24/07/2015 - 06:48

Morning Headlines

24/07/2015 - 06:48

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Morning Headlines

Abbott open to GST poll

Tony Abbott might take a GST increase to the next election but has warned the states any change will have to be part of a broader reform to ensure no overall rise in the tax take, rather than a straight revenue-raising exercise. The Fin

Myer combines gift-wrapping and e-commerce in world first

In a world first, retailer Myer is combining traditional department store services such as gift wrapping and "new world" services such as online ordering and click-and-collect in digital hubs located in the centre of its stores. The Fin

Graduate job hopes sink back to 1980s

Job prospects for new graduates are the worst they have been since the 1980s, with only 68 per cent of new bachelor graduates in fulltime work within four months of finishing their course, down from more than 80 per cent before the 2008 global financial crisis. The Aus

WA ‘coercing Bell creditors to settle’

The Western Australian government has been accused of using its threatened takeover of the Bell Group liquidation to coerce the company’s creditors into giving it a larger share of $1.7 billion in recovered assets. The Aus

Magnolia off and running with 25pc Meridian take

Liquefied Natural Gas has secured the first offtake deal for its $1 billion Magnolia LNG project in the US for a quarter of planned output. The West

Call to rescue sheep from horror market

Animals Australia has branded laws aimed at preventing cruelty in the live export industry a sham after making a series of complaints about a notorious market in the Middle East. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Tony Abbott might take a GST increase to the next election but has warned the states any change will have to be part of a broader reform to ensure no overall rise in the tax take, rather than a straight revenue-raising exercise.

Page 3: One in 10 Australians applying for a specialty occupation visa to work in the US are being rejected by American authorities, who are turning away people in less-sophisticated roles trying to flout the immigration rules.

Page 4: State hospitals would be paid based on a cost-control system that sets an efficient price for every medical procedure under an agreement between Prime Minister Tony Abbott and the premiers that revives one of the Rudd government’s signature policies.

Page 5: Labor leader Bill Shorten will announce on Friday that if elected he will announce a low-cost emissions trading scheme dealing in international permits to accompany a massive boost in renewable energy.

Page 8: Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull has told powerful free-to-air television bosses he will need ‘‘offsets’’ if he is to pursue the industry’s case for further cuts to its $153 million annual licence fees.

Page 10: Western Australia’s Minister for Mines, Bill Marmion, has voided several exploration applications lodged over Andrew Forrest’s Pilbara pastoral station by one of the billionaire’s mates.

Page 12: A fierce international competition to build a $20 billion frigate fleet is expected after the Abbott government dumped a tainted ‘‘low risk’’ option ahead of the release of next month’s defence white paper.

Page 13: In a world first, retailer Myer is combining traditional department store services such as gift wrapping and "new world" services such as online ordering and click-and-collect in digital hubs located in the centre of its stores.

Page 15: Newcrest Mining has achieved its full year production targets for gold and copper, after a June quarter that was easily its strongest of the 2015 financial year.

Page 19: Australia’s industrial gas users face a more-than-doubling in prices over the next three to five years, slashing profitability, driving up debt and potentially forcing plant closures, according to analysis on the gas market by ANZ Bank.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: A radical near-cashless welfare trial aimed at stemming the rivers of grog that entrench social catastrophe in remote towns will be implemented in three areas in close co-operation with the communities’ leaders.

Page 3: Job prospects for new graduates are the worst they have been since the 1980s, with only 68 per cent of new bachelor graduates in fulltime work within four months of finishing their course, down from more than 80 per cent before the 2008 global financial crisis.

Page 4: Tony Abbott has reached a provisional deal with premiers to explore tax reforms that could lead to an increase in the GST, with an admission that more revenue is needed to pay for crucial services.

Page 5: ANZ has become the first bank to revise home lending rates independently of the Reserve Bank in more than three years, as new limits to cool the investment property lending boom take hold.

Page 19: Energy provider AusNet’s plans to buy the NSW government’s $6 billion electricity transmission assets have been thrown into turmoil after two of its major Asian investors derailed funding plans for the acquisition target.

Wesfarmers retail guru Archie Norman calls the supermarket battles in Australia a “new era” that Coles must respond to early and that will inevitably affect the supply base.

Page 21: A band of Telstra’s competitors has demanded the Department of Communications to withdraw a submission it made to the competition regulator that backs the telco giant’s pleas to increase the regulated price rivals pay to access its fixed copper network.

The competition regulator has granted preliminary approval to NBN’s $800 million deal to buy and upgrade Optus’s cable network, in a decision described by its chairman as one of the hardest it will ever make.

Page 27: The Western Australian government has been accused of using its threatened takeover of the Bell Group liquidation to coerce the company’s creditors into giving it a larger share of $1.7 billion in recovered assets.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 5: Medicare coverage could be extended to public hospitals in a bid to slash soaring health costs.

The State Government will pay $62 million for a Port Hedland workers’ village it made a poorly timed investment in three years ago.

Page 11: Using a six-bed ward in Graylands psychiatric hospital for one patient had adversely affected two of WA’s biggest hospital emergency departments, Mental Health Minister Helen Morton said yesterday.

Page 12: Chief Justice Wayne Martin is calling on the Government to consider raising the forced retirement age of judges, who under a nearly 80-year-old law have to step down from the bench when they turn 70.

Page 14: Travellers are able to live in the lap of luxury as owners of multimillion-dollar Perth homes — some complete with ocean views and robots — open their doors to guests willing to part with more than $1000 a night.

Page 16: Bill Shorten will today declare an ambition to render Tony Abbott a one-term prime minister as he seeks to stare down a revolt in the ALP’s Left faction over asylum seeker boat arrivals.

Driverless cars on Australian roads will become a reality by the end of the year — and they could be headed to WA.

Page 19: Move over Holden and Ford — the roads are being taken over by European and Japanese-made vehicles.

Business: Empired’s Russell Baskerville were last night named among the winners at the 2015 regional EY Entrepreneur of the Year awards.

Animals Australia has branded laws aimed at preventing cruelty in the live export industry a sham after making a series of complaints about a notorious market in the Middle East.

Australia’s trade relationship with Indonesia has been dealt another blow after Jakarta’s shock decision to increase import tariffs on a range of food and consumer products.

Liquefied Natural Gas has secured the first offtake deal for its $1 billion Magnolia LNG project in the US for a quarter of planned output.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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