24/11/2015 - 06:53

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24/11/2015 - 06:53

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Scarborough project retained

ExxonMobil and BHP Billiton have agreed to spend about $250 million to take the Scarborough project to a final investment decision after being granted what could be their last chance to retain ownership of the massive but remote gas resource. The West

Hospitals to give surgery ‘warranties’

Medibank Private has forced Healthscope, Australia’s second-biggest private hospital operator, to cover the cost of patients who are injured or become sick in its hospitals, a major shift in the power balance between insurers and hospitals. The Fin

Super apps mean fund members can check contributions

The nation’s largest industry superannuation fund, AustralianSuper, has warned errant employers its new mobile app will help members keep a closer eye on whether their contributions have been paid in full and on time. The Fin

Metals X bid dependent on timing

Acquisitive miner Metals X will persevere with its takeover bid for controversial copper producer Aditya Birla Minerals, but it has emphasised that time is of the essence. The Aus

Gerry Harvey faces possible strike and spill

Harvey Norman executive chairman Gerry Harvey has mounted a spirited defence of the retailer’s board structure and executive remuneration ahead of a possible second strike and spill motion at the annual meeting on Tuesday. The Fin

$40 a pack: ALP risks backlash from smokers

Opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen and health spokeswoman Catherine King today will announce that, if elected, Labor will continue the 12.5 per cent a year tax increase on tobacco to 2020. The Aus

Qantas, NIB to reward fit members

Qantas is muscling in on the lucrative $19 billion private health insurance sector, signing a deal with NIB to offer its 11 million frequent flyer members points towards their next flight — if they can attain certain fitness targets. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Medibank Private has forced Healthscope, Australia’s second-biggest private hospital operator, to cover the cost of patients who are injured or become sick in its hospitals, a major shift in the power balance between insurers and hospitals.

Lowering the corporate tax rate to 25 per cent from 30 per cent would deliver the economy a $291 billion growth dividend that would generate enough extra tax to more than pay for itself within five years.

Page 3: Indian energy giant Adani exaggerated the economic benefits of its $16.5 billion Carmichael mine in Central Queensland when gaining approval from the Native Title Tribunal, a court heard on Monday.

Page 4: Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has used his first appearance in Parliament since the Paris attacks to slap down former prime minister Tony Abbott and his supporters, who have called for Australian troops on the ground to fight against Islamic State terrorists.

Page 6: The cost of cigarettes will surge to more than $40 a pack under a future Labor government and put Australia back in line with the world’s most aggressive anti-tobacco jurisdictions.

Page 9: Harvey Norman executive chairman Gerry Harvey has mounted a spirited defence of the retailer’s board structure and executive remuneration ahead of a possible second strike and spill motion at the annual meeting on Tuesday.

Page 11: BHP Billiton will be forced to cut its dividend to protect its credit rating if commodity prices remain depressed, UBS analyst Glyn Lawcock says.

Rio Tinto’s national leadership ranks have been reshuffled, prompting the departure of the company’s managing director of Australian operations, Phil Edmands.

Page 12: The nation’s largest industry superannuation fund, AustralianSuper, has warned errant employers its new mobile app will help members keep a closer eye on whether their contributions have been paid in full and on time.

Page 19: UK-based online restaurant food delivery business Deliveroo will announce aggressive expansion plans including a completed $140 million capital raising to help fund a launch in Australia.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Labor is facing the same devastating defeat that it suffered at the last federal election, as Bill Shorten’s standing with voters as the alternative prime minister has tumbled to the lowest level for any ALP leader in more than a decade.

Page 2: Former ACTU secretary Bill Kelty has urged trade unions to set higher standards of internal governance and accept greater scrutiny and accountability over salaries and spending, or consider stronger regulation by government.

Page 4: Opposition Treasury spokesman Chris Bowen and health spokeswoman Catherine King today will announce that, if elected, Labor will continue the 12.5 per cent a year tax increase on tobacco to 2020.

Page 5: Public broadcaster SBS has defended a decision to publish an online article mocking job losses at the nation’s largest employer of journalists.

Page 19: Woolworths chairman Gordon Cairns has turned to the giant retailer’s most successful former chief executive, Roger Corbett, rehiring him as a consultant in a bid to arrest the company’s sliding performance and share price.

Vocation, the troubled private training provider, will raise capital from institutional and sophisticated investors as it tries to repair its balance sheet and continue as a going concern.

Australian investors are being offered a stake in the booming Chinese dairy market with the listing of one of northern China’s largest milk producers on the Australian stock exchange early next year.

Page 20: Acquisitive miner Metals X will persevere with its takeover bid for controversial copper producer Aditya Birla Minerals, but it has emphasised that time is of the essence.

Page 21: Qantas is muscling in on the lucrative $19 billion private health insurance sector, signing a deal with NIB to offer its 11 million frequent flyer members points towards their next flight — if they can attain certain fitness targets.

The first measure of national rental stress has revealed that not only are single and low-wage households paying as much as 65 per cent of their incomes towards housing — but now homes earning up to $70,000 are also being locked out of the inner city.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: WA’s Police Commissioner wants “tap and go” credit cards banned, claiming the lack of security around the technology is helping fuel the State’s rising crime problems.

Page 3: Teenagers will learn how to recognise controlling behaviour and treat their significant other with respect in WA classrooms as part of a bid to snuff out attitudes that can lead to domestic violence.

Page 7: Western Australians will next year be able to ski, snowboard and toboggan at the State’s first dry ski slopes for snow sports, with ambitious plans for the facility likely to be approved by Waroona council tonight.

Page 9: The deadly fires and freak winds that hit farms around Esperance have left a $150 million hole in what was shaping as a record harvest for the region.

Business: ExxonMobil and BHP Billiton have agreed to spend about $250 million to take the Scarborough project to a final investment decision after being granted what could be their last chance to retain ownership of the massive but remote gas resource.

Brierty’s directors say they are following to the letter dispute resolution processes with Main Roads WA over a contract blowout.

The world’s biggest mining companies face a combined $US10 billion ($13.9 billion) risk to their earnings if carbon pricing tightens in the wake of crucial global climate talks in Paris next week, according to a report from British non-profit organisation CDP.

The price will drop below $US40 a tonne before the end of the year, and trade in the $30s in 2016 as demand in China sputters, according to Mr Xie, an independent economist who has predicted a collapse since at least 2012.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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