15/09/2020 - 06:40

Morning Headlines

15/09/2020 - 06:40

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Morning Headlines

Western Australians named in Chinese files

Hundreds of prominent Western Australians, including politicians, judges and business leaders, are among those whose names and details appear in a massive database being maintained by a Chinese company with links to Beijing's military and intelligence networks. Visit the Business News website to find out which Western Australians are on the list. . https://www.businessnews.com.au/article/Western-Australians-named-in-Chinese-files    Business News

Keating weak on Rio Tinto deal: Costello

Former Treasurer Peter Costello believes the Keating government was ‘‘hoodwinked’’ into believing Australian interests would be preserved under the 1995 agreement that created the modern Rio Tinto, as the miner’s former boss Leigh Clifford called for the next chief executive to have an active voice in national affairs. The Fin

Minderoo plan to put out fires within an hour

Andrew Forrest’s philanthropic Minderoo Foundation thinks that within five years technology will make it possible to detect and snuff out any potentially dangerous bushfire within an hour of its starting. The Fin

Rio set to mine WA talent

Rio Tinto is likely to boost staff numbers in WA as pressure mounts on the London-headquartered mining giant to focus more resources on the area from which it derives the majority of its earnings. The West

Third of businesses want tax rate lowered

A third of businesses say a more flexible way of working has been the top benefit of the COVID-19 crisis and are now prioritising a lowering of the company tax rate as the top demand in next month’s federal budget. The Fin

JobSeeker cut tipped to slice $31bn off economic growth

Australia’s economic growth will shrink by $31.3bn and 145,000 jobs will be lost over the next two years if the coronavirus supplement for welfare recipients is cut back as planned, new analysis shows. The Aus

Seven bids for Boral board seat

The Kerry Stokes-controlled Seven Group Holdings is stepping up a push to have at least one representative on the board of Boral as the ailing building products group heads to the finishing stages of a major corporate overhaul. The Fin

Diamond driller DDH1 revives plans for float

Mining services provider DDH1 Drilling, backed by private equity firm Oaktree Capital Management, is believed to be reviving its plans for an initial public offering. The Aus

National Parks on sacred site charge

The Northern Territory Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority is prosecuting the federal director of National Parks over works allegedly done illegally on a sacred site near one of northern Australia’s most well-known tourism hot spots, Gunlom Falls in Kakadu. The Aus

Global oil demand to wane

BP says the relentless growth of oil demand is over, becoming the first super-major to call the end of an era many thought would last another decade or more. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: Scott Morrison is prepared to forcefully intervene in the energy market by building a new gas-fired power station in the Hunter Valley in NSW, and underwriting the construction of gas pipelines to feed a new national trading hub.

Leading figures in Australia’s nascent space industry suspect their extensive profiling in a Chinese database can be linked to repeated cyber attacks, as Beijing seeks a technological advantage in the strategic sector.

Page 3: Retail giant Wesfarmers has offered to co-design COVID-19 protocols with the Victorian government to enable shops to start opening from September 28, a month earlier than the existing plan.

Page 6: Andrew Forrest’s philanthropic Minderoo Foundation thinks that within five years technology will make it possible to detect and snuff out any potentially dangerous bushfire within an hour of its starting.

Page 8: A third of businesses say a more flexible way of working has been the top benefit of the COVID-19 crisis and are now prioritising a lowering of the company tax rate as the top demand in next month’s federal budget.

Page 13: Japan’s governing party yesterday anointed Yoshihide Suga, the current chief Cabinet secretary, as its choice for the next prime minister, settling on what it saw as a safe pair of hands to grapple with the country’s many economic and strategic challenges.

Page 15: Former Treasurer Peter Costello believes the Keating government was ‘‘hoodwinked’’ into believing Australian interests would be preserved under the 1995 agreement that created the modern Rio Tinto, as the miner’s former boss Leigh Clifford called for the next chief executive to have an active voice in national affairs.

Page 17: The owner of homewares chain Fantastic Furniture will have to accept a discount price and possibly retain a sizeable ongoing stake if it proceeds with plans for an initial public offering, fund managers say.

The Kerry Stokes-controlled Seven Group Holdings is stepping up a push to have at least one representative on the board of Boral as the ailing building products group heads to the finishing stages of a major corporate overhaul.

Page 21: The competition watchdog’s inquiry into app stores is a ‘‘positive but tiny step’’ into dealing with the way Apple and Google dominate the app economy, Australian developers say.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: Anthony Albanese has been given the green light to go to the next election without specific climate change targets for 2030, under an ALP draft policy platform that outlines plans to turn Australia into a “renewable energy superpower”.

Page 2: All Australians should be given a HECS-style loan from the government to pay the costs of their aged care, which will be repaid from their estate on their death, Paul Keating says.

Page 3: The Northern Territory Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority is prosecuting the federal director of National Parks over works allegedly done illegally on a sacred site near one of northern Australia’s most well-known tourism hot spots, Gunlom Falls in Kakadu.

Page 4: Australia’s economic growth will shrink by $31.3bn and 145,000 jobs will be lost over the next two years if the coronavirus supplement for welfare recipients is cut back as planned, new analysis shows.

Bulk-billed telehealth services must immediately be extended or patients and medical professionals will be put at risk, Australia’s psychologists have warned.

Page 6: Labor will use the COVID-19 economic recovery to pursue an aggressive industrial relations reform agenda, increasing the power of unions and imposing “new rights and forms of equality” in Australian workplaces.

Page 14: Mining services provider DDH1 Drilling, backed by private equity firm Oaktree Capital Management, is believed to be reviving its plans for an initial public offering.

Page 15: Rio Tinto should look to appoint an external chief executive who can steady the miner’s performance rather than embarking on a cultural revolution, while investors may press for board renewal following its poor handling of the Juukan Gorge destruction, Shaw and Partners says.

Page 20: The country’s largest listed pub landlord ALE Property Group has failed to win hoped for increases in rent from the Woolworths-backed ALH Group, with a long-running dispute between the pair resulting in only limited rises.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 6: Illegal dumping in the South West is under fire — with reports of rusted washing machines, ovens and broken lawnmowers left at dumping hotspots in the region.

Page 9: Facebook has not deleted or suspended the accounts of users who posted a suicide video that went so viral WA schools resorted to telling parents to keep their children offline.

Page 10: Ken Wyatt says he is concerned there will be a rise in suicides among Aboriginal communities because of the surge in anxiety surrounding COVID-19.

Sonja Gastevich — dubbed WA’s queen of pubs — has been fined almost $130,000 after she and three employees were netted in a covert fisheries sting buying valuable black-market seafood, including rock lobsters, from the boot of a car.

Page 12: Parents are being helped to shield their kids from online dangers and predators with an Australian-first app produced by local researchers.

Page 14: WA’s peak real estate body has warned that Perth is facing a rental crisis as vacancies fall to their lowest point since the mining boom of March 2007.

Business: Rio Tinto is likely to boost staff numbers in WA as pressure mounts on the London-headquartered mining giant to focus more resources on the area from which it derives the majority of its earnings.

Car sales group Eagers Automotive is buying the landmark home of its Big Rock Toyota dealership as part of $105 million property deal.

A powerful global group of investment firms controlling more than $60 trillion of assets has stepped up pressure on companies including Woodside Petroleum and Rio Tinto by calling on them to detail their plans to reduce carbon emissions.

BP says the relentless growth of oil demand is over, becoming the first super-major to call the end of an era many thought would last another decade or more.

WA’s success in handling the coronavirus crisis is proof that the State could lead the nation in improving gender equality in the workplace, according to leading executives and experts.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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