13/03/2017 - 06:36

Morning Headlines

13/03/2017 - 06:36

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Morning Headlines

Coalition split over Hanson deals

Malcolm Turnbull has put himself on a collision course with elements of his party by refusing to rule out preference deals with One Nation, despite the rout of the West Australian Liberals at Saturday’s state election. The Fin

 

Day one: kill Barnett agenda off

Incoming West Australian premier Mark McGowan will oppose a state-based renewable energy target, kill off a push for a mining tax, and tear up contracts for the $1.9 billion Perth Freight Link. The Fin

 

Nationals leader Grylls’ seat still on a knife-edge

The National party has managed to hold its ground across Western Australia in the face of an enormous swing to Labor but the party’s signature mining tax policy is dead and its leader Brendon Grylls yet to secure his Pilbara seat. The Fin

 

ALP taps winning formula at poll time

The message from the West Australian political bloodbath is that Labor has proved, yet again, it controls the winning formula — superior voter engagement, a disciplined, researched campaign with a “safe pair of hands” leader, the populist pitch and repudiation of tough economic reform — all backed by deep trade union pockets. The Aus

 

State bogged down by rising debt

The most pressing problem for Labor’s likely treasurer Ben Wyatt will be developing a strategy for reducing the state’s debt burden, which the state Treasury predicts will climb from $33.2 billion this year to reach $41.1bn by 2020. The Aus

 

Premier must deal with MPs’ union ties

Former trade union officials and MPs with close ties to powerful unions will be a force in the new West Australian cabinet, but premier-elect Mark McGowan is also under pressure to give a senior portfolio to longtime union antagonist Alannah MacTiernan. The Aus

 

Barminco’s now a golden chance

Investment bank UBS is believed to have landed a mandate to float mining contractor Barminco this year, with some suggesting the previously troubled group could be sold for about $400 million. The Aus

 

Unions take credit for win

The head of one of WA’s most militant unions says Labor leader Mark McGowan owes trade unions for his victory on Saturday. The West

 

Harvey faces rival as Libs look to axe hacks

Shell-shocked Liberals are looking to Liza Harvey as leader of a decimated Opposition, with Churchlands MP Sean L’Estrange also seen as a possible contender. The West

 

Barnett ‘has to own train wreck’

Some of the State’s leading business people have launched an extraordinary attack on Colin Barnett, claiming he has to “own the train wreck” of the Liberals’ landslide loss. The West

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Tesla chief executive Elon Musk and Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull discussed battery storage solutions to the nation’s power woes, as a bidding war erupted over who is to build the battery farms to save South Australia’s wobbly grid.

Malcolm Turnbull has put himself on a collision course with elements of his party by refusing to rule out preference deals with One Nation, despite the rout of the West Australian Liberals at Saturday’s state election.

Incoming West Australian premier Mark McGowan will oppose a state-based renewable energy target, kill off a push for a mining tax, and tear up contracts for the $1.9 billion Perth Freight Link.

Page 3: The federal Treasury has effectively confirmed it has been modelling reductions in the capital gains tax concession for investors, as the government continues to debate internally whether to adopt any change in the budget.

Page 6: The National party has managed to hold its ground across Western Australia in the face of an enormous swing to Labor but the party’s signature mining tax policy is dead and its leader Brendon Grylls yet to secure his Pilbara seat.

Page 13: Critics not over the moon for Spaceship A start-up super fund aggressively targeting millennials via social media has alarmed investment advisers who say it is more expensive than most super funds and is taking significant risk without promising higher returns.

Page 15: Margaret Hall has her hands on what is a scarce and highly prized resource: some rapidly available gas in today’s tight east coast market.

More mining and exploration companies could list on the ASX in the first quarter of 2017 than in the whole of 2016 as commodity price stability encourages investors to revisit more speculative stocks.

 

The Australian

Page 1: Recriminations over the West Australian Liberal Party’s One Nation preference deal, which contributed to the Barnett government’s historic election defeat, are threatening to spill over into Malcolm Turnbull’s partyroom, as the Prime Minister refuses to rule out a similar deal for the next federal election.

The message from the West Australian political bloodbath is that Labor has proved, yet again, it controls the winning formula — superior voter engagement, a disciplined, researched campaign with a “safe pair of hands” leader, the populist pitch and repudiation of tough economic reform — all backed by deep trade union pockets.

It was one of the nation’s great roads that delivered Mark McGowan across the Nullarbor Plain to Western Australia 26 years ago.

Page 2: Malcolm Turnbull’s government stands ready to fund and support serious proposals for new energy storage projects which have been “long neglected” in Australia’s electricity system, after an hourlong phone call yesterday to US clean energy multi-billionaire Elon Musk.

Page 4: The most pressing problem for Labor’s likely treasurer Ben Wyatt will be developing a strategy for reducing the state’s debt burden, which the state Treasury predicts will climb from $33.2 billion this year to reach $41.1bn by 2020.

Page 5: Former trade union officials and MPs with close ties to powerful unions will be a force in the new West Australian cabinet, but premier-elect Mark McGowan is also under pressure to give a senior portfolio to longtime union antagonist Alannah MacTiernan.

The biggest swing to Labor in Saturday’s election was in the regional city of Bunbury, where the Barnett government had invested heavily, shifting agencies to the satellite city to create jobs.

Page 7: On the day his nephew Clive Mensink apparently stepped off a luxury cruise ship with his new girlfriend on his arm, Clive Palmer was removing him from senior roles in 67 companies in his empire.

Page 17: BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto have emerged as the biggest corporate winners from Labor’s election victory in Western Australia, with the landslide win killing off any hopes for the iron ore tax that would have cost the pair about $3 billion a year.

Page 18: Investment bank UBS is believed to have landed a mandate to float mining contractor Barminco this year, with some suggesting the previously troubled group could be sold for about $400 million.

 

The West Australian

Page 2: Incoming premier Mark McGowan has signalled to contractors on the Roe 8 highway extension that turning up to work this morning is futile.

The head of one of WA’s most militant unions says Labor leader Mark McGowan owes trade unions for his victory on Saturday.

Page 4: Shell-shocked Liberals are looking to Liza Harvey as leader of a decimated Opposition, with Churchlands MP Sean L’Estrange also seen as a possible contender.

Page 5: Some of the State’s leading business people have launched an extraordinary attack on Colin Barnett, claiming he has to “own the train wreck” of the Liberals’ landslide loss.

Page 6: Liberal leadership hopeful Joe Francis’ parliamentary future remained in the balance last night as a newly elected Labor MP accused the defeated Barnett Government of an “act of bastardry” in Perth’s south.

The Liberal Party’s proposed Western Power sale created the centrepiece for an electoral wipeout in the East Metropolitan Region, according to fallen minister John Day and new Kalamunda MP, Labor’s Matthew Hughes.

Page 7: The curse of Pauline Hanson, particularly among elderly voters, ruined the Liberal Party’s chances in the South West, according to returned Collie-Preston MP Mick Murray.

Page 9: Malcolm Turnbull has refused to rule out a preference deal with One Nation as recriminations grow within the Liberal Party about the WA election result.

One Nation chiefs remain optimistic of winning three Upper House seats despite support crashing for Pauline Hanson’s party after a shocking last week of the campaign.

Page 10: Mark McGowan didn’t just scale Everest, he jumped right over the top of it. Having used the mountaineering analogy to describe the task of winning 10 seats to take government, he has conquered at least 18, maybe more.

Page 12: Labor’s emphatic election victory will put it in a strong position in the Upper House, with predictions the party could win as many as 15 seats in the Legislative Council.

Business associations yesterday paid tribute to outgoing Premier Colin Barnett’s achievements, claiming he stood out for his work in resources and city infrastructure.

Page 11: As Nationals leader Brendon Grylls waits to find out his political fate, he will be comforted by the Theodore Roosevelt quote by which he lives his life.

Page 19: Mystery still surrounds why a car crashed into the water at Bunbury port early on Saturday morning, killing a young woman trapped inside.

Page 51: Rock kickers laid off in WA’s mining downturn are yet to see the benefits of last year’s price recovery in gold and iron ore, according to the Australian Institute of Geoscientists.

After years of blaming Colin Barnett for WA’s recent economic malaise, Mark McGowan is about to learn how impotent he is to effect change.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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