19/04/2017 - 06:34

Morning Headlines

19/04/2017 - 06:34

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Morning Headlines

Students face higher ed budget cuts

University students could be hit with higher fees and graduates required to pay back their loans faster than at present under a revamped higher education package being considered for the May budget. The Fin

 

Japan brings TPP back from the dead

A surprising about-face by Japan has resurrected the Trans Pacific Partnership, a regional free trade deal considered dead after US President Donald Trump withdrew from the agreement following his election. The Fin

 

Axe bonuses for bank staff

Banks will be forced to make wholesale changes to the way staff are rewarded under a series of recommendations that look to scrap payments to retail bank employees that rely on hitting sales targets. The Fin

 

457 axing will leave talent gap: start-ups

Australia’s technology start-up community is up in arms over the Turnbull government’s decision to can the 457 visa program, warning of an acute staffing shortage across the sector. The Aus

 

How the big banks massaged the message for corporate watchdog

Over nearly a decade, the corporate regulator regularly bowed to demands from big banks and financial players — NAB, CBA, Westpac, Macquarie and AMP — to water down the language used in press releases dealing with industry wrongdoing. The Aus

 

KKR in fresh $7.3bn Tatts bid

Private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and backers have offered a fresh $7.3 billion bid for Tatts Group to rival Tabcorp’s merger offer. The Aus

 

East-west gas pipe plan gets backing

The Turnbull Government is considering a “nation-building” plan to back constructing a gas pipeline from WA to the east as part of a multibillion-dollar push to address the national energy crisis. The West

 

Minister wants new take on State housing

Public housing eligibility needs to be defined by more than just an income limit, Housing Minister Peter Tinley believes. The West

 

Atlas shrugs at ore price fall

The falling iron ore price poses no risk to Atlas Iron’s new Corunna Downs project in the short term, according to Atlas boss Cliff Lawrenson. The West

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The Turnbull government’s crackdown on the use of foreign workers is part of a broader set of measures designed to tighten immigration law and improve ‘‘social cohesion’’, which could include issuing P-plates to budding migrants.

University students could be hit with higher fees and graduates required to pay back their loans faster than at present under a revamped higher education package being considered for the May budget.

Page 2: Three per cent of Australians, or 399,000 people, contribute 30 per cent of income tax, according to new figures.

Page 6: Despairing manufacturers struggling with soaring gas prices hold low hopes of a remedy emerging from Wednesday’s meeting of gas company chief executives in Canberra, despite some tough words from Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Page 7: Liberal Party powerbrokers warn Tony Abbott could face a preselection challenge for his seat of Warringah ahead of next year’s federal election, especially if he continues to destabilise the Turnbull government.

Page 9: A surprising about-face by Japan has resurrected the Trans Pacific Partnership, a regional free trade deal considered dead after US President Donald Trump withdrew from the agreement following his election.

Page 13: Banks will be forced to make wholesale changes to the way staff are rewarded under a series of recommendations that look to scrap payments to retail bank employees that rely on hitting sales targets.

Financial markets have shown a willingness to buy the dip whenever geopolitical risks are elevated and the situation on the Korean Peninsula is possibly no different. But the biggest reason why investors are not panicking about events in North Korea, Turkey or France right now is that growth is good.

Page 15: Coles and Woolworths are getting discounts of almost 4 per cent of sales from small food and grocery suppliers in return for the privilege of paying them for goods in 30 days rather than 60 days.

 

The Australian

Page 1: Companies applying to bring in foreign workers will be forced to pay into a national fund to train Australian workers to fill skills shortages, following Malcolm Turnbull’s decision to abolish the controversial 457 visa scheme.

A leap in economic growth will send Australia’s jobless rate plunging over the next two years, according to the International Monetary Fund’s latest projections, which herald a recovery of the world’s economy almost a decade after the global financial crisis.

Page 2: Resources Minister Matt Canavan has declared gas swap contracts aimed at increasing domestic supplies should be left to the private sector, as he repeats calls for state governments to free up resources to help prevent a looming energy crisis.

Page 4: Australia’s technology start-up community is up in arms over the Turnbull government’s decision to can the 457 visa program, warning of an acute staffing shortage across the sector.

Page 6: The South Australian Energy Minister was told by his top bureaucrat on the morning of last September’s statewide blackout that there was “an outage” on the interconnector with Victoria which “does not cause a separation risk”, internal government documents reveal.

Page 17: Over nearly a decade, the corporate regulator regularly bowed to demands from big banks and financial players — NAB, CBA, Westpac, Macquarie and AMP — to water down the language used in press releases dealing with industry wrongdoing.

Private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and backers have offered a fresh $7.3 billion bid for Tatts Group to rival Tabcorp’s merger offer.

Page 19: Rail freight operator Aurizon endured a rollercoaster day of trade yesterday as investors weighed a sharp guidance cut against a quicker than expected return to operation for a crucial coal system.

 

The West Australian

Page 4: The new State Government will do nothing about the shark that killed a teenage girl in Esperance, ditching a policy that allowed great white sharks to be captured.

Page 9: Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has declared his commitment to putting Australian jobs and values first by making it harder to hire foreign workers as the Federal Government scrambles to recover ground lost to Labor and One Nation.

Page 13: The Turnbull Government is considering a “nation-building” plan to back constructing a gas pipeline from WA to the east as part of a multibillion-dollar push to address the national energy crisis.

Page 18: Public housing eligibility needs to be defined by more than just an income limit, Housing Minister Peter Tinley believes.

Page 20: WA’s new Defence Issues Minister Paul Papalia wants the Commonwealth to commit to building all future navy vessels in Australia.

Page 27: The falling iron ore price poses no risk to Atlas Iron’s new Corunna Downs project in the short term, according to Atlas boss Cliff Lawrenson.

If the Federal Government wants to solve the east coast energy crisis with WA gas, then Canberra will need to cross half a continent and solve a world of problems.

Page 69: Investors have turned on TPG Telecom, stripping almost $1 billion from its market value after the group last week unveiled plans to build Australia’s fourth mobile network.

Page 70: Finbar expects to start selling its Applecross high-rise apartments this year after Melville councillors threw their support behind the $138 million development.

Bunnings is poised to build a new store in Jolimont after spending $13 million on a 9984sqm parcel of land on Hay Street.

Page 71: Stamp duty reform and urban infill are top priorities for new Property Council WA president Tanya Trevisan.

Page 73: Commercial builder EMCO Building’s new chief executive Ron Keogh plans to build on the company’s growth.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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