13/11/2015 - 06:33

Morning Headlines

13/11/2015 - 06:33

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.

BHP falls erase China boom gains

The fall in BHP Billiton stock has destroyed almost all the share price wealth created by the world’s biggest mining company during China’s historic economic boom. The Fin

Chinese policy key to iron ore demand: Fortescue

Fortescue Metals Group managing director Nev Power says Chinese economic policy, rather than excess supply, should be the key driver of iron prices and whether Chinese steel demand grows, telling market watchers to track coming decisions, especially on mass transit. The Aus

Wesfarmers confident as retail offsets losses

Wesfarmers is evaluating potential acquisitions but will resist pressure to rush into making a purchase as losses in coal and weakness in its industrial operations threaten to offset gains in its retail portfolio this year. The Fin

Rinehart has 24 hours to pay $2m for costs

Mining billionaire Gina Rinehart must pay $1.93 million to her two eldest children by Friday afternoon to cover their legal costs over a bitter family trust dispute. The Fin

Southern Cross, Nine in $2.2bn merger talks

Nine Entertainment Company and Southern Cross Austereo have held direct negotiations towards a $2.2 billion merger that does not require changes to media ownership laws. The Aus

Upgrades to help Optus play EPL ball

Optus will spend tens of millions of dollars upgrading its fixed and mobile networks so it can broadcast English Premier League matches in high definition to as many homes and smartphones as possible. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The fall in BHP Billiton stock has destroyed almost all the share price wealth created by the world’s biggest mining company during China’s historic economic boom.

Page 4: Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull used a well-tried method to connect with Indonesian President Joko Widodo yesterday: find common ground in their professional lives.

Page 5: The government should dump a visa program aimed at attracting wealthy foreigners, suggesting the system is prone to rorts, money laundering and offers few benefits to Australians, the Productivity Commission said.

The Australian Taxation Office is cracking down on family businesses which misuse partnership and trust structures to shift profits and avoid paying income tax, with 75 companies already in its sights.

Page 7: Mining billionaire Gina Rinehart must pay $1.93 million to her two eldest children by Friday afternoon to cover their legal costs over a bitter family trust dispute.

Page 10: Australia and Germany have signed a new treaty on tax in the first step towards growing trade and investment between the nations and improving the integrity of the tax system by clamping down on multinational tax evasion.

Page 13: Wesfarmers is evaluating potential acquisitions but will resist pressure to rush into making a purchase as losses in coal and weakness in its industrial operations threaten to offset gains in its retail portfolio this year.

Page 16: Kerry Stokes has indicated his Seven West Media will consider taking in part in sector consolidation if cross-media ownership laws are abolished but said buying a regional television network to add to its metropolitan one was not on the company’s agenda.

Page 18: Singtel-Optus chief executive Allen Lew has promised local fans of the English Premier League that he will deliver multiple live games in high definition over the internet.

Page 23: Aurizon’s new chairman Tim Poole has left the door open to lifting the 15 per cent cap on individual shareholder stakes in the company to allow for a possible future merger or takeover.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Defence experts believe the new Chinese operator of the Port of Darwin should be placed under renewed scrutiny, amid evidence of its close and extensive links to the People’s Liberation Army and the group’s recent move to set up its own armed internal militia unit.

Page 6: The Turnbull government claims it is on track to meet its 2020 emissions reduction target after paying $557 million to secure 45 million tonnes of carbon abatement at an average of $12.25 a tonne.

Page 19: Nine Entertainment Company and Southern Cross Austereo have held direct negotiations towards a $2.2 billion merger that does not require changes to media ownership laws.

Page 20: Fortescue Metals Group managing director Nev Power says Chinese economic policy, rather than excess supply, should be the key driver of iron prices and whether Chinese steel demand grows, telling market watchers to track coming decisions, especially on mass transit.

Santos retail shareholders are staring at a 22 per cent loss after yesterday’s trading in the wake of a three-month strategic review that resulted in a $2.5 billion rights issue, a $500 million placement to a Chinese equity player and the $520m sale of Bass Strait gas interests.

Page 21: Optus will spend tens of millions of dollars upgrading its fixed and mobile networks so it can broadcast English Premier League matches in high definition to as many homes and smartphones as possible.

Page 22: Print declines for the country’s major newspapers have slowed over the past three months, while digital circulation and packaging deals are picking up the slack, according to the latest figures.

Page 25: Global miners including Rio Tinto and Iluka Resources have long made a pile of profit from digging up a sludgy commodity known as mineral sands, then shipping it to countries such as China, where it is used to whiten bathroom tiles or in household paints.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 4: Treasurer Mike Nahan has ruled out further land tax increases, promising yesterday that the changes in the May Budget would be the last under the Barnett Government.

Page 5: Tony Galati has pledged to donate at least $780,000 to Princess Margaret Hospital over the next 12 months if the State Government brings forward moves to scrap its potato marketing watchdog.

Page 14: The boss of the Water Corporation has lashed out at the “siloed” mentality within the State-owned utility that led to almost 140 people being exposed to asbestos.

Page 16: The Turnbull Government could consider last-minute offers from WA landholders to host a radioactive waste dump after the owner of the only proposed site in the State quit the bid at the eleventh hour.

Page 17: The State Government faces the embarrassing prospect of no airline services to the Northern Goldfields, Monkey Mia and Carnarvon after its tendering process hit turbulence.

Page 18: Out-of-work Western Australians are facing the toughest job market this century as the wind-up of the mining construction boom hits the State economy.

Page 29: WA’s health system would be overstretched if the State was hit by a major and deadly incident, according to the Government’s peak emergency management body.

Business: Wesfarmers managing director Richard Goyder says the company will back a recovery of its coal mining business as it heads for an annual earnings loss.

Media agency Carat is shedding up to three jobs from its 25-strong Perth workforce as the WA advertising climate continues to soften.

High costs and write-offs linked to the closure of its South Australian coal and power assets have pushed Alinta Energy’s parent deep into the red.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options