12/06/2015 - 06:10

Morning Headlines

12/06/2015 - 06:10

Bookmark

Upgrade your subscription to use this feature.
Morning Headlines

‘True Aussie’ brand to test world’s appetite

All Australian food could be sold overseas using a single brand and logo that agricultural producers hope will enhance Australia’s global reputation for high-quality food and reduce competing marketing campaigns. The Fin

Don’t go alone on tax: Rio to Hockey

Mining giant Rio Tinto has urged the federal government not to go it alone in fighting multinational tax avoidance, warning it could lead to companies being double-taxed and make doing business harder. The Aus

Aurizon’s Hockridge slams local complacency

Aurizon chief executive Lance Hockridge has attacked Australia’s ‘‘she’ll be right’’ attitude for nurturing complacency and undermining the competitiveness of the nation’s freight and transport infrastructure. The Fin

John Holland win offers others FIFO tax hope

Contractors flying workers to projects in areas classified as “non-remote” by the Australian Tax Office may benefit from a big fringe benefits tax win for John Holland in the Federal Court yesterday. The West

Wind farms may harm health: PM

Tony Abbott has declared himself anti-wind farm, saying they look awful, make too much noise and might even cause health problems. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page S1: Australia must adapt radical new user-pays systems for roads and other transport, including technology such as dynamic pricing and even satellite tracking, or face mounting congestion that will damage productivity and living standards.

Aurizon chief executive Lance Hockridge has attacked Australia’s ‘‘she’ll be right’’ attitude for nurturing complacency and undermining the competitiveness of the nation’s freight and transport infrastructure.

Page S2: Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull says he’s ‘‘relaxed’’ about Telstra pulling out of national broadband network construction tenders and that it’s impossible to future-proof the NBN.

The resources sector is likely to embark on a selling spree of infrastructure assets as it cuts costs following the slump in commodity prices, Transfield Services chief executive Graeme Hunt has said.

Page 1: Employers will get new rights to direct their workers to take leave or offer to buy out up to two weeks of leave a year, under a major victory for companies in the Fair Work Commission.

All Australian food could be sold overseas using a single brand and logo that agricultural producers hope will enhance Australia’s global reputation for high-quality food and reduce competing marketing campaigns.

Page 3: Tony Abbott revealed he wanted to cripple the renewable energy industry as Alinta Energy blamed a supply glut caused by the subsidised growth of wind and solar power as a reason for closing ageing coal-fired power stations in South Australia’s north.

Lifetime tax breaks on superannuation for the highest income earners would be reduced by a quarter and the part-pension abolished under a plan that would save the federal budget $59 billion a year by 2055.

Page 5: Weekly asking rents rose just 1.5 per cent in the year to May, the slowest pace on record, as an investor-driven increase in supply and falls in Perth, Darwin and Canberra pulled the national average lower.

Page 11: Leading retailers are split over the impact of soaring house prices but agree that the retail sector needs to become more customer-centric to survive increasing disruption from online and international competitors.

Page 13: TPG Telecom’s $1.56 billion takeover of iiNet may be delayed after the competition regulator said the merger could substantially lessen competition in the broadband market.

Page 16: German discounter Lidl has ‘‘no current plans’’ to enter Australia, even though it has been eyeing the local grocery market over the last 15 years.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: The Australian Workers Union has spent two years resisting attempts to abandon a workplace agreement struck during Bill Shorten’s reign at the union that it now admits disadvantages its members by slashing penalty rates.

Mining giant Rio Tinto has urged the federal government not to go it alone in fighting multinational tax avoidance, warning it could lead to companies being double-taxed and make doing business harder.

Page 2: Australia’s new giant unmanned aircraft may not be able to track terrorist movements in neighbouring countries because of a budget shortfall which could rob the drones of this special feature.

Page 3: The political fight over housing policy appears set to trigger a price rise before the next election as Labor considers raising $3 billion a year by toughening the tax rules on negative gearing.

Page 4: Australia’s jobless rate has fallen to a 12-month low of 6 per cent after a surprising 42,100 new jobs were created last month.

Page 8: Australia will face diplomatic pressure to increase its emissions reduction target towards 40 per cent below 2000 levels by 2030.

Page 21: BHP Billiton chief executive Andrew Mackenzie has declared the Olympic Dam expansion is “game on” but admits there are technical and manufacturing hurdles that must be worked out before final approval is given to the giant project.

Nine Entertainment chief executive David Gyngell told confidants in private meetings between late April and late May that the network was suffering severe advertising pressure and had a weak forecast.

Page 22: The closure of BlueScope Steel’s Port Kembla steelworks could boost earnings by leaving the company with a profitable Colorbond business in Australia, analysts say.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Plans to build a two-storey McDonald’s restaurant within 400m of Applecross Primary School have sparked community concerns that it will affect children’s health by fuelling the obesity epidemic and increasing traffic in suburban streets.

Page 6: Tens of thousands of minimum wage workers will get a 2.1 per cent pay rise but unions have criticised the State wage decision as effectively a pay cut.

Page 9: A security boss at Serco-run Acacia Prison was investigated by Australian Federal Police after it was discovered she had kept drugs thrown over the wall of the prison in her desk and then supplied them to prison dog handlers to train their animals.

Page 10: Total payments by taxpayers towards the Burswood stadium project are predicted to exceed $1.5 billion over the next 28 years.

Page 11: Weeds are growing from cracks in the facade, the timber door frames are blackened and construction workers keep finding old pennies among rubble, but the fire-ravaged Guildford Hotel finally has a new roof protecting it from the elements.

Page 14: Tony Abbott has declared himself anti-wind farm, saying they look awful, make too much noise and might even cause health problems.

Page 28: A western suburbs mayor wants the Barnett Government to redirect some Bigger Picture advertising spending to sell the importance of increased density in suburban Perth.

Business: Contractors flying workers to projects in areas classified as “non-remote” by the Australian Tax Office may benefit from a big fringe benefits tax win for John Holland in the Federal Court yesterday.

Regional Development Minister Terry Redman lashed out at banks yesterday at the launch of a blueprint for the future of the Wheatbelt.

 

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options