19/05/2021 - 07:01

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19/05/2021 - 07:01

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Juukan owners want to repair Rio ties

Traditional owners of Juukan Gorge say they are not opposed to mining and are committed to rebuilding their relationship with Rio Tinto, but say more work is required after last year’s destruction of the gorge’s prized cultural heritage. The Fin

Indonesia pushes to reopen maritime border talks

Woodside Energy, Santos and Japan’s INPEX could lose some rights to extract oil and gas as Indonesia pushes to reopen fractious maritime boundary negotiations with Australia for the first time in 24 years. The Fin

Travel, aviation and personal fitness workers drawn in by resources skills shortage

WA’s newest mining recruits have entered the booming sector from a range of different job backgrounds, capitalising on opportunities in an industry that is struggling with the impact of the skills shortage. The West

Super returns surge past Covid shock

Super funds are on track for their best annual return in close to a decade as markets straddle record highs, with the March 2020 meltdown now a distant memory. The Aus

Ruling adds to gig worker uncertainty

A Fair Work Commission ruling that a Deliveroo rider is an employee of the company rather than an independent contractor has added to uncertainty over the rights of gig economy workers in Australia, as it contradicts a full bench decision that Uber Eats drivers are not employees. The Fin

PM flags vaccine passport and home isolation plans

Australians fully vaccinated against COVID-19 will get vaccine passports to allow them to travel across state borders in the event of future closures as a first step under the federal government’s plans to restart international travel and end the nation’s isolation. The Fin

Beijing warns it will step up iron ore exploration

Beijing’s top economic planning body says China will step up domestic iron ore exploration and production, and widen channels for imports of the steel-making commodity as a top official accused Australia of disrupting bilateral trade. The Fin

Flight Centre boss backs Virgin chief’s call

Flight Centre CEO Graham “Skroo” Turner has backed Virgin Australia CEO Jayne Hrdlicka following her assessment that international borders needed to open even though some people may die. The Aus

Crackdown on shipping waste overseas could put more plastics in landfill

WA councils fear thousands of tonnes of recycling is at risk of ending up in landfill when a Federal Government ban preventing some Australian plastic from being sent overseas comes into effect in July. The West

Agrimin signs offtake deal with China

Agrimin has signed the biggest single binding offtake deal for sulphate of potash in the fledgling Australian sector’s short history. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Woodside Energy, Santos and Japan’s INPEX could lose some rights to extract oil and gas as Indonesia pushes to reopen fractious maritime boundary negotiations with Australia for the first time in 24 years.

Page 2: The Morrison government is ‘‘deliberately encouraging anxiety’’ about war with China for domestic political gain, Opposition foreign affairs spokeswoman Penny Wong will claim in a stinging denunciation of the Prime Minister’s handling of foreign policy.

Page 3: A Fair Work Commission ruling that a Deliveroo rider is an employee of the company rather than an independent contractor has added to uncertainty over the rights of gig economy workers in Australia, as it contradicts a full bench decision that Uber Eats drivers are not employees.

Australians fully vaccinated against COVID-19 will get vaccine passports to allow them to travel across state borders in the event of future closures as a first step under the federal government’s plans to restart international travel and end the nation’s isolation.

Page 4: The best antidote to soaring house prices is supply and, short of the states freeing up more land, the next best solution is a policy platform to encourage the construction of new homes, Scott Morrison says.

Page 11: There should be no new investment in coal or gas, while solar and wind projects would need to be increased by fourfold, for the world to reach net zero emissions by 2050, according to a report by the International Energy Agency.

Page 13: Beijing’s top economic planning body says China will step up domestic iron ore exploration and production, and widen channels for imports of the steel-making commodity as a top official accused Australia of disrupting bilateral trade.

Page 15: Woolworths’ hotels and liquor spin-off, Endeavour Group, could take a bigger share of the $14 billion poker machine market when Crown Resorts and The Star move to cashless gaming.

Page 17: Woolworths, Coles, Aldi and big food manufacturers have committed to making all plastic packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

Page 19: Traditional owners of Juukan Gorge say they are not opposed to mining and are committed to rebuilding their relationship with Rio Tinto, but say more work is required after last year’s destruction of the gorge’s prized cultural heritage.

Rio Tinto is negotiating a mine closure agreement with traditional owners that is set to include compensation for infrastructure that is left behind deep in the earth after 37 years of taking rare coloured diamonds out of the ground in Western Australia’s East Kimberley.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Treasury secretary Steven Kennedy says government spending will eventually need to be reined in to close a persistent gap of about $40bn between tax revenue and increased outlays on aged care, disabilities and welfare that will leave the budget in deficit for a decade.

Page 4: An entrenched focus on cost containment by businesses could lead to only a slow pick up in wages, the Reserve Bank says, despite reports of labour shortages amid the fastest 10 months of employment growth on record.

Page 5: Federal Labor has threatened to use the Coalition’s proposed superannuation changes to cancel investments in companies that engage in wage theft or have a poor industrial relations record if the government gets the new powers passed by parliament and the ALP wins the next election.

Bionic ear maker Cochlear has backed Josh Frydenberg’s “patent box’’ tax break for innovation, predicting it could create more highly paid jobs in Australia.

Page 13: Super funds are on track for their best annual return in close to a decade as markets straddle record highs, with the March 2020 meltdown now a distant memory.

Page 14: Brokers working on the initial public offering of Best & Less were believed to be working hard on Tuesday to gain commitments from equity investors after telling the market that the private equity-owned retailer planned to list with a $271.2m market value and sell shares at $2.15 each.

Page 15: Flight Centre CEO Graham “Skroo” Turner has backed Virgin Australia CEO Jayne Hrdlicka following her assessment that international borders needed to open even though some people may die.

Page 16: BHP is set to deliver the first ore from its $US3.6bn ($4.6bn) South Flank mine within days, according to chief executive Mike Henry, as iron ore prices jump back up after sharp falls last week despite fresh warnings from Chinese authorities that trade tensions could affect iron ore.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: The number of students penalised for flouting Year 12 exam rules trebled last year, with some losing up to 10 per cent of their mark for disobeying a new ban on wristwatches.

Page 5: Mark McGowan says he’s concerned by revelations about staff culture at Perth Children’s Hospital exposed in a report into the death of Aishwarya Aswath.

Page 6: Mark McGowan says growing COVID-19 outbreaks overseas shows there “is so much the world still doesn’t know about this killer virus”, as he backed Scott Morrison’s refusal to set a date for reopening Australia’s border.

Page 7: Only 0.42 per cent of the 302,000 West Australians vaccinated against COVID-19 over the past three months have experienced an adverse reaction, new figures show.

Page 10: The Australian Defence Force’s new Joint Strike Fighter has taken to the skies above the Northern Territory for the first large-scale air combat training exercise since the COVID pandemic hit.

Page 14: The High Court has ordered Clive Palmer to pay the WA Government’s costs over his abandoned contempt suit against Premier Mark McGowan and Attorney-General John Quigley.

Page 19: WA councils fear thousands of tonnes of recycling is at risk of ending up in landfill when a Federal Government ban preventing some Australian plastic from being sent overseas comes into effect in July.

Business: Australian-owned US sharetrading platform Stake has raised $40 million as the company looks to grow its services in new countries.

The minutes of the RBA’s May board meeting have stuck to the script of having to keep interest rates at ultra-low levels for several years, but were also a reminder of the circumstances needed to produce a hike.

Agrimin has signed the biggest single binding offtake deal for sulphate of potash in the fledgling Australian sector’s short history.

WA’s newest mining recruits have entered the booming sector from a range of different job backgrounds, capitalising on opportunities in an industry that is struggling with the impact of the skills shortage.

WA’s biggest pork producer has recorded a 50 per cent jump in profits, as the rebound in prices gathers momentum on the back of stronger domestic and international demand.

The Federal corporate watchdog has banned investment manager Robert Marie from the financial services game amid an ongoing investigation into the failed rentfor-life group Sterling First.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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