14/03/2006 - 21:00

Parking an issue for quay

14/03/2006 - 21:00

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Fremantle businesses used an audio-visual presentation last week by developer ING Real Estate and project architects Cox Howlett & Bailey Woodland to voice concerns over the proposed $200 million Victoria Quay redevelopment.

Parking an issue for quay

Fremantle businesses used an audio-visual presentation last week by developer ING Real Estate and project architects Cox Howlett & Bailey Woodland to voice concerns over the proposed $200 million Victoria Quay redevelopment.

The concept provides for an integrated development of restored heritage buildings and suggests new opportunities for business, including 25,000 square metres of commercial and professional office space together with 12,000sq m of retail, restaurant and cafe space.

Among the concerns of small business representatives at the AV meeting were future commercial space requirements in Fremantle, and the potential for small operators to be edged out of the race for office leases at Victoria Quay by larger tenants.

In addition, one participant offered a colourful critique of the redevelopment’s red crane design feature, while the distance of the precinct to major tourist areas in the city was also highlighted.

Parking demands of the two million additional people expected to visit to Fremantle each year after the quay’s construction also looks set to be a hot topic during the five weeks of community consultation.

Gary Hanstead, general manager of marketing and industry for Rottnest Express/Boat Torque Cruises, attended the presentation and has unanswered questions regarding the impact the development will have on ferry operations from C Shed.

Mr Hanstead’s main issues include parking demands and the likely disruption caused to the business during the construction phase.

“Our company has been operating out of C Shed for 12 years and for most of that time we have been aware of the impending redevelopment of the wharf,” he said. “A majority of our customers require car parking for the day, and with a construction phase expected to last for two years and taking into consideration current parking demand, we are concerned there will not be adequate parking available during this time.”

Mr Hanstead said he believed the company’s operations, including a ticket office, check-in facilities, gangways, storage needs and occupa-tional health and safety procedures, would be largely affected.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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