08/10/2020 - 06:57

Morning Headlines

08/10/2020 - 06:57

Bookmark

Save articles for future reference.

What employees really think about working from home.

What employees really think about working from home

The shift to the home office may have led to longer workdays and more work, but workers are much happier and three in four are annoyed it took a pandemic for bosses to finally embrace remote work. The Fin

Proof we are in a world of our own

WA dodged a COVID-19 recession and boasts a stronger economy than anywhere in the nation and potentially the planet, Ben Wyatt declared ahead of delivering his fourth State Budget. The West

Backing for $1.7trn debt budget

Labor is poised to usher through Parliament legislation for almost $50 billion in business and personal tax relief while unveiling significant spending proposals of its own, arguing the Coalition can no longer moralise over debt and deficit. The Fin

Fast-food, retail giants reap wage subsidy rewards

Supermarket and fast-food giants could be the biggest beneficiaries of the government’s new wage subsidy for young people, with the hiring credits potentially reducing their wage liabilities for teenage workers by two-thirds. The Fin

Industry funds not so keen on ‘stapling’ plan

The government’s proposal for workers to carry their super with them when they change jobs is a threat to the workplace default system, industry superannuation funds say. The Fin

‘Open your borders and purse strings’

Fresh from unveiling the biggest spending budget in living memory, Josh Frydenberg has said his government is prepared to do still more to support the economic recovery should it falter, as he doubled down on his push for the states to carry their fair share of the fiscal burden and urged them to reopen their borders. The Aus

Research secured, now for overseas students

Universities have ‘‘bought themselves time’’ with $1 billion in extra money for research in Tuesday’s budget, but the big challenge now is international enrolments, with Treasurer Josh Frydenberg warning travel for overseas students will be ‘‘closed off until late next year’’. The Fin

KKR moves on Westpac’s assets

Private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts is believed to be making early advances at Westpac’s wealth assets that are soon expected to hit the market. The Aus

Cashless welfare fix

The cashless welfare card will be changed so the purchase of alcohol and gambling items are automatically blocked by EFTPOS. It will also be redesigned to make it indistinguishable from other debit cards. The West

Fears staffing will still be a problem, despite incentives

WA employers say the “devil is in the detail” in the Federal Budget, which is banking $35 billion on businesses to generate jobs, boost investment and kickstart the COVID-ravaged economy. The West

Virus holds back an expanded P&N

COVID-19 has prevented P&N Group from taking full advantage of last year’s east coast expansion, with a $10.7 million virus hit against its loan book reining in annual profit. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Labor is poised to usher through Parliament legislation for almost $50 billion in business and personal tax relief while unveiling significant spending proposals of its own, arguing the Coalition can no longer moralise over debt and deficit.

James Packer was aware controversial gaming mogul Stanley Ho held a large shareholding in the parent company of Melco Resorts years before trying to sell a stake in Crown Resorts to the Macau-based casino operator.

Polls taken since the President was hospitalised over the weekend, and in the rubble of last week’s disastrous presidential debate, show him falling ever further behind Joe Biden as hundreds of thousands of Americans vote early.

Page 3: The shift to the home office may have led to longer workdays and more work, but workers are much happier and three in four are annoyed it took a pandemic for bosses to finally embrace remote work.

Page 4: Supermarket and fast-food giants could be the biggest beneficiaries of the government’s new wage subsidy for young people, with the hiring credits potentially reducing their wage liabilities for teenage workers by two-thirds.

Page 8: The government’s proposal for workers to carry their super with them when they change jobs is a threat to the workplace default system, industry superannuation funds say.

Page 9: Federal government departments will have to come clean on the billions spent on consulting firms, with new procurement rules set to enforce consistent reporting for the first time.

Page 11: Retailers expect consumers to spend rather than save the budget’s income tax cuts, boosting retail sales in the runup to Christmas.

Page 12: The federal government’s debt manager says it will not increase the size of its Treasury bond issuance beyond that which it forecast in July, despite the budget revealing a widening deficit for this financial year.

Page 13: Universities have ‘‘bought themselves time’’ with $1 billion in extra money for research in Tuesday’s budget, but the big challenge now is international enrolments, with Treasurer Josh Frydenberg warning travel for overseas students will be ‘‘closed off until late next year’’.

Page 15: Australia’s most innovative companies are gearing up to increase their research and development activity, with more jobs expected to flow into the sector thanks to the federal government winding back proposed cuts to the R&D tax incentive (RDTI) scheme.

Page 19: AGL Energy’s board suffered the dual embarrassment of a ‘‘first strike’’ over executive pay and a major black mark for its long-term reliance on coal power from the world’s largest asset manager.

Page 20: ASX-listed Downer EDI Ltd has hived off another part of its sizeable mining services business.

Page 21: Several of Australia’s biggest resources companies may quit the Queensland Resources Council, after its leadership refused to back down from an advertising campaign that urges voters to put the Greens Party last at the coming state election.

Page 25: Telstra is one-third of the way through its five-year reinvention as a renewable energy player, as it aims to match its consumption of traditionally sourced electricity with an equivalent investment in solar and wind by 2025.

Tesla is in talks with BHP on a nickel deal as the electric car maker targets higher production and seeks to avoid a supply crunch, people familiar with the matter say.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Australia’s biggest employers have backed Josh Frydenberg’s business incentives and wage subsidies, and vowed to invest and hire more staff, as union leaders and Labor warned the government’s new $4bn jobs scheme was open to rorting and could push older people out of work.

Page 5: Fresh from unveiling the biggest spending budget in living memory, Josh Frydenberg has said his government is prepared to do still more to support the economic recovery should it falter, as he doubled down on his push for the states to carry their fair share of the fiscal burden and urged them to reopen their borders.

Page 9: The International Monetary Fund has slammed “grossly insufficient” policies to combat climate change, predicting a climate “catastrophe” where global temperatures rise 5C unless governments impose steadily rising taxes on carbon dioxide emissions.

Page 11: Facebook said it would crackdown harder on QAnon, removing more groups and pages devoted to the fast-growing conspiracy-theory movement that has thrived on social media.

Page 15: The federal government’s latest shake-up of superannuation policy will increase the pressure on poor-performing funds to merge or lift their game, amid increased scrutiny on returns, fees and marketing spend.

Private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts is believed to be making early advances at Westpac’s wealth assets that are soon expected to hit the market.

Page 17: Australians have wiped almost one-quarter of their credit card debt in the six months to August, with balances accruing interest at their lowest level since December 2004 as “buy now, pay later” alternatives are embraced.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: The cashless welfare card will be changed so the purchase of alcohol and gambling items are automatically blocked by EFTPOS.

Page 5: WA dodged a COVID-19 recession and boasts a stronger economy than anywhere in the nation and potentially the planet, Ben Wyatt declared ahead of delivering his fourth State Budget.

Page 6: International students need to return to Australia by semester two next year or the nation risks losing its share of the market — and the $30 billion it generates annually — forever.

Page 7: The Federal Government has told the childcare sector it will run an unofficial six-month awareness campaign on the benefits of early learning before making serious reforms in next year’s Budget.

Premier Mark McGowan has ruled out a vote on WA forming its own country, pouring cold water on the aspirations of a micro party formed to fight for secession.

Page 14: Tennis legend Margaret Court has fired a backhander at Lotterywest after her church group was denied a grant to help feed needy Perth families because of her “biblical views on same-sex marriage”.

Business: BHP boss Mike Henry says the quicker the world decarbonises, the more valuable the mining giant will become.

Oat rice and noodles grown by WA farmers and developed by the Australian Export Grains Innovation Centre could be on Asian consumers’ plates in years, if a $2 million research project announced this week proves successful.

WA employers say the “devil is in the detail” in the Federal Budget, which is banking $35 billion on businesses to generate jobs, boost investment and kickstart the COVID-ravaged economy.

WA businesses powering through the COVID-19 crisis are set to be among the biggest beneficiaries of new Federal Government measures to boost economic activity.

Gold Fields is lauding its green credentials after completing the construction of its hybrid power system at its Granny Smith goldmine near Laverton.

COVID-19 has prevented P&N Group from taking full advantage of last year’s east coast expansion, with a $10.7 million virus hit against its loan book reining in annual profit.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

Subscription Options