19/01/2016 - 06:56

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19/01/2016 - 06:56

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Paladin flags lower guidance revisions

Uranium miner Paladin Energy has flagged a likely revision to its full-year production guidance but has managed to build larger cash reserves than expected despite weak uranium prices. The Fin

Tunnel’s $8.5b windfall

The Perth Freight Link, including a tunnel under Beaconsfield and White Gum Valley, will increase property values in surrounding suburbs by $8.5 billion in a decade, Transport Minister Dean Nalder says. The West

Big shipment helps Wellard sail through troubles

Wellard Ltd believes it is well placed to take advantage of strong demand for cattle in South-East Asia despite engine problems with two of its vessels that have hampered shipments. The West

ACCC vows petrol price crack down

Competition tsar Rod Sims has vowed to crack down on inflated petrol prices, warning retailers need to trim up to 7¢ a litre at the pump, given the fall in the price of oil to a fresh 12-year low. The Fin

Aurizon hit by Qld Nickel collapse

Rail company Aurizon is shaping as the biggest creditor from the financial collapse of Clive Palmer’s Queensland Nickel which was placed into voluntary administration on Monday. The Fin

Strikes to hit economy for $40m

The nationwide shutdown of Patrick stevedore’s port terminals over the past 24 hours threatens to cost Australia’s economy more than $40 million, with another hit to the national output expected from more strikes later this month. The Aus

Qantas workers seal pay deal

Qantas has concluded a six-month negotiation with 100 of its engineers to finalise a new enterprise agreement that will earn the workers a one-time 5 per cent bonus but also lock them into an 18-month pay freeze. The Aus

China giant eyes WA farm assets expansion

A giant Chinese conglomerate is looking to expand its footprint in WA despite mixed results from its initial investment of $78 million in farmland. Beidahuang, based in Harbin and operating in Australia as Heilongjiang Feng Agricultural, also wants to expand into other States as it eyes assets in livestock, cropping, grain trading and logistics. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 2: Treasurer Scott Morrison has ordered the sale of eight more properties owned by investors he says have breached foreign investment laws.

Page 3: Rail company Aurizon is shaping as the biggest creditor from the financial collapse of Clive Palmer’s Queensland Nickel which was placed into voluntary administration on Monday.

Global tennis administrators were forced to deny allegations of widespread corruption and match-fixing, including by current high-ranking players, at a hastily convened press conference on the opening day of the Australian Open.

Page 5: Competition tsar Rod Sims has vowed to crack down on inflated petrol prices, warning retailers need to trim up to 7¢ a litre at the pump, given the fall in the price of oil to a fresh 12-year low.

Page 6: Communications Minister Mitch Fifield says changes to media ownership laws need to recognise the importance of local content but not at the expense of putting television broadcasters out of business.

Page 15: The low oil price is poised to propel airline operating margins to the highest level since the mid-1960s this year, although margins will decline slightly next year as the oil price rises and fleets grow more rapidly than usual, according to a leading aviation analysis group.

The hottest deals in mining in 2016 will be the buying and restructuring of companies out of insolvencies, and picking up assets miners are selling to help fix balance sheets, advisers say.

Page 16: The local private wealth industry is set for another shake-up after National Australia Bank signalled it would snap up a remaining stake in JBWere, to coincide with the 175-year old business signing an alliance with UBS.

Page 18: Uranium miner Paladin Energy has flagged a likely revision to its full-year production guidance but has managed to build larger cash reserves than expected despite weak uranium prices.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: GPs should be given stronger guidance about how to diagnose autism to prevent “doctor shopping” by desperate families trying to access funding for their children that is tied to a medical definition, researchers say.

Page 4: The nationwide shutdown of Patrick stevedore’s port terminals over the past 24 hours threatens to cost Australia’s economy more than $40 million, with another hit to the national output expected from more strikes later this month.

Page 5: Families could soon spend more than half a million dollars on one child’s education, according to a national costs forecast.

Page 6: The Turnbull government should face no legal restrictions in providing key crossbench senators with redacted versions of the secret volumes from the trade union royal commission report, according to a legal expert, amid increasing calls for all parties to be given access to the documents.

Page 17: BHP Billiton’s $US7.2 billion ($10.4bn) US shale writedown is set to deliver the worst loss in the miner’s history when it reports first-half earnings next month, and the first loss reported by the company in 17 years.

Page 19: Beleaguered training company Australian Careers Network says it will not receive $40 million in expected government payments.

Qantas has concluded a six-month negotiation with 100 of its engineers to finalise a new enterprise agreement that will earn the workers a one-time 5 per cent bonus but also lock them into an 18-month pay freeze.

Page 20: Commonwealth Bank has urged the Turnbull government to look beyond law enforcement in its long-awaited review of Australia’s cyber defences, arguing that trust and confidence are critical elements in a healthy and growing digital environment.

Page 24: Driverless technology is developing at such a fast pace that self-driving cars are likely to hit the streets well before 2020.

Page 26: The race for the Investa Office Fund could be drawn out further as rocky equity markets slice into a scrip-heavy $2.5 billion takeover play by Dexus Property Group and major investors are yet to be won over.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 4: Supporters of Transport Minister Dean Nalder believe his chances of winning preselection in Bateman, over backbencher Matt Taylor, have been bolstered by a pair of administrative decisions by the Liberal Party at the weekend.

The Perth Freight Link, including a tunnel under Beaconsfield and White Gum Valley, will increase property values in surrounding suburbs by $8.5 billion in a decade, Transport Minister Dean Nalder says.

The City of Subiaco says the planned City of Perth Bill will cost it $44 million in lost revenue over 10 years and warned that it might have to increase rates to bridge the gap.

Page 7: The beleaguered Yarloop community reached a rousing majority vote to stay put and rebuild their fire-ravaged town at a meeting in Harvey yesterday.

Business: Wellard Ltd believes it is well placed to take advantage of strong demand for cattle in South-East Asia despite engine problems with two of its vessels that have hampered shipments.

A giant Chinese conglomerate is looking to expand its footprint in WA despite mixed results from its initial investment of $78 million in farmland. Beidahuang, based in Harbin and operating in Australia as Heilongjiang Feng Agricultural, also wants to expand into other States as it eyes assets in livestock, cropping, grain trading and logistics.

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