20/03/2007 - 22:00

'New urbanism' a winner

20/03/2007 - 22:00

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One of Western Australia’s oldest but lowest profile property development companies stepped out of the shadows last week to accept a prestigious national award for its Harbour Rise Estate at Hillarys.

'New urbanism' a winner

One of Western Australia’s oldest but lowest profile property development companies stepped out of the shadows last week to accept a prestigious national award for its Harbour Rise Estate at Hillarys.

The Estate Development Company, wholly owned and run by the Roche family, started in WA in 1928 and has developed large parcels of Sorrento, Hillarys, Duncraig and Padbury over the years, creating more than 20,000 lots.

The Roche family has also been busy in South Australia, establishing the Adelaide Development Company in 1922, which is still active across large master planned communities such as Blackwood Park and Encounter Lakes.

The award for Harbour Rise, the Urban Development Institute of Australia’s national residential development award for excellence, is recognition for a development that has been the company’s most successful project to date.

EDC previously won a national UDIA award in 2001 as a joint venture developer on Ascot Waters estate.

General manager Michael Glendinning said the company was proud of what it had achieved at Harbour Rise, a contemporary harbour village based on the planning principles of new urbanism.

He said Harbour Rise was one of the first subdivision development concepts submitted for consideration under criteria of the ‘liveable neighbour-hoods community design code’.

“Our built form design guidelines have been strict from the beginning and have got even tighter with each successive stage," Mr Glendinning said.

‘‘We have guidelines on elements such as roof pitch and ensure that homeowners keep to using light colours and suitable materials for the WA climate.’’

“The ‘classic coastal’ architectural theme is all about being sympathetic to the landscape. We try to discourage people from going for the mock-Tuscan look.”

EDC bought the land at what is now Hillarys and Sorrento in 1948 and has been developing it in stages since then, leaving the 45ha Harbour Rise until last.

Planning of the 500-lot estate began in 1997, with the first lots settled in March 1999. Nineteen separate land releases have been launched to date.

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