17/02/2016 - 06:59

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17/02/2016 - 06:59

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Meat processor drives SW air freight link bid

WA’s biggest meat processor is backing a campaign to upgrade Busselton-Margaret River Airport for international freight after securing unprecedented access to the Chinese market. The West

Qantas WiFi in sky to tap NBN

The launch of in-flight internet on Australian flights is within sight as Qantas and US satellite company ViaSat edge towards a deal to provide passengers with WiFi access. The Fin

Shell to shed jobs in restructure

With the $90 billion takeover of BG Group complete, Royal Dutch Shell – now the country’s biggest foreign investor – will restructure its Australian business, resulting in hundreds of job losses, probably in Brisbane and Perth. The Aus

Tax system a ‘threat’ to stability

National Australia Bank chief executive Andrew Thorburn assured Australians the economy is well placed to weather global market volatility and the unemployment rate would need to hit 10 per cent before the bank’s loan book was affected. The Fin

Anglo paves way for exit from coalfields

Global mining giant Anglo American could sell all of its Australian coal mines as it looks to offload another $US3 billion to $US4 billion in assets in 2016 under a sharp acceleration of its restructuring plan. The Fin

Aussies smeared in FIFA election row

Australian powerbrokers in international labour organisations and world sport have been enmeshed in a vicious smear campaign centred around this month’s election of the FIFA president to replace banned world football boss Sepp Blatter. The Aus

Doray chief already looking a few steps ahead

Doray Minerals’ Deflector project near Yalgoo is still a few months away from pouring its first gold, but the company’s board is already thinking about its next steps, managing director Allan Kelly says. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: National Australia Bank chief executive Andrew Thorburn assured Australians the economy is well placed to weather global market volatility and the unemployment rate would need to hit 10 per cent before the bank’s loan book was affected.

Page 3: A former project manager at Clive Palmer’s Queensland Nickel has urged other employees and creditors to vote against any rescue package proposed by the resources owner, saying he could not be trusted with the future of the Townsville refinery.

Federal politicians who accept donations from gas, coal and oil companies are about to become the next target of climate campaigners.

Page 4: Resources Minister Josh Frydenberg has pushed the case for coal seam gas as he acknowledged a shortage of domestic gas supplies and gas suppliers.

Treasurer Scott Morrison will use a pre-budget speech on Wednesday to target spending, conceding that the government has spent most of the savings it had made since coming to office in 2013.

Page 5: Negative gearing is blamed for pushing up property prices but many experts – including some in Treasury – argue the real culprit is the generous 50 per cent capital gains tax discount.

Page 8: Building a sophisticated underground nuclear waste storage facility could cost up to $33 billion and would need a substantial commitment from foreign customers before it could be built, nuclear inquiry royal commissioner Kevin Scarce said.

Page 11: Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida has delivered a blunt message to Canberra that only its bid to build Australia’s new $50 billion submarine fleet can provide the crucial ‘‘strategic’’ element.

Page 15: CSL chief executive Paul Perreault said that a strong culture that is committed to research is the key for the biotechnology giant to deliver new technologies and enjoy another 100 years at the top.

Page 17: Global mining giant Anglo American could sell all of its Australian coal mines as it looks to offload another $US3 billion to $US4 billion in assets in 2016 under a sharp acceleration of its restructuring plan.

Page 21: Woolworths has admitted tapping suppliers for extra payments after finding a $53 million hole in 2014 profits, but says its demands were consistent with the ‘‘ordinary nature’’ of retailer and supplier relationships.

Australians can expect to pay more for products such as soft drink and beer, with falling oil prices failing to translate into lower energy costs for the country’s biggest manufacturers, says the boss of packaging company Orora.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Turnbull government ministers are being told “just stop spending” as Scott Morrison and Malcolm Turnbull prepare for an unusual low-spending pre-election budget.

Page 3: The launch of in-flight internet on Australian flights is within sight as Qantas and US satellite company ViaSat edge towards a deal to provide passengers with WiFi access.

Page 4: A radical plan to impose direct charges on motorists could help add almost $35 billion a year to the national economy by 2040, modelling commissioned by Infrastructure Australia finds.

Page 6: Australian powerbrokers in international labour organisations and world sport have been enmeshed in a vicious smear campaign centred around this month’s election of the FIFA president to replace banned world football boss Sepp Blatter.

Page 8: Australia has an “unshakable” commitment to freedom of navigation through disputed regions of the South China Sea, Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has said, warning that Beijing must not intimidate its neighbours over the issue at a time of growing regional instability.

Page 20: With the $90 billion takeover of BG Group complete, Royal Dutch Shell – now the country’s biggest foreign investor – will restructure its Australian business, resulting in hundreds of job losses, probably in Brisbane and Perth.

Anticipation is mounting that Woolworths will announce details of an independent expert’s valuation of its loss-making Masters hardware chain and, potentially, the name of its new chief executive, when it reports its half-year results.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Exam markers have raised concerns about widespread problems with "illegible" handwriting that was in some cases "almost indecipherable" in last year's WA Certificate of Education exams.

Page 3: WA’s most senior Labor MP Gary Gray will retire from Federal politics at the next election, triggering wholesale renewal of Federal ALP ranks.

Page 4: WA property groups fear changes by the Labor Party to negative gearing and capital gains tax will hurt the housing market and deliver a “double whammy” to mum and dad investors.

Page 5: WA’s vaccination figures reveal the number of conscientious objectors fell to 3500 in December as welfare penalties for parents who did not vaccinate children loomed.

Page 15: Thousands of new homes could be built on the doorstep of the Swan Valley under plans that could also result in new primary and secondary schools to service the fast-growing north-east metropolitan corridor.

Page 18: Staff morale at the University of WA is low after plans were revealed for large-scale redundancies and a major restructure, finances are precarious and demand for undergraduate courses is down.

Business: WA’s biggest meat processor is backing a campaign to upgrade Busselton-Margaret River Airport for international freight after securing unprecedented access to the Chinese market.

Doray MineralsDeflector project near Yalgoo is still a few months away from pouring its first gold, but the company’s board is already thinking about its next steps, managing director Allan Kelly says.

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