16/11/2020 - 06:54

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16/11/2020 - 06:54

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Taxpayers, CSL to build vaccine plant

The Morrison government will spend $1 billion over a decade to underwrite the construction of a new vaccine production facility to guarantee the nation continues to have its own supply of flu shots, antivenins and, if another pandemic occurs, the sovereign capability to look after its own citizens first. The Fin

Cash flows plus a world-class partner: IGO spruiks Tropicana

Battery metals play IGO Ltd has wasted no time in readying its 30 per cent stake in the Tropicana Gold Mine for sale. The Fin

SA outbreak creates havoc for border freedoms

WA’s new “controlled border” was urgently tightened yesterday after an outbreak of COVID-19 cases in South Australia threatened the move to relax restrictions. The West

Investigator in charge at $1.3bn land council

A forensic investigator has taken control of a West Australian land council as it clings to hopes it can right itself in time to help deliver the nation’s biggest Native Settlement, a $1.3bn land and cash deal between the state government and 30,000 Noongar people of the southwest. The Aus

Australia hedges bets beyond China in world’s largest trade deal

Efforts to diversify Australia’s trade relationship away from China have received a major boost with the signing of the world’s largest free trade agreement between 15 Asia-Pacific nations. The Fin

Legal challenge to compulsory vaccine

Employers’ power to require staff to vaccinate against infectious diseases will be tested for the first time just as the Morrison government looks to roll out a coronavirus vaccine. The Fin

Cashed-up Ibaera Capital launches next fund

Perth-based private equity firm Ibaera Capital is primed for deals in the WA exploration sector as it completes a $US250 million ($343m) raising from international investors, marking the second fund in its eight-year history. The West

Chinese students keenest on Australia

The number of Chinese students hoping to study in Australia has gone up relative to the number of students applying from the rest of the world, according to the Mitchell Institute, pointing to a dilemma for universities and government. The Fin

Digital code to be law this year

The long-awaited media bargaining code that would force tech giants to pay news publishers for their content will become law within the next four weeks. The Aus

Caution on short term virus stock

WA brokers and fund managers are urging caution on the back of excitement about a coronavirus vaccine, advising people to trust long-term investment strategies after travel and transport stocks surged. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The Morrison government will spend $1 billion over a decade to underwrite the construction of a new vaccine production facility to guarantee the nation continues to have its own supply of flu shots, antivenins and, if another pandemic occurs, the sovereign capability to look after its own citizens first.

Efforts to diversify Australia’s trade relationship away from China have received a major boost with the signing of the world’s largest free trade agreement between 15 Asia-Pacific nations.

Page 3: The federal government is considering relaxing personal bankruptcy laws to reduce the three-year ‘‘exclusion period’’ for individuals declared bankrupt to as low as one year, to help financially stricken people and small businesses get back on their feet faster following the recession.

Two Australian companies have secured a $US1 billion ($1.3 billion) deal to build and operate 650 healthcare clinics and 23 hospitals across Indonesia’s most populace province.

Page 4: KPMG’s own lawyer told the firm that partners’ awareness of its mandatory retirement age of 58 before they joined was not a defence against the provision being discriminatory.

Page 5: Employers’ power to require staff to vaccinate against infectious diseases will be tested for the first time just as the Morrison government looks to roll out a coronavirus vaccine.

Page 8: Web designers, digital marketers and IT security specialists have emerged as some of the big winners out of the coronavirus pandemic and were able to command hefty pay rises as companies were forced to invest in digital roles.

Page 13: The former head of Donald Trump’s manufacturing taskforce, Australian Andrew Liveris, believes most business leaders are happy to trade the instability of the President’s administration for Joe Biden, even if it hurts them in the short term through tax increases or regulations.

Page 15: The number of Chinese students hoping to study in Australia has gone up relative to the number of students applying from the rest of the world, according to the Mitchell Institute, pointing to a dilemma for universities and government.

Page 16: Axel Weber, the global chairman of UBS Group and former president of Germany’s central bank, warns markets need to prepare for several difficult years of pandemic recovery, with economic uncertainty to be compounded with even greater political polarisation and more surprises likely in the coming months and years.

Page 17: Battery metals play IGO Ltd has wasted no time in readying its 30 per cent stake in the Tropicana Gold Mine for sale.

Page 19: The sluggish development of end-uses for hydrogen looms as the biggest obstacle to achieving ambitious goals for Australia in production and export, says outgoing Chief Scientist Alan Finkel, adding the fuel is critical to reaching the goal of an ‘‘electric planet’’.

Page 22: National Olympic broadcaster Seven is counting on a sentiment boost from vaccine hopes as well as from the organisers’ confidence that the Tokyo Games will go ahead to make up for the revenue it lost – about one-fifth in total – from pandemic-hit sponsors unable to continue their financial support of next year’s Games broadcasts.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: The board of Nine Entertainment has split over chief executive Hugh Marks’s sexual relationship with a subordinate, leaving the media giant reeling in an apparent clash of cultures between the merged company’s broadcast and print divisions.

Page 2: Australia and Japan will ramp up joint military operations, including patrols near disputed islands in the South and East China Sea, under a new defence pact to be progressed by Scott Morrison and his Japanese counterpart Yoshihide Suga this week.

Page 3: The same Chinese-language We-Chat group using the “power of the masses” to co-ordinate complaints against academics in a bid to overturn failed grades is behind campaigns against lecturers and researchers critical of Beijing.

Page 4: Passengers on a Sunday flight from Adelaide to Perth were shocked to be told they had to go into two weeks’ quarantine on arrival, despite the West Australian government only hours earlier assuring South Australians they could enter the state without having to isolate.

Page 5: A forensic investigator has taken control of a West Australian land council as it clings to hopes it can right itself in time to help deliver the nation’s biggest Native Settlement, a $1.3bn land and cash deal between the state government and 30,000 Noongar people of the southwest.

Page 13: The Morrison government’s plan for a gas-led economic recovery has been questioned by experts who claim the move will not lower prices or create manufacturing jobs.

Page 16: Two of the country’s most powerful proxy advisers have recommended that Village Roadshow shareholders vote for a takeover proposal from private equity house BGH Capital valuing the company at about $450m.

Page 19: The long-awaited media bargaining code that would force tech giants to pay news publishers for their content will become law within the next four weeks.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: WA’s new “controlled border” was urgently tightened yesterday after an outbreak of COVID-19 cases in South Australia threatened the move to relax restrictions.

Page 6: Two-thirds of West Australians fear there will be a COVID-19 outbreak in WA as a result of the State’s relaxed border restrictions, which came into effect at the weekend.

Page 11: Aussies dreaming of a Bali holiday when travel restrictions are eased may have to think again because of a proposed booze ban where sipping on the island’s famous Bintang beer could result in being thrown in jail.

Page 16: Students at regional universities are more likely to land a job than graduates from prestigious “sandstone’’ institutions.

Business: WA brokers and fund managers are urging caution on the back of excitement about a coronavirus vaccine, advising people to trust long-term investment strategies after travel and transport stocks surged.

Perth-based private equity firm Ibaera Capital is primed for deals in the WA exploration sector as it completes a $US250 million ($343m) raising from international investors, marking the second fund in its eight-year history.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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