03/05/2017 - 06:37

Morning Headlines

03/05/2017 - 06:37

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Morning Headlines

PM steals Gonski away from Labor

The Turnbull government will pour almost $19 billion extra into school funding over the next decade and embrace David Gonski’s needs-based funding model in a major policy backflip that seeks to neutralise one of Labor’s key political strengths. The Fin

 

Crossbench open to lifting student fees, repayments

The majority of the Senate crossbench is prepared to consider the government’s university fees policy, giving the government a glimmer of hope that four years of policy inertia may come to an end. The Fin

 

Murray Goulburn rejig puts farmers before shareholders

The new chief executive of embattled Murray Goulburn says the rebuild of trust and confidence in Australia’s biggest milk processor will take a long time but a sweeping restructuring is a vital first step. The Fin

 

Get up to speed, watchdog tells NBN

The national consumer watchdog has said the National Broadband Network must provide details of all known internet speed problems affecting every home nationwide, in a bid to prevent retailers from gouging consumers by selling fast connections which don’t exist. The Aus

 

Lifting restriction on fracking will fix gas crisis: Boral chief

Boral chief executive Mike Kane has declared Australia needs to allow fracking to increase gas supply and help fix the nation’s energy crisis. The Aus

 

Mac, Brookfield moving on $3bn Quadrant float

Private equity firm Brookfield and Macquarie Group are expected to begin moving forward on what is shaping up to be the largest initial public offering this year, with fresh suggestions that Quadrant Energy may tap the market for as much as $3 billion. The Aus

 

WA gets $1.7b for schools

WA schools are the biggest winners and will get a $1.7 billion windfall after Malcolm Turnbull’s surprise U-turn on education funding. The West

  

Dexus plots $30m overhaul

Perth’s second-biggest office landlord Dexus has withdrawn Woodside Plaza from sale, declaring it will get better value from overhauling the ground floor and lobby and installing a new childcare centre. The West

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The Turnbull government will pour almost $19 billion extra into school funding over the next decade and embrace David Gonski’s needs-based funding model in a major policy backflip that seeks to neutralise one of Labor’s key political strengths.

Page 3: Unions and super funds have warned that a government-appointed panel to pick which funds will be eligible for employees who don’t choose their own scheme is at risk of being biased.

Page 5: The majority of the Senate crossbench is prepared to consider the government’s university fees policy, giving the government a glimmer of hope that four years of policy inertia may come to an end.

Page 8: Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews’ $2 billion-plus sale of the state’s land titles office, a jobs and population boom and a strong but moderating property market will help to keep the state in surplus even after a big spending budget ahead of next year’s state election.

Page 9: The Turnbull government’s restrictions of chief executives to two-year visas are breaching the country’s obligations to the World Trade Organisation and could damage its credibility in the international arena, according to trade experts.

Page 13: The new chief executive of embattled Murray Goulburn says the rebuild of trust and confidence in Australia’s biggest milk processor will take a long time but a sweeping restructuring is a vital first step.

 

The Australian

Page 1: Malcolm Turnbull risks a revolt in the Coalition’s base after ditching the political tenet that no school would be worse off under education funding changes and embarking on a gamble to introduce “genuine’’ needs-based resourcing.

Page 2: Westpac has come under fresh scrutiny over its ban on funding new coal projects in Queensland’s Galilee basin, amid claims the veto is designed to protect its financial link with the Port of Newcastle.

Page 3: The national consumer watchdog has said the National Broadband Network must provide details of all known internet speed problems affecting every home nationwide, in a bid to prevent retailers from gouging consumers by selling fast connections which don’t exist.

Page 4: The government will be forced to negotiate with Senate crossbenchers on key elements of its revamped higher education package, as Bill Shorten ramps up his attack on the Coalition and declares Labor is “very opposed” to university funding cuts.

Page 5: Private investors are backing the Turnbull government’s $10 billion inland rail network by planning to build new projects along the freight route, with transport company Linfox and Queensland airport operator Wagners endorsing the plan.

Page 19: Boral chief executive Mike Kane has declared Australia needs to allow fracking to increase gas supply and help fix the nation’s energy crisis.

Page 20: Private equity firm Brookfield and Macquarie Group are expected to begin moving forward on what is shaping up to be the largest initial public offering this year, with fresh suggestions that Quadrant Energy may tap the market for as much as $3 billion.

 

The West Australian

Page 1: WA schools are the biggest winners and will get a $1.7 billion windfall after Malcolm Turnbull’s surprise U-turn on education funding.

The corruption watchdog has called for the State Government to take action as it cited evidence of rising levels of mismanagement and fraud among local councils.

Page 5: WA university leaders have warned that changes to course fees could prevent some students getting a tertiary education.

Page 11: Australians in pain from chronic ailments will get access to medicinal cannabis from today as the first major commercial shipments of the drug clear Customs.

Page 12: Planning Minister Rita Saffioti has ridiculed the previous government’s claims that Elizabeth Quay has attracted more than seven million visitors since it opened in January last year.

Page 16: Opposition Leader Mike Nahan has compared Mark McGowan to Vladimir Putin after the Premier called on the Liberals and Nationals not to block priority law-and-order legislation.

Page 29: Terrex Group owner Steve Tobin says game-changing seismic technology is behind the deal to sell a majority stake in the resources contractor to a private equity firm.

Page 72: Perth’s second-biggest office landlord Dexus has withdrawn Woodside Plaza from sale, declaring it will get better value from overhauling the ground floor and lobby and installing a new childcare centre.

Stirling Capital has won a twoyear extension for its third Stirling Street project — a $55 million, 34-level apartment tower — citing last year’s downturn.

Page 73: Hong Kong-listed Far East Consortium has declared its five-lot Perth City Link development extravaganza an opportunity to help Perth become a “truly international city”.

Franchisor Wyndham Hotel Group and VetroBlu Management are capitalising on the $100 million beachfront overhaul at Scarborough to open WA’s fourth Ramada hotel.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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