17/08/2020 - 06:40

Morning Headlines

17/08/2020 - 06:40

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ASIC flags ‘Robinhood’ trading risks

Morning Headlines

ASIC flags ‘Robinhood’ trading risks

The corporate regulator has social media accounts in its sights for fuelling high-risk behaviour, as inexperienced investors pile into ‘‘penny stocks’’ with poor earnings amid volatile coronavirus markets. The Fin

Go west: WA touts regional jobs

West Australian Premier Mark McGowan is doubling down on his call for city dwellers in search of work to head for the country with a planned campaign touting regional jobs. The Fin

Strike does deal despite Rio trouble

Strike Resources boss William Johnson says a Native Title agreement struck by the aspiring Pilbara iron ore producer shows healthy relationships between miners and Indigenous groups are still possible despite the recent Rio Tinto controversy. The West

Blue-chips to test positive results start

Earnings due from heavyweights CSL, BHP, Wesfarmers and Qantas this week will test the better-than-feared mood established by a positive start to reporting season, framed by discretionary retail winners and dividend surprises. The Fin

Show can still go on with locals

There is “no shortage of carnival rides” in WA and the Perth Royal Show would still thrill punters without Eastern States operators. The West

Overhaul tax mix to create jobs

One of the nation’s biggest employers has urged national cabinet to prioritise reform of the antiquated tax system, saying it has been one of the key reasons for Australia’s slow jobs growth and falling investment. The Aus

Innocent Aussies on flight ban lists

The federal government is forwarding the names of all Australians who have applied for permission to leave the country during the coronavirus pandemic to Border Force, the agency normally responsible for dealing with deadbeat parents trying to flee the country owing child support or in defiance of custody orders. The Aus

‘Paternal’ rules stifle native title business

The system that relies on a network of charitable trusts to hold billions in mining royalties on behalf of traditional owners is broken, according to the National Native Title Council. The Aus

Cottesloe beaten to sea pool

The long anticipated Ocean Reef Marina will have Perth’s first ocean pool, with building work on the sprawling waterfront precinct under way. The West

WA company gets Greenland rare earths nod

WA geologist Greg Barnes has won a key leg of the superpower race to develop a rare earths deposit in Greenland, with his company Tanbreez securing an exploitation licence. The West

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: The corporate regulator has social media accounts in its sights for fuelling high-risk behaviour, as inexperienced investors pile into ‘‘penny stocks’’ with poor earnings amid volatile coronavirus markets.

Page 3: A stunning pandemic sharemarket rally has delivered a $1.4 billion payday to a handful of low-key company founders and executives, who have ridden the boom for technology, mining or products benefiting from the global health crisis.

Page 4: Tradespeople, property agents, hairdressers, teachers and hundreds of other vocational workers should be able to cross state borders to work with minimum fuss.

Page 5: Victoria’s harsh restrictions appear to be working as virus cases start to fall and the state flattens the curve a second time.

Page 6: Financial Services Minister Jane Hume said reform of the superannuation system was ‘‘in the wings’’ and could be unveiled during the October federal budget.

Page 8: Major banks have finalised a deal with the Australian Bureau of Statistics to hand over detailed data on the spending habits of business and consumers to better track investment and consumption.

Page 9: West Australian Premier Mark McGowan is doubling down on his call for city dwellers in search of work to head for the country with a planned campaign touting regional jobs.

Page 14: Earnings due from heavyweights CSL, BHP, Wesfarmers and Qantas this week will test the better-than-feared mood established by a positive start to reporting season, framed by discretionary retail winners and dividend surprises.

Page 15: Lynas Corporation and its brokers had a long night of fundie meetings ahead of them last night, as they sought to price the rare earth metals producer’s mooted $425 million capital raising.

Page 17: ANZ and Westpac, which deferred interim dividends in late April and early May, are expected to report strong equity capital ratios of about 11 per cent this week, but may continue to sit on shareholder payouts given the continuing uncertainty about the pace of the COVID-19 recovery.

Page 20: About $665 million of investment by Australia’s LNG sector could see solar power displace a chunk of gas used to power processing units and cut 10-11 per cent of carbon emissions from the plants.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: One of the nation’s biggest employers has urged national cabinet to prioritise reform of the antiquated tax system, saying it has been one of the key reasons for Australia’s slow jobs growth and falling investment.

The federal government is forwarding the names of all Australians who have applied for permission to leave the country during the coronavirus pandemic to Border Force, the agency normally responsible for dealing with deadbeat parents trying to flee the country owing child support or in defiance of custody orders.

Page 3: Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has introduced sweeping guidelines for ASIO and its spies, making it clear that officers who use force against people during investigations must be appropriately trained but have an “inherent right” to self-defence.

Page 4: Every passenger and crew member aboard an incoming cruise ship will be required to declare they do not have symptoms for COVID-19 under a set of enhanced protocols being considered by federal officials in the aftermath of the Ruby Princess catastrophe.

Page 7: The system that relies on a network of charitable trusts to hold billions in mining royalties on behalf of traditional owners is broken, according to the National Native Title Council.

Page 13: Corporate Australia has so far defied the worst of the hit to the economy from the coronavirus, but investors are bracing for disappointment when it comes to profit guidance as earnings season hits top gear in coming days.

Page 15: Shares in consumer electronics chain JB Hi-Fi hit a record high of $47.41 on Friday ahead of the company’s annual results announcement on Monday.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 3: Basil Zempilas says he will walk away from talkback radio at the end of the year if he is successful in his City of Perth mayoral bid.

Page 4: A Perth grandmother claims she has been fleeced of $190,000 by Australia’s bogus Tiger King Sam Barnett.

Page 7: A top Perth doctor is calling on WA’s wealthy to lend their private jets for organ donation transfers, with transplant movements across the country significantly disrupted amid coronavirus.

Page 9: There is “no shortage of carnival rides” in WA and the Perth Royal Show would still thrill punters without Eastern States operators.

Page 11: The University of Western Australia has jumped up the list of top ranking universities, rising from 99th in the world to 85th in the past year.

Page 16: The long anticipated Ocean Reef Marina will have Perth’s first ocean pool, with building work on the sprawling waterfront precinct under way.

New funding for Indigenous-led research could help shape national and State policies, a leading researcher says.

Business: WA geologist Greg Barnes has won a key leg of the superpower race to develop a rare earths deposit in Greenland, with his company Tanbreez securing an exploitation licence.

Strike Resources boss William Johnson says a Native Title agreement struck by the aspiring Pilbara iron ore producer shows healthy relationships between miners and Indigenous groups are still possible despite the recent Rio Tinto controversy.

WA should become “the natural locus of iron-making for the world” as the globe shifts to a zero carbon future, a parliamentary committee has been told.

Health care, construction and information technology are dominating the job market in most parts of Australia, with thousands of roles continuing to be advertised amid the COVID-19 downturn.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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