16/09/2015 - 06:57

Morning Headlines

16/09/2015 - 06:57

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.
Morning Headlines

WA makes Ord risk demand

The WA Government considers the development of two plots of land on the Ord River irrigation scheme so risky that it demanded a $150 million a year guarantee from the Chinese company behind the farming project. The West

Turnbull unites Coalition as business hopes surge

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has secured the support of the Nationals with $2 billion extra for stay-at-home mothers, giving the party control over water policy, and agreeing to support a tougher competition law - a pledge that led big business to warn its embrace of the new Liberal leader could sour quickly. The Fin

Woodside takes takeover offer directly to Oil Search investors

Woodside Petroleum advisers Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Gresham pitched their $11.6 billion takeover offer directly to Oil Search shareholders on Tuesday due to frustration over the lack of engagement from the Papua New Guinea-focused company’s board. The Fin

‘No evidence’ behind quarter of Medicare services

A quarter of the services listed on the $21 billion Medicare Benefits Schedule do not appear to be supported by evidence, while about 30 per cent of all healthcare treatments would be of little benefit to patients. The Aus

Women in favour for Cabinet jobs

WA’s Michaelia Cash, one of the senior members of the Right to swing behind Mr Turnbull, will likely enter Cabinet, along with Liberal moderate Marise Payne and Nationals senator Fiona Nash. The West

WA rushes to patch up Bell law

The State Government is trying to patch up its proposed Bell Group seizure laws amid fears of tax rows scuttling its plans to grab $700 million of litigation loot. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has secured the support of the Nationals with $2 billion extra for stay-at-home mothers, giving the party control over water policy, and agreeing to support a tougher competition law - a pledge that led big business to warn its embrace of the new Liberal leader could sour quickly.

Page 3: The national president of the militant construction union, Dave Hanna, resigned after an investigation found he obtained thousands of dollars from employers to pay for the IVF treatment of a union organiser and his partner.

Page 5: Labor leader Bill Shorten has written to new Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull offering to smoke the peace pipe over the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement.

Page 8: Liberal Premier Colin Barnett said on Tuesday that the leadership change represented a ‘‘very brutal period’’ that could not be dismissed as just part of politics.

Page 19: National Australia Bank is intent on floating its poorly performing Clydesdale Bank despite the market volatility that has hammered bank shares, and is promising investors significant scope to lift returns in the British business.

Page 21: Woodside Petroleum advisers Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Gresham pitched their $11.6 billion takeover offer directly to Oil Search shareholders on Tuesday due to frustration over the lack of engagement from the Papua New Guinea-focused company’s board.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: A quarter of the services listed on the $21 billion Medicare Benefits Schedule do not appear to be supported by evidence, while about 30 per cent of all healthcare treatments would be of little benefit to patients.

The China-Australia free-trade agreement will create jobs for Australians, says a senior Chinese foreign affairs official and former ambassador to Australia.

Page 2: Malcolm Turnbull has seized on the China-Australia free-trade agreement as a key point of political attack on Labor but faces pressure over his previous climate change policy stance and support for a same-sex marriage conscience vote.

Page 4: Joe Hockey is angry at being made the scapegoat for the fall of the Abbott government, believing the economy is doing well considering the headwinds from the China downturn and the end of the resource construction boom.

Page 11: The National Disability Insurance Scheme has stopped creating support plans for some children in South Australia as a botched funding strategy for the state, which underestimated the number of participants by half, begins to bite.

Page 23: Malcolm Turnbull’s sudden elevation to the prime ministership has improved the Coalition’s chances of achieving reform, especially on tax, but success will hinge on delicate negotiations with a still hostile Senate.

Page 24: Baffled analysts and investors are awaiting Woodside Petroleum’s next move with some trepidation after its lowball $11.7 billion scrip bid offer for Oil Search was knocked back, as widely predicted.

Page 28: China’s recent slowdown is worsening a problem for brewer SABMiller: despite the vast amount of beer consumed there, turning a decent profit isn’t easy.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: Malcolm Turnbull has won assurances from Tony Abbott that his leadership will not be white-anted, allowing the new Prime Minister to set about navigating the deep rifts caused by Monday’s coup.

Page 10: WA’s Michaelia Cash, one of the senior members of the Right to swing behind Mr Turnbull, will likely enter Cabinet, along with Liberal moderate Marise Payne and Nationals senator Fiona Nash.

Page 11: State Opposition Leader Mark McGowan has urged Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to use his ascension as a circuit breaker to ditch the “flawed” Perth freight link and fund urban rail in WA.

Page 17: State Fisheries Minister Ken Baston announced a raft of changes to the sector yesterday ahead of the season launch on October 15.

Page 26: Another area of Rottnest is to be opened up to private developers, with interest being sought in the creation of new “glamping” — or upmarket camping — accommodation near the island’s favourite swimming spot.

Business: The WA Government considers the development of two plots of land on the Ord River irrigation scheme so risky that it demanded a $150 million a year guarantee from the Chinese company behind the farming project.

German fertiliser and salt giant K+S is keen to set up an Australian presence, with the company understood to be checking out WA salt and potash opportunities.

The State Government is trying to patch up its proposed Bell Group seizure laws amid fears of tax rows scuttling its plans to grab $700 million of litigation loot.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options