12/10/2020 - 06:54

Morning Headlines

12/10/2020 - 06:54

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Capex tax break could be widened.

Capex tax break could be widened

Tax breaks for business investment could be extended to more companies after federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg asked Treasury and the Business Council of Australia to discuss ways to include larger companies that do not now qualify. The Fin

Uni students prefer online learning: study

As debate rages over the benefits of working online versus working from the office, a survey of postgraduate university students found that more than three-quarters who have studied at home during the pandemic think digital learning is equal to or better than face-to-face learning. The Fin

Industry on a high as Diggers & Dealers conference kicks off in Kalgoorlie

The biggest gold merger in a generation, rampant gold and iron ore prices, growing interest in base metals as the world looks to emerge from the coronavirus crisis and an incredible run of exploration success make for a heady backdrop to the annual Diggers & Dealers conference, which kicks off in Kalgoorlie on Monday. The Aus

New rules to lift border

Bringing down WA’s hard border may mean businesses are slapped with a fresh round of coronavirus restrictions as a precautionary safeguard designed to contain any potential outbreak, Mark McGowan says. The West

Mining cash surge leaves state exposed

Western Australia’s reliance on iron ore has reached an unprecedented level, with more than one in every four dollars of revenue collected by the state now coming from royalties. The Aus

More nations in line for travel bubble

Pacific island nations, South Korea, Japan and Singapore could be added to Australia’s coronavirus travel bubble plans, Scott Morrison said yesterday. The Fin

Pressure to extend wage plan to all ages

Scott Morrison’s $4bn wage subsidy scheme for new employees aged up to 35 could be derailed in the Senate by Labor, crossbenchers and the Greens, with the government staring down pressure to extend its JobMaker hiring credits program to all workers. The Aus

Toll pushing online with ‘dark stores’

Toll will invest in e-commerce delivery services and so-called ‘‘dark stores’’ so the logistics group can compete harder against DHL Express and Australia Post as online shopping booms, chief executive Thomas Knudsen says. The Fin

Gen Z base a mixed blessing for Afterpay

Homegrown fintech juggernaut Afterpay is the most recession-proof of the world’s three leading buy now, pay later pioneers, but its niche focus on younger consumers may make it susceptible to challenge, says the former US boss of rival Klarna. The Fin

Fat cats cash in on jobs fund

Jobseekers are caught up in a “broken system” where job agencies are tipped to pocket an extra $700 million out of government pandemic payments and people are still struggling to find work. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Tax breaks for business investment could be extended to more companies after federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg asked Treasury and the Business Council of Australia to discuss ways to include larger companies that do not now qualify.

Page 3: As debate rages over the benefits of working online versus working from the office, a survey of postgraduate university students found that more than three-quarters who have studied at home during the pandemic think digital learning is equal to or better than face-to-face learning.

Page 6: Labor says the government’s latest measures to weed out dud superannuation funds represent ineffective half measures that will not improve protections and could even send workers backwards.

Pacific island nations, South Korea, Japan and Singapore could be added to Australia’s coronavirus travel bubble plans, Scott Morrison said yesterday.

Page 12: The COVID-19 second wave now engulfing Europe is likely to douse an already slowing economic recovery, economists have warned.

Page 14: Universities have less than a year to come up with a new way to fund research before the budget’s $1 billion ‘‘sugar hit’’ runs out, a leading university research specialist says.

Page 15: Cleanaway Waste Management’s self-professed ‘‘zero harm’’ safety philosophy has been called into question by the NSW government’s Environmental Protection Agency, which has blasted the company over concerns about its ‘‘management of its operations’’ and the approach and knowledge of employees about environmental safety.

Page 17: Toll will invest in e-commerce delivery services and so-called ‘‘dark stores’’ so the logistics group can compete harder against DHL Express and Australia Post as online shopping booms, chief executive Thomas Knudsen says.

Page 18: Homegrown fintech juggernaut Afterpay is the most recession-proof of the world’s three leading buy now, pay later pioneers, but its niche focus on younger consumers may make it susceptible to challenge, says the former US boss of rival Klarna.

Page 19: This month’s quarterly reports are set to expose the trough for LNG contract prices for ASX-listed exporters in a delayed response to the collapse in crude oil earlier this year, but the impact should be softened by a recovery in spot prices that has taken some by surprise.

Page 30: Australians have doubled their time listening to podcasts this year, with lockdown woes, social media fatigue and a surge in new quality content driving increased demand.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Four in five voters have backed the Morrison government’s income tax cuts, claiming they will be better off, with a majority of Australians believing the budget stimulus will drag the economy out of COVID-19 recession.

Page 5: Bank notes, mobile phones, ATMs and supermarket self checkouts can carry the COVID-19 virus for at least 28 days, according to new CSIRO research that will intensify the drive to a cashless economy.

Page 6: Scott Morrison’s $4bn wage subsidy scheme for new employees aged up to 35 could be derailed in the Senate by Labor, crossbenchers and the Greens, with the government staring down pressure to extend its JobMaker hiring credits program to all workers.

Page 7: Western Australia’s reliance on iron ore has reached an unprecedented level, with more than one in every four dollars of revenue collected by the state now coming from royalties.

Page 7: Furniture retailer Koala, a major local success story valued at $500m, will move production of mattresses to China despite manufacturing becoming a focus in last week’s federal budget.

Page 13: AMP’s beleaguered board wants to provide a shareholder update on the potential sale of all or parts of the 171-year-old wealth group before the year’s end, as several investors ramp up pressure for a break-up of the company.

Page 15: Telstra says its 5G network now covers more than 40 per cent of the Australian population, as phone buyers across the country await the expected announcement of a 5G iPhone this week.

Page 16: The biggest gold merger in a generation, rampant gold and iron ore prices, growing interest in base metals as the world looks to emerge from the coronavirus crisis and an incredible run of exploration success make for a heady backdrop to the annual Diggers & Dealers conference, which kicks off in Kalgoorlie on Monday.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: A BHP-chartered cargo ship carrying millions of dollars of iron ore is languishing off Port Hedland after a crew member tested positive for coronavirus.

Page 9: Shoppers need to make online purchases before the end of November to ensure gifts they intend to send to a loved one arrive in time for Christmas Day.

Page 10: Bringing down WA’s hard border may mean businesses are slapped with a fresh round of coronavirus restrictions as a precautionary safeguard designed to contain any potential outbreak, Mark McGowan says.

Page 12: Parents have been warned to carefully vet anyone they allow to interact with their kids after an investigation uncovered scores of advertisements for tutoring and babysitting services from people who did not have Working With Children cards.

Page 14: Social media giants could be forced to remove harmful online abuse against Australians within 24 hours from next year after a proposed, world-first “takedown scheme” received millions of dollars in funding.

Business: The new owners of the Kalgoorlie Super Pit have secured environmental approval for a $600 million expansion of the mine that is expected to create 700 jobs.

Small business owners are afraid to hire staff amid COVID-19 uncertainty and confusing industry awards many view as stacked against them.

Jobseekers are caught up in a “broken system” where job agencies are tipped to pocket an extra $700 million out of government pandemic payments and people are still struggling to find work.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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