12/03/2021 - 06:53

Morning Headlines

12/03/2021 - 06:53

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.

Poll shows rookie leader set to lose seat in huge swing to Labor; BHP aims to make 30,000 mine contract workers employees; Woodside hires Morgan Stanley, Rothschild for Pluto selldown.

Morning Headlines

Poll shows rookie leader set to lose seat in huge swing to Labor

Zak Kirkup is set to be the first WA Liberal Party leader in 88 years to lose his parliamentary seat, according to an exclusive poll for The West Australian on the eve of the State election. The West

BHP aims to make 30,000 mine contract workers employees

BHP chief executive Mike Henry wants more than 30,000 of the contractors that staff the company’s mines to become permanent employees, and says the 50 per cent rally in nickel prices over the past year is only the beginning. The Fin

Woodside hires Morgan Stanley, Rothschild for Pluto selldown

Woodside Petroleum has kicked off talks with gas infrastructure owners and financial investors about buying a stake in its Pluto Train 2 development in Western Australia. The Fin

Tianqi says payment of debt would bring risk

Chinese lithium company Tianqi, which is set to pocket $1.9 billion from a WA selldown, claims it could be left financially vulnerable if forced to pay the $39 million it owes to a Perth engineering company. The West

Politics duds desperate businesses needing aid

A $1.2 billion tourism and aviation rescue plan that largely ignores WA is another blow to Perth businesses in the sector, who say they are “hanging on by our fingernails” and desperately need further government aid. The West

S&P warns on deficit risk to AAA

Any slippage in the Morrison government’s projected reining in of its budget deficit blowout could trigger the loss of Australia’s AAA sovereign credit rating, Standard & Poor’s has warned, injecting fresh urgency to the push to wind back its stimulus spending and tighten fiscal policy. The Fin

Multiple nations targeting our unis: ASIO boss

Up to nine countries’ intelligence services are trying to steal or cultivate sensitive research and technology from Australian universities and scientists, the nation’s spy chief has told a parliamentary inquiry. The Fin

Workplace experts called in to conduct survey of teachers at Perth Modern

Top-ranked WA school Perth Modern has had to call in external workplace consultants, Emergency Support Network, to conduct a confidential survey of teachers. The West

Startups hit the city for rental bargains

Cash conscious startups are migrating to the Perth CBD as commercial property rents decline, according to a report by PwC. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Fossil fuel power and renewable chief executives say they are unable to justify investing in the gas power and firming generation needed to help offset the closure of the Yallourn plant in Victoria in 2028 unless electricity market rules are changed such as by paying them to provide back-up power.

Any slippage in the Morrison government’s projected reining in of its budget deficit blowout could trigger the loss of Australia’s AAA sovereign credit rating, Standard & Poor’s has warned, injecting fresh urgency to the push to wind back its stimulus spending and tighten fiscal policy.

Page 3: The Morrison government will consider a raft of changes to encourage farmers to squirrel money away in tax-minimising bank accounts already holding $5.3 billion.

Page 4: The offer to subsidise 800,000 airfares in a bid to buttress the international tourism sector should stop the states from closing their borders in the event of a coronavirus outbreak, the federal government said.

Page 12: Up to nine countries’ intelligence services are trying to steal or cultivate sensitive research and technology from Australian universities and scientists, the nation’s spy chief has told a parliamentary inquiry.

Page 13: The West Australian Liberal Party has attacked the McGowan government’s much-hyped economic management in a last-ditch bid to save seats in the state election tomorrow, but the tactic may backfire.

Page 16: Greensill Capital’s Australian administrators will try to recover hundreds of millions of dollars for its family-owned parent group in Queensland from the firm’s insolvent UK operating businesses as they prepare for their first creditors meeting next week.

Page 17: Woodside Petroleum has kicked off talks with gas infrastructure owners and financial investors about buying a stake in its Pluto Train 2 development in Western Australia.

Page 19: BHP chief executive Mike Henry wants more than 30,000 of the contractors that staff the company’s mines to become permanent employees, and says the 50 per cent rally in nickel prices over the past year is only the beginning.

Page 20: The banks have told a parliamentary intelligence committee that the Department of Home Affairs should not reinvent the wheel when it comes to mandating tougher cyber security standards on banks because the prudential regulator is already all over the area.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: A 3.1 million dose shortfall in vaccine supplies and a revolt from doctors over inoculation payments threatens to push the completion of the nation’s COVID-19 immunisation program into the early part of next year.

Page 4: Struggling businesses in Australia’s CBDs have emerged as the biggest losers in the Morrison government’s targeted support package, with warnings that the end of JobKeeper will trigger a new round of retrenchments in hotel and accommodation staff.

A large majority of Australian chief executives have expressed faith that the economy will be stronger this year, with a near consensus emerging that cyber attacks pose the greatest risk to growing their businesses, a survey from PwC has revealed.

Page 6: WA’s embattled Liberal Party has come under renewed fire after its Treasury spokesman struggled to answer basic questions about the costs of its controversial election promises.

Page 9: Labor frontbencher Katy Gallagher has called for an overhaul of the way federal parliament sits and a move towards a more flexible workplace, saying scrutiny of how MPs and staffers do business should form part of an independent review into the culture.

Page 15: Heinemann Australia chief executive Richard Goodman knows he is going to have to make some hard choices in the next weeks, laying off even more of his staff when the JobKeeper allowance goes at the end of the month.

Page 19: Australian clinical research firm Novotech is set to become one of the most successful investments for global private equity giant TPG in Asia, highlighting the opportunity to take local biotech expertise to the world.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Federal Education Minister Alan Tudge has revealed school students will be taught about consent and respectful relationships in an overhaul of Australia’s sex education curriculum.

Page 4: Zak Kirkup is set to be the first WA Liberal Party leader in 88 years to lose his parliamentary seat, according to an exclusive poll for The West Australian on the eve of the State election.

Page 7: Labor has promised to introduce a new public holiday if re-elected to government.

Page 11: Doubts every Australian will be fully vaccinated by the end of October have sparked major concerns among health experts and business groups urging the Federal Government to get on with the rollout.

Page 18: Top-ranked WA school Perth Modern has had to call in external workplace consultants, Emergency Support Network, to conduct a confidential survey of teachers.

Business: Chinese lithium company Tianqi, which is set to pocket $1.9 billion from a WA selldown, claims it could be left financially vulnerable if forced to pay the $39 million it owes to a Perth engineering company.

Spudshed owner Tony Galati wants to open four stores in regional WA within two years, but says the move hinges on a more stable economy and finding enough workers.

A $1.2 billion tourism and aviation rescue plan that largely ignores WA is another blow to Perth businesses in the sector, who say they are “hanging on by our fingernails” and desperately need further government aid.

Scott Morrison is vowing to take on multinational car manufacturing companies — who he says are “riding roughshod” over local Australian car dealers — with new multimillion-dollar fines for wrongdoing.

Cash conscious startups are migrating to the Perth CBD as commercial property rents decline, according to a report by PwC.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options