27/04/2016 - 06:30

Morning Headlines

27/04/2016 - 06:30

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Shell to axe jobs as cost cuts hit home

Royal Dutch Shell will axe hundreds of jobs around Australia in the weeks ahead as the oil and gas giant’s global cost-cutting drive starts to bite locally. The Aus

Budget scramble to fill NDIS hole

The government is hunting for more welfare savings in next week’s federal budget to fill a shortfall in the National Disability Insurance Scheme, triggering a clash with Labor over claims that the program was “fully” funded. The Aus

Multinationals work to beat the ‘Google Tax’

Foreign companies are already gaming the system to avoid paying the Multinational Anti-Avoidance Law (MAAL) that was introduced on January 1, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has warned. The Fin

Regions cash ‘made the difference’

Nationals leader Terry Redman has labelled as “disappointing” comments by Colin Barnett signalling a tougher approach to the Royalties for Regions program. The West

ALP plans to close coal plants

Bill Shorten will today commit a future Labor government to a two-step emissions trading scheme that will lead to the closure of Australia’s coal-fired power stations. The West

Streaming service collapses

Quickflix boss Stephen Langsford is adamant he did everything he could to save the now-collapsed streaming service but was hamstrung by one of its main competitors “putting the foot on the jugular”. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Two low-cost emissions trading schemes and a big boost for renewable energy are at the centre of Labor’s climate change policy, which aims to reduce Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions to a net zero by 2050.

The federal government is leaning towards matching part of Labor’s superannuation policy in next week’s budget by charging 30 per cent tax on super contributions by people who earn more than $250,000.

Page 3: Australia has been dealt an election-eve headache over its asylum-seeker policy after Papua New Guinea’s Supreme Court declared the 15-year-old Manus Island detention centre illegal, also casting doubt over the government’s $1.2 billion contract with centre operator Broadspectrum, formerly Transfield Services.

Page 4: Foreign companies are already gaming the system to avoid paying the Multinational Anti-Avoidance Law (MAAL) that was introduced on January 1, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has warned.

Page 7: Technology entrepreneur Simon Hackett has put $730,000 where his mouth is and installed a giant battery pack supplied by a company he chairs to power a business park he owns in Adelaide, Base 64.

Page 10: UniSuper chief executive Kevin O’Sullivan is under pressure from one of the $52 billion superannuation fund’s union overseers, which wants him to recant his opposition to a royal commission into banks.

Page 13: Catherine Brenner is emerging as a leading internal candidate to replace outgoing chair Simon McKeon, who surprised the sharemarket on Tuesday with a decision to leave after less than two years due to ‘‘a change in my circumstances’’.

Page 18: SurfStitch chairman Howard McDonald is under pressure to update investors on the likelihood of a takeover offer as shares in the online action sports retailer sink to record lows.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: The Turnbull government will build all 12 new submarines in South Australia to shore up its political support in the state, despite being warned by France that this would be a slower and more expensive option.

Page 2: The government is hunting for more welfare savings in next week’s federal budget to fill a shortfall in the National Disability Insurance Scheme, triggering a clash with Labor over claims that the program was “fully” funded.

Page 3: Investigators probing possible Medicare fraud by doctors and others in the health system have sent 17 briefs of evidence to the Director of Public Prosecutions this financial year and tallied taxpayer losses of $1.6 million.

Page 19: Royal Dutch Shell will axe hundreds of jobs around Australia in the weeks ahead as the oil and gas giant’s global cost-cutting drive starts to bite locally.

German discounter Aldi will tighten its hold on the multibillion-dollar ski and snow gear sector when it unveils its winter sale this year, using its scale as the biggest seller of ski apparel in Australia to slash prices and appeal to higher-income households.

Page 20: Acquisitive miner Metals X will weigh up the merits of spinning off its base metals assets after effectively snapping up the Nifty copper mine in Western Australia “for free”.

Page 21: Australia’s first online video and DVD rental service Quickflix has been placed in voluntary administration after rival streaming service Stan stonewalled its attempts to raise new capital.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Perth and South West households have slashed their water use since dire warnings of shortages last year, potentially sparing the need for tougher restrictions.

Page 3: Indian entrepreneurs Radhika and Pankaj Oswal will knock down their controversial Peppermint Grove property nicknamed the Taj Mahal on Swan and build luxury units, keeping one for themselves.

Page 6: WA will get tens of billions of dollars worth of work maintaining and supplying Australia’s dozen new submarines.

Page 12: Bill Shorten will today commit a future Labor government to a two-step emissions trading scheme that will lead to the closure of Australia’s coal-fired power stations.

Page 16: Nationals leader Terry Redman has labelled as “disappointing” comments by Colin Barnett signalling a tougher approach to the Royalties for Regions program.

Business: The Federal Court has temporarily lifted travel restrictions on Continental Coal executive director Peter Landau after the corporate watchdog yesterday agreed to allow Mr Landau to visit Britain on business this month.

Quickflix boss Stephen Langsford is adamant he did everything he could to save the now-collapsed streaming service but was hamstrung by one of its main competitors “putting the foot on the jugular”.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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