12/01/2017 - 06:09

Morning Headlines

12/01/2017 - 06:09

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Morning Headlines

One Nation learning from mistakes as Culleton goes

New Western Australian One Nation leader Colin Tincknell has conceded his party may have selected candidates too early for the Queensland election after they were forced to disendorse two individuals - one within days of being selected. The Fin

 

BHP chiefs in talks with Trump

BHP Billiton chief executive Andrew Mackenzie and chairman Jac Nasser have met with Donald Trump in New York as concerns grow over the President-elect’s plan to impose trade tariffs on China. The Fin

 

Shorten family election travel bill triple PM’s

Taxpayers paid more for Bill Shorten’s family to travel with him in the lead-up to last year’s election than they spent on the family travel of Malcolm Turnbull and Tony Abbott in the last three elections combined. The Aus

 

Ralph slams iron ore tax hike

Western Australia was warned yesterday that it faces deep and lasting consequences should the state arbitrarily increase the taxes it charges to its two iron ore giants. The Aus

 

‘Ineffective’ Grylls on Hanson’s hit list

Pauline Hanson’s One Nation appears set to direct preferences against Brendon Grylls in his electorate of Pilbara, a development that could make it more difficult for him to hold his seat. The West

 

Schools’ $8.5m strategy to help pupils cope

Schools should be assessed on how well they help their pupils cope with life’s pressures, as well as on academic and sport achievements, according to the head of an elite girls’ school. The West

 

Bullish experts eye magic 6,000

Better employment figures, Chinese growth and strong gains by the country’s resource giants led the market to continue its 2017 bull run, with some economists predicting it could go beyond 6,000 points this year. The West

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The head of oil giant Shell’s Australian multibillion dollar operations has laid bare the blame for the east coast gas squeeze squarely with the Victorian government, declaring that rising prices caused by the state’s ban on onshore gas will take a direct toll on jobs.

Bellamy’s Australia says it is the latest casualty of trying to do business in China, with difficult conditions forcing the organic baby food and formula maker to remove its chief executive, renegotiate a key supplier contract and halve its profit estimate for the year.

Page 2: New Western Australian One Nation leader Colin Tincknell has conceded his party may have selected candidates too early for the Queensland election after they were forced to disendorse two individuals - one within days of being selected.

Japan’s concerns about increased sovereign risks around oil and gas interests in the Timor Sea are expected to be high on the agenda in meetings set for Saturday between Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Malcolm Turnbull in Sydney.

Page 4: Australian cities recover a fraction of the cost of public transport tickets compared with their international counterparts and governments need to increase fares to make the system sustainable, a new report says.

Page 7: Confidence in the residential and commercial property markets, particularly around rising prices, has hit a two-year high despite a complete reversal in expectations for the future of interest rates.

The big price drops that hit Perth’s ritziest suburbs for the past two years appears to be abating, according to property industry executives who say wealthy income owners are no longer desperate  to offload mansions and are unwilling to accept low ball offers.

Page 8: BHP Billiton chief executive Andrew Mackenzie and chairman Jac Nasser have met with Donald Trump in New York as concerns grow over the President-elect’s plan to impose trade tariffs on China.

 

The Australian

Page 1: Manufacturers are warning of job losses and a collapse in investment across the country as a doubling in gas prices for some businesses adds millions to their energy costs, stoking federal government calls for states to lift restrictions that stymie new gas developments.

Page 2: Bankrupt farmer Rod Culleton has been sent his marching orders after officially being ejected from parliament, but the controversial former One Nation senator is not giving up on his short-lived political career.

Taxpayers paid more for Bill Shorten’s family to travel with him in the lead-up to last year’s election than they spent on the family travel of Malcolm Turnbull and Tony Abbott in the last three elections combined.

Page 4: State and federal governments face fresh pressure to urgently deal with spiralling energy costs as new research suggests the majority of businesses expect to be hit with price rises again this year.

Page 13: Embattled organic infant formula company Bellamy’s is heading for more strife with angry dissident investors declaring war after the dumping of chief executive Laura McBain yesterday following a further profit downgrade and a 20 per cent fall in its shares.

Western Australia was warned yesterday that it faces deep and lasting consequences should the state arbitrarily increase the taxes it charges to its two iron ore giants.

Page 15: Australian Finance Group, the country’s biggest mortgage broker, yesterday revealed a sharp decline  in home loan activity in mining-dependent Western Australia and the Northern Territory, but said a flurry of mortgage refinancing in eastern states would help buoy the economy.

 

The West Australian

Page 1: A defiant one-time One Nation WA senator-cum-independent Rod Culleton will not go quietly from the political stage, vowing to fight his disqualification from Parliament after being declared bankrupt by the Federal Court.

Page 3: A Perth hospital dietitian is blaming sugar phobia for a trend in people avoiding fruit because of concerns they will put on weight.

Page 4: Politicians caught rorting taxpayer-funded entitlements should be fined in a bid to stamp out bad behaviour, Pauline Hanson says.

Page 6: Pauline Hanson’s One Nation appears set to direct preferences against Brendon Grylls in his electorate of Pilbara, a development that could make it more difficult for him to hold his seat.

Page 9: Schools should be assessed on how well they help their pupils cope with life’s pressures, as well as on academic and sport achievements, according to the head of an elite girls’ school.

Page 49: BHP Billiton’s top two executives have met president-elect Donald Trump to discuss the mining giant’s role in the US.

The gold price may be soft than it was in June but Ramelius Resources managing director Mark Zeptner says market prices for local gold projects are still to prohibitive for Australia’s mid-tier.

Page 50: Padbury Mining is back in trouble with the Australian Securities Exchange, admitting it had again failed to meet its disclosure obligations by not immediately announcing it had cut a deal for a $4.8 million capital raising in June.

Global exploration budgets at listed mining companies slumped to a decade-low last year, according to S&P Global Markets Intelligence, as volatile commodity markets cast a pall over risky exploration spending.

Page 51: Better employment figures, Chinese growth and strong gains by the country’s resource giants led the market to continue its 2017 bull run, with some economists predicting it could go beyond 6,000 points this year.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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