02/08/2016 - 06:14

Morning Headlines

02/08/2016 - 06:14

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.
Morning Headlines

Treasurer gives nod to rate cut

Treasurer Scott Morrison has effectively endorsed another Reserve Bank of Australia interest rate cut today to help the nation shake off weak inflation, revive wages growth and spur business investment. The Fin

Fairfax to write down publishing assets by $1b

Fairfax Media’s largest shareholder has backed the company’s move to shift Domain into a new reporting unit to help establish the true value of the highly successful real estate services business. The Fin

Woolies urged to settle supplier claims

Woolworths is under growing pressure to settle an unconscionable conduct case with the competition regulator amid signs that poor relationships with suppliers are stymying its attempts to revive supermarket sales. The Fin

Boards struggle to deal with change

PricewaterhouseCoopers chief executive Luke Sayers says the confidence of boards to govern with authority has been undermined by the rate of change, which has rendered much of their experience irrelevant. The Fin

Labor vows subbie safeguards

WA Labor is making a pitch for blue-collar voters, with a policy that guarantees subcontractors will be paid for work on government projects and aims to tighten protections on private building schemes. The West

Growers warned on CBH value

Australian Grains Champion director Brad Jones has added his $2 worth to the debate over the $2.56 billion value put on grower-controlled CBH. The West

Gays ‘are better qualified for jobs’

Australians identifying as gay, lesbian or bisexual are better qualified and earn more, according to one of the few studies into the economic effects of sexuality, calling into question moves by a leading education foundation to link high school scholarships with sexual orientation. The Aus

Chasing loans puts lenders ‘at risk’

Banks aggressively chasing loans are putting future profitability at risk as margins are crunched by falling official interest rates that are failing to inspire widespread demand from borrowers or inflation, experts say. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Treasurer Scott Morrison has effectively endorsed another Reserve Bank of Australia interest rate cut today to help the nation shake off weak inflation, revive wages growth and spur business investment.

The new chief executive of the ASX, Dominic Stevens, says he will adopt a cautious approach to blockchain technology, prepare the ASX for potential global stock exchange consolidation, and ensure new listing rules lift the market’s quality, adding value to every company listed on it.

Page 6: A long-running battle between former Glencore trader Vaughan Blank and the Australian Tax Office over $200 million in bonuses will reach its climax when the matter is heard by the High Court this month.

Page 8: Strong growth at the Port of Melbourne is expected to help boost the sale price of the asset, which will be privatised within weeks.

Page 11: Fairfax Media’s largest shareholder has backed the company’s move to shift Domain into a new reporting unit to help establish the true value of the highly successful real estate services business.

Magellan’s chief Hamish Douglass is backing the world’s largest technology companies to capture the value and avoid the disruption of the artificial intelligence revolution that he believes will reshape the investing landscape.

Page 14: The Snowy Mountains Engineering Company expects to triple its Australian workforce and compete for more urban infrastructure projects after being acquired by Singaporean consultants Surbana Jurong for $S400 million ($393 million).

Page 16: Buys gaming tech group in $128m deal Tabcorp will acquire ASX-listed gaming technology group INTECQ for $128 million in a deal Tabcorp says will strengthen its gaming services division and add $20 million to underlying earnings.

Rio Tinto says Australia is ‘‘overdue’’ for a top quality minerals discovery and declared it has an ‘‘exploration chequebook’’ ready to help back potential partners.

Page 19: Mining giant Rio Tinto and its technology services partner Accenture have claimed success on an ambitious program to shift its core systems to a new cloud-based delivery model, despite insiders claiming the project was late and causing ‘‘chaotic’’ problems and unplanned outages.

Page 25: Woolworths is under growing pressure to settle an unconscionable conduct case with the competition regulator amid signs that poor relationships with suppliers are stymying its attempts to revive supermarket sales.

Page 31: Australia’s third-biggest hotel operator, Choice Hotels, is eyeing opportunities in the serviced apartment market as it joins its New York-listed global parents in competing with Airbnb.

Page 34: PricewaterhouseCoopers chief executive Luke Sayers says the confidence of boards to govern with authority has been undermined by the rate of change, which has rendered much of their experience irrelevant.

 

 

The Australian

Page 3: Australians identifying as gay, lesbian or bisexual are better qualified and earn more, according to one of the few studies into the economic effects of sexuality, calling into question moves by a leading education foundation to link high school scholarships with sexual orientation.

Page 8: Online wagering rivals have joined forces to launch a national campaign against South Australia’s new “punters tax”, appealing to gamblers to lobby local members to kill the budget measure.

Page 21: The company rolling out the National Broadband Network has called for an overhaul of the scheme that compensates Telstra for ensuring basic phone services are provided to the bush.

Two subsidiaries of beleaguered music streaming service Guvera have been returned to Guvera management after two creditor meetings yesterday.

Page 22: Fresh from enjoying one of its best years in memory, Australia’s gold sector is wasting no time talking shares higher.

The West Australian newspaper has opened the door to forced redundancies after the company failed to meet its targeted job reductions through voluntary cuts.

Page 23: Banks aggressively chasing loans are putting future profitability at risk as margins are crunched by falling official interest rates that are failing to inspire widespread demand from borrowers or inflation, experts say.

Page 27: The investors cheering for Amazon, Apple & Facebook Earnings season in Australia is yet to get fully under way, but many local investors have already received a welcome bump to their international share portfolios thanks to a fortunate favouring of Wall-street listed “tech titans”.

Page 29: Healthcare is shaping up as the next frontier for digital technology, but that doesn’t mean we have to reinvent the wheel, according to Zebra Technologies’ senior technology director Wayne Harper.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: WA Labor is making a pitch for blue-collar voters, with a policy that guarantees subcontractors will be paid for work on government projects and aims to tighten protections on private building schemes.

Page 7: The head of one of WA’s biggest charities is fine-tuning a plan to let private investors profit from getting mentally unwell people out of Graylands Hospital.

Page 12: Treasurer Mike Nahan has unleashed a fresh round of Liberal leadership chatter after pointedly accusing an unnamed frontbench colleague or colleagues of destabilising Colin Barnett.

Page 18: Australian Grains Champion director Brad Jones has added his $2 worth to the debate over the $2.56 billion value put on grower-controlled CBH.

Iluka Resources will double its rutile resource base with the $375 million takeover of London-listed, Africa-focused miner Sierra Rutile.

Company director Tracey Horton has been chosen to become chairwoman of $2.2 billion global education provider Navitas.

Page 19: Metals X called a trading halt late yesterday ahead of a “proposed restructuring and co-incident capital raising”, only hours after executive director Peter Cook talked up the benefit of a spin-out of its gold assets.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options