29/03/2005 - 22:00

Outcome goal drives size choice

29/03/2005 - 22:00

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One of the first, and most obvious, choices to make when choosing an employer is whether to work for a large or small organisation. Both have advantages and disadvantages, and provide a different range of experiences.

One of the first, and most obvious, choices to make when choosing an employer is whether to work for a large or small organisation. Both have advantages and disadvantages, and provide a different range of experiences.

Those who attended the WA Business News lunch had divergent opinions on which they preferred.

GHD consulting engineer Michael Coombes said that, for an engineer, on-the-job training was needed in order to know how to do the job properly, and with this in mind he initially sought to find employment  with a smaller company.

“Straight out of uni I looked for a small company where I could work directly with experienced people, and got a job like that,” Mr Coombes said.

“After four years I still looked for a similar job because I felt that I still didn’t have the skills that I wanted. But then after a while you start to think you don’t need so much nurturing, so I started looking at bigger companies with more opportunities that are directly visible.

“I came from a small company where it was the directors who owned it, and then the staff, and so it would seem there was a waiting period of years rather than skill to move beyond just being that staff member.

“In a bigger company there is much more structure to it and you can see the obvious pathway.”

SmartSoftware operations manager Donna Griffith said she worked at the one small software company for seven years, but did not feel like she was missing out.

“I have a very wide exposure to new products and clients both interstate and overseas, so I don’t feel like I’m being kept in the dark about what is out there,” she told those at the luncheon.

“I’m still there seven years later, which is quite a long time for my generation, and I enjoy it and have a very wide exposure to things, so I don’t feel that I have to move around or to the next place.”

Taking the opposite point of view was Maunsell engineer Braden Walton, who said he left university and immediately sought employment with a large firm because of the opportunities a large firm could offer.

“The company I work for has 2,500 staff in South-East Asia, in half a dozen different offices, so the variety of work that can be done in that one firm is almost limitless,” Mr Walton said.

“I looked at that and thought that it is always easier to move around within a firm, and from my point of view, it’s just a matter of opportunities and experience.

“If I can get that working with the one company, that’s great, and my standing with the company improves as I move on.

“But if I can’t get that, then I’m more than happy to go elsewhere because it’s the opportunity and experience that attracts me.”

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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