26/11/2020 - 06:42

Morning Headlines

26/11/2020 - 06:42

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Morning Headlines

Leading CEOs form climate change club

The CEOs of 22 of Australia’s biggest companies, including BHP, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, AGL, Rio Tinto and Wesfarmers, have joined forces to find ways to reduce emissions in line with the Paris Agreement. The Fin

ABC, SBS may get Google cash for news

New legislation to force Google and Facebook to pay for the value of Australian journalism on their platforms looks to have secured a smoother ride, with vital backing in the Senate more likely due to the inclusion of the ABC and SBS, a measure supported by the largest commercial media companies in Australia. The Fin

Quarantine, vaccine or no entry, says PM

People who refuse to be vaccinated against coronavirus must spend two weeks in quarantine, or be immunised on the spot, before being allowed into the country, under plans being considered by the Morrison government for when international travel resumes. The Fin

Pay rise for young retail workers

Thousands of young retail workers will have their pay increased by between $86 and $172 a week after a Fair Work Commission decision that has been slammed by employers as “out of touch” with the economic conditions facing businesses emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic. The Aus

Super funds ban on ads, lobby fees

Tens of millions of dollars spent by superannuation funds on advertising and political lobbying could be outlawed under the Morrison government’s crackdown forcing trustees to act in the financial interests of retirement savers. The Fin

Covid aid saved 500,000 families

Almost half a million Australian households have been spared the risk of losing their homes or being forced into housing stress because of JobKeeper, JobSeeker and Coronavirus Supplement payments, economic research has found. The Aus

Rebel IOOF shareholders rattle board

IOOF chief executive Renato Mota has defended the wealth giant’s $1.4 billion takeover of National Australia Bank’s MLC and languishing share price after the company survived a protest vote against the re-election of two board directors. The Fin

Gold to rebound hard: Beament

Northern Star Resources boss Bill Beament says the gold price will rebound ‘‘very, very hard’’ as the financial realities of the recovery from COVID-19 start to bite. The Fin

After nearly 20 years, brewer reveals a change of Gage

Gage Roads Brewing has retired its almost two decade-old company name as part of an ambitious strategy to establish itself as a national brewer and build its stable of brands on the eastern seaboard. The West

Emirates set for recovery

Emirates sees a sharp recovery in demand for air travel next year as coronavirus vaccines are distributed around the world, meaning the carrier’s full fleet of jumbo Airbus SE A380 jets could return to the skies by early 2022. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Tens of millions of dollars spent by superannuation funds on advertising and political lobbying could be outlawed under the Morrison government’s crackdown forcing trustees to act in the financial interests of retirement savers.

Page 3: People who refuse to be vaccinated against coronavirus must spend two weeks in quarantine, or be immunised on the spot, before being allowed into the country, under plans being considered by the Morrison government for when international travel resumes.

Uber is set to decide whether to roll out a trial in Australia to let drivers bid for rides and set their own prices – which would cement their status as independent contractors.

Page 5: Fears are rising that business leaders will pay less attention to gender pay equality as they battle to recover from the coronavirus pandemic after an official survey found there was a significant fall in the number of companies that took action to close the gap in 2020.

Page 9: Australia’s corporate law firms have come out of the COVID-19 pandemic richer, with almost 80 per cent recording stable or rising profits compared to the previous year, and an average profit increase of 7 per cent across the sector.

Page 10: New legislation to force Google and Facebook to pay for the value of Australian journalism on their platforms looks to have secured a smoother ride, with vital backing in the Senate more likely due to the inclusion of the ABC and SBS, a measure supported by the largest commercial media companies in Australia.

Page 12: The worldwide airline industry will rack up more than $200 billion of losses this year and next, before finally regaining cash-positive altitude at the end of 2021, the International Air Transport Association has forecast.

Page 15: IOOF chief executive Renato Mota has defended the wealth giant’s $1.4 billion takeover of National Australia Bank’s MLC and languishing share price after the company survived a protest vote against the re-election of two board directors.

Page 17: The CEOs of 22 of Australia’s biggest companies, including BHP, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, AGL, Rio Tinto and Wesfarmers, have joined forces to find ways to reduce emissions in line with the Paris Agreement.

Page 20: Big energy companies and users are sceptical about new mechanisms being proposed by the Energy Security Board to ensure there is enough ‘‘firming’’ generation in the electricity grid and wary of potential costs for energy users.

Page 21: Northern Star Resources boss Bill Beament says the gold price will rebound ‘‘very, very hard’’ as the financial realities of the recovery from COVID-19 start to bite.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Almost half a million Australian households have been spared the risk of losing their homes or being forced into housing stress because of JobKeeper, JobSeeker and Coronavirus Supplement payments, economic research has found.

Page 2: Australia’s top diplomat has urged China to act constructively in its global relationships, saying Beijing is mistaken if it thinks that it can set the terms of its engagement with the world.

Page 3: Qantas has hatched a plan to lure other airlines’ most loyal passengers across to its frequent flyer scheme, with an offer to “fast track” their status to gold, on the condition they earn 100 status credits within three months.

Page 4: Thousands of young retail workers will have their pay increased by between $86 and $172 a week after a Fair Work Commission decision that has been slammed by employers as “out of touch” with the economic conditions facing businesses emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Page 5: West Australian Premier Mark McGowan is refusing to guarantee he will drop quarantine requirements for arrivals from Victoria and NSW, despite both states sitting on the cusp of reaching WA’s key COVID thresholds.

Page 8: Political leaders across Europe are desperately trying to “save Christmas’’, with lockdowns to be temporarily eased during the festive period.

Page 13: Commonwealth Bank wants to have a merger between mortgage broking group Aussie Home Loans and online firm Lendi agreed before Christmas, and is putting the final touches on a deal, according to sources.

Australian coal worth $700m is stuck in more than 50 ships off Chinese ports, deepening a crisis for one of the nation’s most valuable export earners and damaging delicate trade tensions with Australia’s largest trade partner.

Page 15: Harvey Norman chairman Gerry Harvey believes the retailer is in the midst of “near boom conditions” after its earnings more than doubled between July and November, with Australians returning from overseas cashed up and looking to spend on housing and products to fill them.

Page 17: Household income growth has not slowed since the government began reducing the JobKeeper and JobSeeker payments in September.

  

 

The West Australian

Page 3: The State Government will renew a national campaign today to convince the country that WA should win a multibillion-dollar submarine maintenance contract.

Page 4: The US is no longer “a single global superpower” and “cannot be expected to lead in the way it once did”, according to Australia’s top diplomat.

Page 7: WA looks set to be the last State to fully open its border to Victoria, as compulsory contact registers will next week be reintroduced for a host of businesses and venues.

Page 9: Northern Star Resources executive chairman Bill Beament has revealed how close WA’s resources sector came to being shut down early in the COVID-19 crisis.

Page 16: The former boss of WA’s corruption watchdog, John McKechnie, has accused the Liberal Party of a “decapitation” of the agency and allowing it to “flounder without a permanent head”.

Page 20: The ABC’s Perth breakfast duo is being split up to do their own shows back-to-back as the national broadcaster tries to revive flagging ratings in a move that will also see it axe the one-hour Focus program.

Page 21: Three-quarters of employers now offer flexible hours in a work-life “industrial revolution” to help more Australians juggle work and family life — but men still pocket a “blokes’ bonus’’ in terms of pay.

Business: Adventure retailer Kathmandu says COVID-19 cost it about $NZ135 million ($128.1m) in sales this year as the sector was smashed by lockdowns and restrictions on international and domestic travel.

Australia’s consumer law watchdog says travel issues have topped the list for reported complaints during the coronavirus pandemic.

Gage Roads Brewing has retired its almost two decade-old company name as part of an ambitious strategy to establish itself as a national brewer and build its stable of brands on the eastern seaboard.

WA business owners are busting the myth that women leave traditional 9-to-5 roles to start their own venture for “lifestyle reasons”.

Emirates sees a sharp recovery in demand for air travel next year as coronavirus vaccines are distributed around the world, meaning the carrier’s full fleet of jumbo Airbus SE A380 jets could return to the skies by early 2022.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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