22/03/2016 - 06:48

Morning Headlines

22/03/2016 - 06:48

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PM pulls the trigger

Malcolm Turnbull has launched a daring bid to secure an election victory by forcing the Senate to decide on crucial workplace relations reforms within weeks, firing the starter’s gun on a double dissolution to be held on July 2 where he will seek a mandate for his economic agenda. The Aus

$1b at stake in Roy Hill mine row, court

A wide-ranging row over the Roy Hill iron ore project between the developer and its head contractor has been described in court as a $1 billion dispute. The West

Pay brawl looms as poll issue for Barnett

Unions are threatening industrial action in Western Australia in the lead-up to next year’s state election as they prepare to fight a hardline government wages policy that will leave public servants worse off. The Aus

Virgin shareholders provide $425m loan

Virgin Australia has bought itself more time to fix its ailing balance sheet after obtaining a 12-month, $425 million unsecured loan from its four major shareholders, Air New Zealand, Etihad Airways, Singapore Airlines and Virgin Group. The Fin

Telstra and News in tricky Foxtel accord

The $8 billion Foxtel float that could follow its proposed merger with Fox Sports would not be a divorce between the pay TV giant’s shareholders but a delicate accord after a fractious, sometimes messy but ultimately profitable 21-year marriage. The Fin

Morrison dumps GST on bitcoin

Treasurer Scott Morrison said digital currencies such as bitcoin will be exempt from GST and restrictions on crowdfunding eased, under changes to boost the fintech sector. The Fin

Kids’ hospital faces second open delay

Health Minister Kim Hames has left open the possibility that the new Perth Children’s Hospital will not be open by the end of this year — more than 12 months after it was originally planned. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: ASX chief executive Elmer Funke Kupper said he quit because he needed to put the integrity of the sharemarket operator ahead of his own interests while the police probe a possible bribe made when he ran Tabcorp.

Page 3: The Australian Securities and Investments Commission has said it will investigate the reasons Dick Smith failed.

Page 7: Labor leader Bill Shorten will fight an election on health and education funding and climate change. But another Coalition weak point, he believes, is its apparent plan to cut company taxes in the budget.

Page 8: Even a modest company tax cut of 1.5 percentage points would stimulate the economy and eventually flow through to higher wages, leading economist John Freebairn says.

Page 9: Malcolm Turnbull’s chief innovation adviser warned that dividend imputation may encourage Australian business to hand out cash dividends rather than invest in innovation.

Page 15: Virgin Australia has bought itself more time to fix its ailing balance sheet after obtaining a 12-month, $425 million unsecured loan from its four major shareholders, Air New Zealand, Etihad Airways, Singapore Airlines and Virgin Group.

Page 17: The $8 billion Foxtel float that could follow its proposed merger with Fox Sports would not be a divorce between the pay TV giant’s shareholders but a delicate accord after a fractious, sometimes messy but ultimately profitable 21-year marriage.

Embattled vocational education outfit Australian Careers Network is operating on a skeleton staff, after shedding 600 positions in the past six months.

Page 18: Treasurer Scott Morrison said digital currencies such as bitcoin will be exempt from GST and restrictions on crowdfunding eased, under changes to boost the fintech sector.

Page 23: NBN’s chief executive Bill Morrow says a recent trip to meet US tech giants including Google and Facebook has reaffirmed that the company is following the correct approach to roll out the national broadband network, despite renewed speculation it could shift to faster technology.

Page 25: One of Australia’s largest software services providers to sporting and private clubs, MSL Solutions, is raising $5 million to facilitate an international expansion, ahead of an ASX listing in the next 12 to 18 months.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Malcolm Turnbull has launched a daring bid to secure an election victory by forcing the Senate to decide on crucial workplace relations reforms within weeks, firing the starter’s gun on a double dissolution to be held on July 2 where he will seek a mandate for his economic agenda.

Page 3: Safe Schools operatives have been coaching educators to dismiss parental concerns over the contentious sex and gender diversity program, asserting that parents are powerless to shut it down.

Page 9: Unions are threatening industrial action in Western Australia in the lead-up to next year’s state election as they prepare to fight a hardline government wages policy that will leave public servants worse off.

Page 19: Business leaders have backed Malcolm Turnbull’s surprise strike on union power, with former National Commission of Audit boss Tony Shepherd urging obstructionist senators to “do something for the country” by allowing the re-establishment of the building industry watchdog.

Student accommodation, a real estate asset class long on the periphery for local institutional investors, has hit the big time following a series of deals by heavyweight Australian players.

Page 20: Retiring Rio Tinto chief executive Sam Walsh has hosed down the notion that his replacement, Jean-Sebastien Jacques, will make rapid-fire copper acquisitions.

Page 29: A new start-up from the former managing director of JPMorgan Asia Pacific promises to better educate investors on how to tackle the vagaries of the stockmarket through a game in which they can earn real cash.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: The bar is set so low on national literacy and numeracy tests that a Year 9 student could meet the minimum standard by reading below the level of a Year 5 student, a report has found.

Page 9: The growing popularity of cycling in Perth has begun to transform significantly into more people riding to work.

Page 10: WA Labor has opened up a 15-point credibility gap over the Liberals on the key question of who has a better public transport blueprint.

Page 11: Health Minister Kim Hames has left open the possibility that the new Perth Children’s Hospital will not be open by the end of this year — more than 12 months after it was originally planned.

Business: A wide-ranging row over the Roy Hill iron ore project between the developer and its head contractor has been described in court as a $1 billion dispute.

Dale Alcock has bought Garry Brown-Neaves out of the ABN Group, ending one of the State’s longest and most successful business partnerships.

New Santos boss Kevin Gallagher has begun to swing the axe, disposing of long-serving senior executives James Baulderstone and Trevor Brown, and appointing Woodside Petroleum and Azure Capital alumni.

EY has bought WA’s top tax law firm, Norton & Smailes, giving its Perth practice a firm foothold in the legal space as the Big Four accountancy groups widen their reach in search of new revenue.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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