03/02/2017 - 06:40

Morning Headlines

03/02/2017 - 06:40

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Morning Headlines

Trump tries to rough up PM

The Australian-US relationship is facing its most severe test in decades following revelations of a heated clash between Malcolm Turnbull and Donald Trump over the refugee swap deal and ongoing mixed signals from Washington as to whether the deal will actually be honoured. The Fin

Trade surplus quells doomsday talks

The biggest surge in coal and iron ore prices in almost seven years has delivered Australia its largest trade surplus on record, soothing fears of a technical recession, pushing up the dollar and lifting the chances of an official interest rate hike this year. The Fin

Seven probe set to clear Worner as director quits

Embattled Seven West Media boss Tim Worner is expected to avoid accusations of wrongdoing in his affair with a former employee when the TV broadcaster releases the findings of an independent investigation into the sex scandal. The Aus

States, territories cut school funding by $100m

Four of the states and territories have ripped more than $100 million out of the cost of educating their own students, relying on federal funding under the Gonski deal to prop up spending. The Aus

BHP, Rio go on mine tax attack

Western Australia's Liberal National government is in an election campaign brawl with miners over a proposed multi-billion-dollar royalties increase as Premier Colin Barnett seeks a third term. The Aus

Traffickers to get life under Labor

Methamphetamine traffickers will face a maximum penalty of life in jail if Labor wins next month's state election in a move that would give WA the harshest drug laws in the nation. The West

Libs will back mine tax: Grylls

Nationals WA leader Brendon Grylls yesterday predicted the Liberals would wilt and accept his mining tax to retain government, as he revealed a $610 million package of regional tourism promises funded by the divisive pledge. The West

Nickel back on Manila thriller

The wild ride for WA nickel producers looks set to continue after the Philippines shut more than 20 mines and suspended others as part of an environmental crackdown. The West

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The Australian-US relationship is facing its most severe test in decades following revelations of a heated clash between Malcolm Turnbull and Donald Trump over the refugee swap deal and ongoing mixed signals from Washington as to whether the deal will actually be honoured.

The biggest surge in coal and iron ore prices in almost seven years has delivered Australia its largest trade surplus on record, soothing fears of a technical recession, pushing up the dollar and lifting the chances of an official interest rate hike this year.

Page 2: Seven West Media non-executive director Shelia McGregor has resigned from the board at a time when the free-to-air broadcaster is dealing with the fallout from an affair between chief executive Tim Worner and a former company executive assistant.

Page 3: Medical cannabis producer AusCann is set to become the latest player to join the $250 billion 'pot stock' boom when it begins trading on the ASX on Friday, as federal and state governments relax the law and investors cash in.

Page 5: Donald Trump's reported blasting of Malcolm Turnbull underlines how Australia and the world needs to quickly adjust to grave international uncertainty under the new President, former senior Obama and Bush administration officials say.

Page 7: Malcolm Turnbull is prepared to discuss establishing a domestic gas reserve as part of his new energy security push but his plans for clean coal power stations have suffered a blow, with the industry saying there was no appetite to invest in such plans.

Page 9: The power industry said Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull was barking up the wrong tree with his 'clean coal' push as multiple obstacles emerged to the use of clean energy agencies to fund new high-efficiency coal plants.

Page 10: Malcolm Turnbull's senior colleagues have turned on the political donations of the union movement and Labor's own 'levies' on its parliamentarians' salaries to deflect opposition attacks on the Prime Minister's personal $1.75 million donation to the Liberal Party.

Page 11: The Turnbull government will introduce changes to workplace laws in the next two months as part of a push to remove 'overly technical' bargaining requirements that are seeking non-union enterprise agreements killed off in the Fair Work Commission.

Page 17: Tabcorp chief executive David Attenborough insists the gaming giant is not overpaying for rival Tatts Group, despite the latter revealing the half-year profits for its lotteries division will be hit by a lower number of big jackpots.

The Australian

Page 1: Australia's alliance with the US has hit its lowest point in decades, in a clash over a divisive refugee deal that led Donald Trump to berate Malcolm Turnbull in private before staging a public retreat from the agreement.

Embattled Seven West Media boss Tim Worner is expected to avoid accusations of wrongdoing in his affair with a former employee when the TV broadcaster releases the findings of an independent investigation into the sex scandal.

Page 2: Malcolm Turnbull says it is 'very likely' that he will make more donations to the Liberals as he fends off criticism from Labor that giving the party a record $1.75 million 'bought himself an election'.

Page 3: Four of the states and territories have ripped more than $100 million out of the cost of educating their own students, relying on federal funding under the Gonski deal to prop up spending.

Page 5: Western Australia's Liberal National government is in an election campaign brawl with miners over a proposed multi-billion-dollar royalties increase as Premier Colin Barnett seeks a third term.

Page 7: The Turnbull government will spend $40 million evaluating its indigenous affairs programs in an attempt to counter a national audit office report expected to be harshly critical of the way billions of dollars have been allocated.

Page 19: The nation's mining industry has entered a new boom after delivering a record set of monthly exports, positioning the sector for a resurgent profit season.

Page 20: Competition regulator Rod Sims is heading into 2017 with a solid pipeline of corporate deals ready to run his ruler over and bankers expect him to maintain his tough approach.

Page 21: Two of Australia's best known fashion brands, David Lawrence and Marcs, are the latest retailers to find themselves up for sale after landing in financial strife.

The West Australian

Page 3: Methamphetamine traffickers will face a maximum penalty of life in jail if Labor wins next month's state election in a move that would give WA the harshest drug laws in the nation.

Page 4: Malcolm Turnbull's special deal to spend 1,250 refugees to the US appears in doubt amid fears the government's relationship with Donald Trump could be irreparably damaged.

Page 10: A group of high-profile academics, including former premier Carmen Lawrence, have joined forces to protest against Roe 8.

Bill Shorten says Mark McGowan would be entitled to redirect $1.2 billion in Federal funds from the Perth Freight Link to other projects should he become premier and cancel the project.

Page 11: Nationals WA leader Brendon Grylls yesterday predicted the Liberals would wilt and accept his mining tax to retain government, as he revealed a $610 million package of regional tourism promises funded by the divisive pledge.

Page 12: A human-like robot designed for space travel that can see, smell and hear is arriving to work at Woodside's Karratha LNG plant in June.

Page 16: Hundreds of native title agreements across Australia have been thrown into doubt by a Federal Court ruling handed down in Perth yesterday.

Page 55: The wild ride for WA nickel producers looks set to continue after the Philippines shut more than 20 mines and suspended others as part of an environmental crackdown.

Page 56: WA's Information Commissioner has blasted the Department of State Development for refusing a freedom of information request on 'untrue' and 'potentially misleading' grounds.

Downer EDI has lifted a half-year profit by 8.5 per cent as it shifts to rail, transport services and technology sectors helped offset the continuing decline in its core mining services business.

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