26/02/2021 - 07:04

Morning Headlines

26/02/2021 - 07:04

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Morning Headlines

Iluka catches global attention with rare earths plans

Iluka Resources is in talks with a number of overseas governments seeking non-Chinese supply of rare earths as it pushes ahead with plans to become the only fully integrated supplier on Australian soil. The Fin

I will lead opposition: WA Nat

The leader of the West Australian Nationals says she is ready to lead the opposition if her party catapults past the Liberals at the state election in just over two weeks. The Aus

WA probes heritage bungle

An official investigation is under way into whether Fortescue Metals Group breached Western Australia’s Aboriginal Heritage Act when it cleared a sensitive site at Weelamurra Creek earlier this month. The Fin

WA ahead but faces hard year

Maintaining the State’s economic strength will be a challenge this year, experts predict, after a report revealed WA and NSW are the only economies performing above trend and accelerating. The West

Aviation stimulus support tops $1bn

Australia’s aviation industry will have received more than $1bn in coronavirus subsidies by the end of the JobKeeper scheme next month as airlines struggle amid continued international border closures and restrictions on interstate travel. The Aus

China ports block Australian wine

Chinese ports turned away more than 23,000 litres of Australian wine due to labelling issues last month, as China signalled it would not back down on its trade impasse with Australia. The Fin

Uni grants ‘if research sells well’

Future government grants to universities could be tied to boosting the commercialisation of research, as institutions are urged to change their business models away from an over-reliance on international student revenue to refocus on educating Australians. The Aus

Qantas plots bold escape from virus

Qantas plans to restart most international flights by the end of October and return 80 per cent of its pre-pandemic domestic flights to the sky by the end of the financial year, but chief executive Alan Joyce has warned it will not be enough to swing the wounded carrier back to profitability.

Nuclear friends find their voice

The co-chairs of a new bipartisan parliamentary group promoting nuclear industries will target Labor MPs and try to convince the opposition of the economic and scientific benefits of embracing nuclear energy. The Aus

Australian journalism back on Facebook today

Australian news content returns to Facebook today less than 24 hours after the Government’s world-first legislation which forces tech companies to pay for journalism officially became law. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Upstart payments business Afterpay will take advantage of surging spending by long-time users and a fast-rising user base in the US to take on big banks in the everyday banking market and prepare itself for a Wall Street listing.

Page 3: Brisbane has all but secured the Olympic victory it first tried for 29 years ago, but that goal will now trigger open debate about the infrastructure southeast Queensland needs to host the global tournament.

An official investigation is under way into whether Fortescue Metals Group breached Western Australia’s Aboriginal Heritage Act when it cleared a sensitive site at Weelamurra Creek earlier this month.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg says retirees must be encouraged to draw down their superannuation savings ‘‘more effectively’’, but he is yet to decide whether to limit the capacity to save for retirement by capping the superannuation guarantee.

Page 11: Local industries Australia relied on during the coronavirus pandemic, such as healthcare and manufacturing, were under threat from overseas digital competition, analysts have said.

Page 13: Beijing’s dispute with Australia appears to have reached a new low, with education agents based in China given a directive not to send students to Australia.

The fashion media landscape is set for a remarkable shift after Australian-Chinese blogger and influencer Margaret Zhang was yesterday appointed editor-in-chief of Vogue China.

Page 14: Labor has left the door open to going to the next election without committing to a specific increase in JobSeeker despite saying it would do so.

Page 16: Chinese ports turned away more than 23,000 litres of Australian wine due to labelling issues last month, as China signalled it would not back down on its trade impasse with Australia.

Facebook banned accounts for the military of Myanmar and its related media entities on Wednesday night (yesterday AEDT), citing its ‘‘history of exceptionally severe human rights abuses’’ and potential to use social media to pursue new rounds of violence following a coup this month.

Page 19: Qantas plans to restart most international flights by the end of October and return 80 per cent of its pre-pandemic domestic flights to the sky by the end of the financial year, but chief executive Alan Joyce has warned it will not be enough to swing the wounded carrier back to profitability.

Virus-battered travel giant Flight Centre says it is aiming to break even some time this year – if domestic borders open permanently and some low-risk international corridors are unlocked.

Page 21: Zip Co co-founder Peter Gray said the listing of Affirm on the Nasdaq in January is supporting Zip’s rising valuation, as offshore investors hone in on its improving capital efficiency given the acquisition of Quadpay is letting Zip recycle capital faster.

Iluka Resources is in talks with a number of overseas governments seeking non-Chinese supply of rare earths as it pushes ahead with plans to become the only fully integrated supplier on Australian soil.

Page 24: TPG Telecom has swung to an after-tax profit of $734 million in its first full-year result since merging with Vodafone Hutchinson Australia, thanks largely to a one-off tax credit that lifted the bottom line into the black.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Future government grants to universities could be tied to boosting the commercialisation of research, as institutions are urged to change their business models away from an over-reliance on international student revenue to refocus on educating Australians.

The leader of the West Australian Nationals says she is ready to lead the opposition if her party catapults past the Liberals at the state election in just over two weeks.

Page 4: Japan’s new ambassador has praised the Morrison government’s strategic approach to the South China Sea and declared expanding Australian-Japanese security co-operation was important because of concerns about “reckless behaviour” towards Taiwan.

The co-chairs of a new bipartisan parliamentary group promoting nuclear industries will target Labor MPs and try to convince the opposition of the economic and scientific benefits of embracing nuclear energy.

Page 5: Australia’s aviation industry will have received more than $1bn in coronavirus subsidies by the end of the JobKeeper scheme next month as airlines struggle amid continued international border closures and restrictions on interstate travel.

Page 6: West Australian Labor premier Mark McGowan has responded to calls for his government to ban political donations from property developers by promising more transparency.

Page 15: Qantas has pinned its hopes on the COVID-19 vaccine to return the airline to profit, after sinking to a $1.47bn statutory loss in the first half of the 2021 financial year.

Page 17: The uncertainty of future lockdowns in Australia caused by COVID-19 will cloud the outlook for David Jones but the South African owner of the nation’s upmarket department store “has come through a painful process” to improve the businesses’s profitability, Woolworths Holdings chief executive Roy Bagattini says.

Page 19: Personal lender SocietyOne has tapped stockbrokers Morgans and Evans and Partners for a potential 2021 ASX listing, joining a string of other lending groups that are mulling a run at the local bourse.

Page 20: Australia Post delivered a cracking first-half result, with revenue growth of 15.5 per cent year on year to $4.3bn powered by a parcel business gone berserk.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 6: After pushing Mark McGowan to have five debates, Liberal leader Zak Kirkup barely landed a blow during his one and only prime-time opportunity to convince teetering conservative voters to stick with his party.

Page 9: Australian news content returns to Facebook today less than 24 hours after the Government’s world-first legislation which forces tech companies to pay for journalism officially became law.

Page 16: Breast cancer patients given a common beta-blocker at the time of diagnosis are almost twice as likely to be alive five years later.

Page 22: Five WA infrastructure projects have been listed as national priorities in a $59 billion pipeline to bolster economic recovery after COVID-19.

Page 23: A town in WA’s Mid West had one of the highest rates of JobKeeper dependency in the country at the peak of the pandemic, with about two-thirds of the businesses in Shark Bay relying on the Government payment that is due to expire next month.

Business: Maintaining the State’s economic strength will be a challenge this year, experts predict, after a report revealed WA and NSW are the only economies performing above trend and accelerating.

Mining lobby groups are at odds over a respected survey which showed WA slipping down the rankings as an attractive mining jurisdiction.

One of WA’s biggest and most highly regarded cattle stations is being sold by its Chinese billionaire owner, who will refocus efforts on building his Great Southern wine business.

Grain growers controlling Australia’s biggest co-operative have voted against improvements to its governance structure, which would have led to the biggest board shakeup in its 88-year history.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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