11/07/2017 - 06:47

Morning Headlines

11/07/2017 - 06:47

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Surprise visa rule change hits CEOs

Hundreds of foreign executives and senior managers have been retrospectively excluded from permanent residency in Australia as a result of the Turnbull government’s latest changes to skilled visas. The Fin

 

Harrison accused of revenge campaigns

Seven Network has accused former executive Amber Harrison of running so-called ‘‘revenge campaigns’’ against a Nova radio executive with whom she had a relationship, as the company is seeking a full legal cost order and a declaration she acted in breach of the agreement she signed with Seven. The Fin

 

Police go rogue

WA police officers have upped the ante in their push for a better pay deal, launching a fresh wave of industrial action designed to hit the State Government where it hurts most — the hip pocket. The West

 

Battery sector fights fire-risk rules

The fast-growing solar battery storage industry is engaged in a furious 11th-hour battle to kill new regulations that would force homeowners to build a separate “fire bunker” housing for battery installations. The Aus

 

Miner may cut iron ore guidance: UBS

Rio Tinto may be forced to cut its iron ore production target next week, after another month of weak exports from Western Australia. The Fin

Party over as Matisse left high and dry

Matisse, the beach club which tried to add some glamour to Scarborough, has gone under. The West

 

GLAM puts its hat in the CPC ring

Chinese Investment firm Genius Link Asset Management Group, which unsuccessfully bid more than $350 million for the S. Kidman & Co cattle empire, says it would be interested in bidding for all or part of the Consolidated Pastoral Company as it looks to build more farmgate investments in Australia. The Aus

 

Rich pickings with Telstra, Vocus doing deals

Deal-makers in the telecoms space could be in for a lucrative few months as Telstra’s NBN payments come under scrutiny and some are betting that the most likely outcome for Vocus in the coming months will be a break-up. The Aus

 

Union man accused of threatening workers

The construction union and its organiser Brad Upton faced Federal Court yesterday over allegations he threatened nonunion members with standover tactics during a foul-mouthed tirade at the Gorgon project. The West

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Hundreds of foreign executives and senior managers have been retrospectively excluded from permanent residency in Australia as a result of the Turnbull government’s latest changes to skilled visas.

Page 3: Seven Network has accused former executive Amber Harrison of running so-called ‘‘revenge campaigns’’ against a Nova radio executive with whom she had a relationship, as the company is seeking a full legal cost order and a declaration she acted in breach of the agreement she signed with Seven.

Page 5: The Australian Taxation Office has tweaked its view about whether companies linked to family trusts are eligible for tax relief, but industry veterans say the situation remains ‘‘utterly confused’’ and ‘‘mindboggling’’.

Page 6: Wind and solar projects remain competitively priced even after they are required to have battery storage to comply with tough new standards recommended in the Finkel Review, according to a new report.

Page 11: The chairman of Brickworks and Washington H. Soul Pattinson, Robert Millner, says his family’s name has been ‘tarnished’ by Perpetual’s longrunning attempt to argue the cross shareholding between the two companies is oppressive to minority shareholders, which was brutally rejected by the Federal Court.

The competition watchdog is concerned the Australian Competition Tribunal’s approval of an $11 billion merger between Tabcorp and Tatts Group could radically change competition hurdles for future deals.

Page 13: Woolworths’ plans to pay down debt, refurbish supermarkets and expand its convenience store network will hinge on a decision this week by the competition watchdog on the $1.8 billion sale of Woolworths fuel stations to BP.

Page 14: Rio Tinto may be forced to cut its iron ore production target next week, after another month of weak exports from Western Australia.

 

The Australian

Page 1: Malcolm Turnbull has made the bold claim that the Liberal Party has never been a conservative party, and that Robert Menzies was a moderate, progressive leader, in a speech strongly defending his own centrist governing style.

Page 3: Amber Harrison, the former mistress of Seven West Media boss Tim Worner, claimed she wanted to “kill him” before launching a “malicious and vindictive” media revenge campaign that included as many as 135 phone calls to journalists, the NSW Supreme Court heard yesterday.

Page 6: The fast-growing solar battery storage industry is engaged in a furious 11th-hour battle to kill new regulations that would force homeowners to build a separate “fire bunker” housing for battery installations.

The Queensland government has defended its electricity policies against claims of state-sanctioned profiteering as pressure mounts on regulators to overhaul the system.

Page 17: Competition tsar Rod Sims says he had “no choice” but to appeal against a tribunal ruling allowing the $11 billion merger of gambling giants Tabcorp and Tatts to go ahead because the decision had shattered his existing notions of how he should apply the law.

Chinese Investment firm Genius Link Asset Management Group, which unsuccessfully bid more than $350 million for the S. Kidman & Co cattle empire, says it would be interested in bidding for all or part of the Consolidated Pastoral Company as it looks to build more farmgate investments in Australia.

Page 18: Deal-makers in the telecoms space could be in for a lucrative few months as Telstra’s NBN payments come under scrutiny and some are betting that the most likely outcome for Vocus in the coming months will be a break-up.

 

The West Australian

Page 1: WA police officers have upped the ante in their push for a better pay deal, launching a fresh wave of industrial action designed to hit the State Government where it hurts most — the hip pocket.

Page 3: The number of West Australians waiting for government-funded elective surgery has surged past 20,000 for the first time.

Page 6: Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull spent last night in London with his British counterpart Theresa May, with the pair visiting the site of the Borough Market terror attack.

Page 7: The construction union and its organiser Brad Upton faced Federal Court yesterday over allegations he threatened nonunion members with standover tactics during a foul-mouthed tirade at the Gorgon project.

Page 11: Mining billionaire Angela Bennett, lawyers for her deceased brother Michael Wright and the warring family’s “black sheep” brother Julian have been told to try to mediate what could become one of Australia’s biggest common-law fraud cases.

Page 12: The State Government is today expected to announce plans for its first medi-hotel in Murdoch.

Page 40: Poseidon Nickel has taken another step in its bid to secure revenue streams outside of the downtrodden nickel sector, yesterday striking an agreement with Aphrodite Gold to process ore at its mothballed Black Swan processing plant 50km north of Kalgoorlie.

Matisse, the beach club which tried to add some glamour to Scarborough, has gone under.

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