resources CEOs and mining contractors before but it is heartening to see some of those who take on huge challenges of operational mining in our regions are able to put their hand up to be recognised for their achievements.

Finally, there are a few more professional services players than usual.

It is not easy to make it into the 40under40 from these ranks – and I must note that I am sure a lawyer has yet to make it – but this year’s winners are people who have taken risks to create something different.

Since 2002 we have listed 160 winners in these pages and many have gone on with their careers in a way that the founders of 40under40 envisaged.

One notable from the first year of 40under40 is Andrew Thorburn who, I noticed recently, joined National Australia Bank as head of retail banking for Australia in January.

Mr Thorburn was the energetic WA manager for Commonwealth Bank when he won the award and then moved on to head retail business for St George Bank nationally.

Now he is one of a new breed at NAB trying to restore it to its position as undeniably the nation’s premier bank.

More power to conspiracy theories

There is nothing like a good conspiracy theory to get a journalist moving.

So when it was suggested to me that all the power blackouts appeared to be occurring in districts that seem to lie in safe Labor seats, my ears pricked up.

What a suggestion. That the State Government could not afford to see power cuts in marginal seats where they were fighting to keep power or Liberal seats, which would give the Opposition further ammunition.

Imagine if its most loyal supporters were suffering the most.

It certainly appeared so when you look at the suburbs that had blackouts on February 15 – Girrawheen, Armadale and even Victoria Park, the premier’s own electorate.

Well, naturally, I was disappointed to hear from Western Power that the blackouts are random, created by power pole issues (pole top fires etc) during humid conditions rather than the fickle hand of electoral need.

Another good conspiracy theory laid to rest – or is it?

Poll date indecision could prove costly

Continuing on the power issue, it is worth noting that all these problems – real and/or hyped up for political consumption – are occurring at or around the time of last year’s dreadful blackouts.

With that in mind, I never believed that Geoff Gallop would risk having an election campaign at this time of year and was quite surprised he left it as late as he did.

Admittedly there was the hangover of the federal election and the political implosion of Mark Latham, which muddied the waters of those trying to read the electoral tea leaves.

But that indecision may prove costly, as voters start to wonder why they haven’t got power at the hottest time of the year – even if it is just for a few hours.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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