22/06/2020 - 06:52

Morning Headlines

22/06/2020 - 06:52

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Morning Headlines

Rich Lister bets $1b on Perth property

Rich Lister Paul Blackburne is charging out of hibernation with a bullish $1 billion punt that Perth’s property market will blitz its east coast rivals over the next five years. The Fin

It’s all stops to Ellenbrook

A contract to build five train stations on the Morley-Ellenbrook line will be awarded by November, with the McGowan Government today unveiling a plan for the $1 billion project. The West

Big miners back a greener future

The lobby group representing Australia’s largest resources companies will commit to “decarbonising” the economy as it stares down pressure from its members to take more action on climate change. The Aus

Victorian virus spike splits states

State and federal governments are splintering over the agreement to reopen the Australian economy after a surge of coronavirus cases in Victoria triggered warnings from Queensland and Western Australia they may keep their borders closed longer. The Fin

BHP buy bolsters nickel operation

BHP is about to push the button on its third new WA nickel mine in a year as it prepares to begin production from a new underground operation at Leinster and adds Norilsk Nickel’s giant Honeymoon Well project to its inventory.

Tough new cyber rules for business

Businesses will be required to comply with minimum standards of cybersecurity under a federal government plan to harden the defences of vulnerable computer networks against foreign adversaries and cyber criminals.

NEC pitches 5G tech in place of Huawei

Japanese tech giant NEC has set its sights on the rollout of 5G in Australia, offering Australian telcos cutting edge technology and a secure counterbalance to China’s Huawei. The Fin

Fiji’s ‘bula bubble’ plan to restart tourism

Australians looking to escape coronavirus lockdowns could soon be allowed to travel to the Pacific paradise of Fiji under a new ‘‘bula bubble’’ plan for safe tourism. The Fin

NAB, Deloitte struggle with remediation

National Australia Bank’s flagship $2.35 billion remediation program for poor financial advice has become bogged down following a decision by Deloitte to set up a separate cut-price delivery arm staffed with junior graduates on temporary contracts, rather than regular consulting staff. The Fin

Australian beef exports at risk

A major Chinese commodities trader has warned it will be forced to abandon Australian beef in favour of US suppliers if Beijing does not lift bans on four of the country’s biggest abattoirs in the next six months. The Fin

Covid drug ‘by end of the year’

A global breakthrough on a new antiviral drug that scientists believe could block the coronavirus has been made in Australia. The Aus

 

 

The Australian Financial Review

Page 1: State and federal governments are splintering over the agreement to reopen the Australian economy after a surge of coronavirus cases in Victoria triggered warnings from Queensland and Western Australia they may keep their borders closed longer.

‘‘The country needs to get back to work,’’ says Lang Walker, the founder of Walker Corporation, the nation’s largest privately owned property development company, which currently has about $35 billion worth of projects in the pipeline over the next 15 years.

Businesses will be required to comply with minimum standards of cybersecurity under a federal government plan to harden the defences of vulnerable computer networks against foreign adversaries and cyber criminals.

Page 3: Many vendors are selling their properties quickly before auction to take advantage of buyer demand for the small amount of stock on the market as doubts linger about what the future holds.

Page 4: Japanese tech giant NEC has set its sights on the rollout of 5G in Australia, offering Australian telcos cutting edge technology and a secure counterbalance to China’s Huawei.

Page 6: Australians looking to escape coronavirus lockdowns could soon be allowed to travel to the Pacific paradise of Fiji under a new ‘‘bula bubble’’ plan for safe tourism.

Page 7: Education Minister Dan Tehan says one of the issues that became very apparent during the drought, flood and bushfires earlier this year was the lack of proper counselling services in affected communities, which explains one of the changes to university student fees.

Page 9: The Tax Practitioners Board has deregistered Wattle Health Australia’s former chairman, accountant Peter Biantes, for dishonesty over his role in hiding $35 million from the sale of a cheese business overseas.

The Morrison government has ‘‘no current intention’’ to put forward an Australian candidate to run the embattled World Trade Organisation, Trade Minister Simon Birmingham has revealed.

Page 10: A major Chinese commodities trader has warned it will be forced to abandon Australian beef in favour of US suppliers if Beijing does not lift bans on four of the country’s biggest abattoirs in the next six months.

Page 11: President Donald Trump’s attempt to revive his re-election campaign sputtered badly Saturday night (yesterday AEST) as he travelled to Tulsa for his first mass rally in months and found a far smaller crowd than his aides had promised him, then delivered a disjointed speech that did not address the multiple crises facing the nation or scandals battering him in Washington.

Page 12: Universities will have to look at efficiencies and cost savings to replace lost research revenue resulting from the coronavirus, but the federal education minister Dan Tehan says there may be a plan in the October budget to help on research spending.

Page 13: National Australia Bank’s flagship $2.35 billion remediation program for poor financial advice has become bogged down following a decision by Deloitte to set up a separate cut-price delivery arm staffed with junior graduates on temporary contracts, rather than regular consulting staff.

Page 17: Mental health disability claims have soared more than 50 per cent over the past five years, putting strain on an industry that struggled to make any money at all in 2019, a new report commissioned by the Financial Services Council shows.

 

 

The Australian

Page 1: A spike in COVID-19 cases in Victoria has sparked fears that a second wave of infections could slow down the national economic recovery and prevent the planned lifting of travel restrictions.

The lobby group representing Australia’s largest resources companies will commit to “decarbonising” the economy as it stares down pressure from its members to take more action on climate change.

Page 2: Government agencies and departments vulnerable to targeted cyber attacks are urgently ramping up defence strategies, as new data from the competition watchdog reveals hacking attacks have contributed to Australians losing more than $634m in scams.

From top to bottom, the Chinese economy — the world’s second-largest, Australia’s biggest trading partner and for decades the source of almost metronomic growth — is in a bad state.

Page 3: Governor-General David Hurley says Australia’s honours system must “evolve” if it is to retain the confidence of Australians, as former chief of the Defence Force Chris Barrie called for more community heroes to be given the top awards.

Page 5: A global breakthrough on a new antiviral drug that scientists believe could block the coronavirus has been made in Australia.

Page 6: Universities will be paid less to teach courses such as maths and engineering under the Morrison government’s overhaul of higher education funding — despite those programs being promoted by Education Minister Dan Tehan as post-pandemic job creators.

Page 13: Energy giant Shell has pushed back at the prospect of cheaper gas on Australia’s east coast as an unrealistic short-term target and says its future investments will focus on lower carbon emissions amid shareholder pressure to meet ambitious climate goals.

Page 15: BHP is about to push the button on its third new WA nickel mine in a year as it prepares to begin production from a new underground operation at Leinster and adds Norilsk Nickel’s giant Honeymoon Well project to its inventory.

Page 19: The James Warburton-led Seven West Media is poised to renew the reincarnated Big Brother for a second season in 2021, as the reality show spearheads what Seven hopes will be its re-emergence as the leader in the lucrative 25-54 age television demographic by the end of next year.

 

 

The West Australian

Page 1: WA’s beleaguered home building industry is set to bounce back to pre-pandemic levels over the next year, thanks to a wave of new construction work fuelled by government grants.

Page 3: The safest place for an AFL hub is clearly Western Australia — and there is no convincing Mark McGowan otherwise.

Page 7: Former prime minister Julia Gillard has expressed regret over not calling out sexist language earlier during her time as the nation’s leader.

Page 8: Almost half of Australians who have been working from home do not want to return to the workplace — but it’s annoying colleagues and daily commutes putting them off more than any potentially deadly virus.

Page 10: Detectives are searching for burglars who stole 500kg of fish from an Esperance seafood market.

Page 11: Survivors of domestic violence will be better protected after an $18.2 million boost for family violence prevention legal services in WA aimed at reducing abuse experienced by Indigenous women.

Page 14: Land was prepared at two of Perth’s biggest cemeteries for more than 7000 “rapid burials” at the height of fears a devastating coronavirus outbreak would sweep through WA.

Mark McGowan has called on City of Perth commissioners not to axe Skyworks, hinting concerns about the massive crowds the Australia Day event draws annually would be addressed under the imminent move to phase four restrictions.

Business: A contract to build five train stations on the Morley-Ellenbrook line will be awarded by November, with the McGowan Government today unveiling a plan for the $1 billion project.

The return of the AFL season has proved to be an economic powerhouse for WA, with a report revealing the weekend of June 13-14 as the best turnover weekend of the year for WA pubs — including against pre-COVID months.

STANDING BY BUSINESS. TRUSTED BY BUSINESS.

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