29/01/2016 - 07:08

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29/01/2016 - 07:08

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Detours on road to Quay

More than three decades of talk, controversy and blueprints that failed to materialise will today culminate in the public unveiling of Perth’s waterfront development, Elizabeth Quay. The West

Samsung flags $1b losses at Roy Hill

Roy Hill head contractor Samsung C&T has confirmed industry expectations of a budget blowout by flagging a $1 billion loss on the Pilbara iron ore project. The West

State secrets

The Barnett Government has invoked commercial confidentiality as a reason to not answer questions from the media and in the Parliament on at least 30 occasions, raising questions about its claim to be an open and transparent administration. The West

Stan takes fight to Netflix by landing Showtime

Stan has stepped up its fight with larger rival Netflix by signing a long-term exclusive licensing agreement with US cable giant CBS for its Showtime content, including the much-hyped hit show Billions – which Stan premiered this week. The Fin

Investors back M2, Vocus merger

Takeover target M2’s shareholders have backed the $3 billion merger of the telco with rival Vocus Communications, a deal that will see the combined entity become Australia’s fourth-largest telco. The Aus

Xenophon play for Senate rejig

Independent senator Nick Xenophon will join the Greens in pressuring the government to pass laws before the next federal election to stop micro-parties gaming the system with complex preference deals to win Senate spots. The Fin

Journo’s leaving ‘needs inquiry’

ABC boss Mark Scott is being urged to commission a full investigation into the departure of technology journalist Nick Ross, who claims to have been pressured over critical reporting of the Coalition’s policy on the National Broadband Network. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The federal election has begun as a race between big-spending social policy and a tax overhaul, after federal Labor put education on the agenda with a promise of an extra $4.5 billion for schools by the end of the decade.

Page 3: The market for law graduates who want to become lawyers is improving but demand continues to completely outstrip supply.

Page 5: Australia is set to miss out on a senior role within the newly-established Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank because of its initial reluctance to join the organisation.

Page 6: Independent senator Nick Xenophon will join the Greens in pressuring the government to pass laws before the next federal election to stop micro-parties gaming the system with complex preference deals to win Senate spots.

Page 7: Debts accrued by Clive Palmer’s failed Townsville nickel refinery have topped $100 million as questions emerge about the ability of the resources owner turned federal MP to continue to fund the Yabulu refinery even if it is able to trade out of voluntary administration.

Page 9: In a submission responding to the Productivity Commission’s workplace relations inquiry, the Australian Industry Group has opposed a recommendation that workers be able to opt out of the proposed new enterprise contracts after 12 months.

Page 12: Dick Smith’s administrators and receivers have been given six months to find a buyer for the business and its assets.

Page 13: Stan has stepped up its fight with larger rival Netflix by signing a long-term exclusive licensing agreement with US cable giant CBS for its Showtime content, including the much-hyped hit show Billions – which Stan premiered this week.

Page 15: The logistics company chaired by Chris Corrigan, Qube Holdings, and investors in North America and China made a $8.85 billion counter-offer for rail and port operator Asciano that tops a bid from Canada’s Brookfield Asset Management.

United States debt markets are giving companies a ‘‘major opportunity’’ to cheaply reduce their gearing, according to Fortescue Metals Group chief executive Nev Power.

Page 17: It has been Newcrest Mining’s problem child for many years, but the Lihir mine in Papua New Guinea is finally starting to hit its straps.

Page 18: Local banks and payment companies are nutting out a security protocol for digital wallets to avoid a repeat of the spike in identity theft when Apple Pay was introduced in the United States.

Page 24: Big miners are now feeling the consequences of their own behaviour and should regret their vow to continue growing dividends, according to the outspoken boss of loss-making US miner Cliffs.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Treasury secretary John Fraser has warned the Turnbull government its prized AAA-credit rating is in jeopardy unless urgent efforts are made to cut spending, raising the spectre of a federal interest bill of more than $2 billion a month within a decade.

Page 4: Labor has pledged to pour $37 billion extra into schools over the next decade, soaking up most of the savings it has announced since losing office and fuelling doubts about the opposition’s commitment to reduce the budget deficit.

Page 6: ABC boss Mark Scott is being urged to commission a full investigation into the departure of technology journalist Nick Ross, who claims to have been pressured over critical reporting of the Coalition’s policy on the National Broadband Network.

Page 17: World financial markets have overreacted to news of the slowdown in the Chinese economy, says Bob Carr, director of the Australia-China Relations Institute at UTS.

Page 18: Downer chief executive Grant Fenn is to be grilled under oath about the engineering group’s disastrous $1.9 billion Waratah train project in a trial beginning next week.

Page 19: Virgin Australia has pulled the plug on flights to and from Vanuatu as the Pacific island’s international runway continues to deteriorate to dangerous levels.

Takeover target M2’s shareholders have backed the $3 billion merger of the telco with rival Vocus Communications, a deal that will see the combined entity become Australia’s fourth-largest telco.

Page 21: Investa Property Group’s wholesale commercial property fund is seeking to buy the management platform owned by Morgan Stanley for an unspecified figure, as competition for the business intensifies.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: The Barnett Government has invoked commercial confidentiality as a reason to not answer questions from the media and in the Parliament on at least 30 occasions, raising questions about its claim to be an open and transparent administration.

Page 6: More than three decades of talk, controversy and blueprints that failed to materialise will today culminate in the public unveiling of Perth’s waterfront development, Elizabeth Quay.

Page 11: Thousands of Perth’s biggest water-guzzling households have been sent letters by the Water Corporation in a bid to encourage them to curb their use.

Page 14: Bill Shorten is betting his electoral future on returning $37 billion to the nation’s schools over the next decade.

Page 21: A $5 billion Federal Government “bank” to develop northern parts of WA will have to sink its money into projects that boost the local economy and increase population.

Business: Roy Hill head contractor Samsung C&T has confirmed industry expectations of a budget blowout by flagging a $1 billion loss on the Pilbara iron ore project.

The State Government’s Future Fund faces big capital losses from buying the Government’s own debt, after entering the market shortly before last year’s bond market plunge.

Carnarvon Petroleum has moved to consolidate its North West Shelf status by securing a stake in a project held by joint venture partner and operator Quadrant Energy.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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